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SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Steven Pressman
In the spring of 1939, on the eve of the Holocaust, Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus set out on a highly unlikely mission. The handsome lawyer and his stylish wife left their two young children and their comfortable home near Philadelphia's Rittenhouse Square, sailed across the Atlantic Ocean and made their way into Nazi-controlled Austria. Their goal: to rescue 50 Jewish children from Vienna and bring them to safety in the United States. The fact that the Krauses were Jewish added to the daunting challenges and long odds that stood in their way. Yet another obstacle was American attitudes and policies during the 1930s that all but shut the door to Jews trapped by the Third Reich.
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NATIONAL
March 31, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A man killed his three children at a downtown Baltimore hotel, then called the front desk to report the killings, police said. Mark Castillo, 41, of Silver Spring was being held in the deaths. Police spokesman Sterling Clifford identified the children as Anthony, 6, Austin, 4, and Athena, 2.
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Vincent Bevins
Between a cluster of bars in this small coastal town, middle-aged European men hover around dozens of fresh-faced Brazilian women in tight dresses. Around the corner, two girls who look to be in their teens flag down cars, signaling their availability to potential clients. Most such activity, however, seems confined to a small, seedy tourist strip, the last gasp of a bygone era. Natal, long known as a hot spot for sex tourism, has seen fewer problems in the wake of a national economic boom and concerted government efforts to cut back on the Carnaval nation's carnal image.
NEWS
November 15, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was a popular teacher, known for working past midnight on school projects and being a compassionate ally to her students. He was one of the special ones: a sixth-grader with whom she had recognized a kindred spirit when he entered her class, talented and intense.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | from Associated Press
Actress Bette Davis left her daughters and grandsons out of her nearly $1- million estate, according to a will filed for probate Monday. The bulk of the estate is split between her son and a close friend. Davis, who died on Oct. 6 of cancer at age 81, had been estranged from her daughter, Barbara Davis Hyman of Charlottesville, Va., since Hyman's book, "My Mother's Keeper," was published in 1985.
NEWS
July 10, 2003 | Katherine Tolford, Special to The Times
Seven-year-olds Serena Beggs and Alexandra Valladares are in total agreement that the proper way to wipe their mouths at the table is to gently dab their lips with their napkins. "You don't want to wipe in big circles or you'll get it all over your face," Serena says. The two are students in etiquette consultant Maggie O'Farrill's six-hour manners class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
After months searching for work and feeling increasingly discouraged, Natalie Cole caught a break — an offer of a part-time position at a Little Caesars Pizza shop in Compton. The manager scheduled her orientation and told her she had to pass a food safety test. She took the test — and failed. But rather than study and take it again, she shrugged it off. "I guess I am not working for a reason," she said. PHOTOS: A life spent battling poverty Cole isn't a victim of the struggling economy.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Active parents of young children once had to stay home or find a baby-sitter if they wanted to jog or bicycle. Now, courtesy of fitness-oriented marketers plugging in to the booming baby market, a variety of safe and sleek devices help parents take their infants and toddlers on the road. Since 1984, parents serious about their jogging have been rolling their children out in jogging strollers, the three-wheeled devices that sometimes even have their own class in 10-K races.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | TRACY THOMPSON, THE WASHINGTON POST
As a child in post-World War II England, Shirley McGlade clipped a picture of movie star Jeff Chandler and put it in her wallet. That was her father, she told schoolmates--a rich American who had divorced her mother and was fighting for custody of her. "People believed me," she said. "I lived in a fantasy world."
HOME & GARDEN
April 26, 2014 | Chris Erskine
I'm nothing if not a futurist, so as we explore here the nuances of postmodern parenting, we look ahead to what kind of parents our own offspring will one day be: well-meaning pushovers or total tyrants? "I'm going to be such a Nazi," the daughter of a co-worker announces. "I'm going to be the perfect compromise of the two," predicts my older daughter, lovely and patient and - at 30 - eager to start a family of her own. Not even a mother yet, and you can spot my daughter's maternal instincts starting to kick in, softening her feisty, bossy-pants exterior.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Based on the 2011 Cameron Diaz film of the same name, "Bad Teacher" is something of a novelty on CBS, a single-camera comedy in a sea of old-fashioned multicamera, feel-the-hilarity sitcoms like "The Big Bang Theory," "Two Broke Girls" and "Mike & Molly. " ("The Crazy Ones," whose time slot "Bad Teacher" will occupy, cracked that mold this season but did not break it.) Nevertheless, and for all the studied outrageousness of its model, it tells a now-familiar, deceptively sweet tale of the unruly force that brings its own kind of order and relief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Paloma Esquivel
Moments after a school bus crashed in the Anaheim Hills, students screamed for help as Good Samaritans rushed to free them from the wrecked vehicle, according to witnesses. The witnesses heard a loud crack Thursday afternoon as the yellow bus smashed into trees on a grassy hill along East Nohl Ranch Road by the Anaheim Hills Golf Course.  "I saw the bus drive up and fly up and crash," said Michelle Imperial, who was driving in the opposite direction. She said she pulled over and called 911 as children screamed: "Help me!
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration's move to regulate e-cigarettes drew criticism Thursday from some public health advocates, who said the regulations do not go far enough to protect young consumers. The proposed rule would for the first time allow the government to limit the manufacture and sale of e-cigarettes, as well as cigars and pipe tobacco. Sales to minors would be banned and health warning labels required. But the new rules would not ban online sales or restrict youth-friendly flavors such as watermelon and peppermint.
OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Faced with the threat of a ballot initiative on teacher firings that could have placed it in the awkward position of publicly defending child molesters, the California Teachers Assn. agreed to a compromise: legislation to streamline the appeals process for teachers who are accused of such egregious misconduct. The procedures outlined in the bill strike the right balance of providing teachers with due process to ensure that they have not been fired unfairly, while speeding up the process and making it far simpler and less expensive.
OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The key lines in the final report of the Los Angeles County Blue Ribbon Commission on Child Protection, which was released late Friday and comes before the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, may be two sentences that don't use the words "foster care," "child death," "Dependency Court" or "early intervention. " They deal instead with the question of just why a government with vast resources at its disposal can't seem to put them together to protect children from abuse and neglect. "The problem is not that county leaders and workers do not care," the report says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1994 | KENT BLACK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last winter, Paul Petersen was awakened by a frantic call. "It was this kid calling from the Roxy," recalls Petersen, 48, an author and onetime child actor who played Jeff on "The Donna Reed Show" from 1958 through 1966. "He said he saw River Phoenix in one of the nightclub's bathroom stalls shooting heroin." Petersen, who for four years has been organizing support groups for former child stars and the pressure they face in an often indifferent Hollywood, sprang into action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two El Segundo toddlers found dead in their beds last spring were poisoned by oleander leaves from a neighbor's yard that they picked and ate, coroner's officials said Tuesday. The case of Alexei and Peter Wiltsey, ages 2 and 3, represents the first confirmed accidental deaths by oleander poisoning in county history, said coroner's spokesman Scott Carrier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When she was 4, Doris Pilkington Garimara was uprooted from her home in western Australia and sent to a camp for "half-caste" aboriginals, where she grew up believing she had been abandoned and forgotten by her mother. Decades passed before she learned the full story - one that would not only answer painful questions about her past but help Australians understand one of the ugliest chapters in theirs. Pilkington Garimara and her mother belonged to "the stolen generations" - the estimated 100,000 children of mixed aboriginal and white ancestry who by government edict were snatched from their homes and reared in desolate settlements.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2014 | By Colleen Mastony
The nurses on the 20th floor were the first to see them. "Oh my goodness," declared Colleen Forrester, 29, a nurse dressed in green scrubs, who pointed to the windows. Other nurses came to look and laughed. Were the children strong enough to come see? Soon, parents and nurses were leading kids out of their rooms. The children were small and frail-looking. Most were undergoing treatment for cancer and other serious disorders. But on this cold April morning, they had a precious moment of distraction.
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