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NEWS
February 13, 1992 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to do for children in the 1990s what the environmental movement did for the Earth in the 1970s, an unusually broad coalition of interest groups on Wednesday unveiled a "children's platform" of political issues for California's 7.8 million residents who are too young to vote.
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NEWS
August 14, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore opened his convention-week journey toward Los Angeles on Sunday by campaigning here for universal health insurance for children, one of his highest priorities. At a town hall meeting in a children's hospital, Gore vowed to reach that goal by the end of his first term as president. "The top priority must be to make a national commitment to give high-quality health care to every single child in America within these next four years," the vice president said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little children Tuesday night led the Santa Clarita City Council into the arena of international trade. At the urging of fifth-graders, the council barred city government use of 43 tropical hardwoods, thereby joining a campaign to save rain forests in South America, Asia and Africa. Such bans have been adopted by seven other U. S. cities and states, among them Santa Monica, San Francisco and Arizona. In July the Los Angeles City Council ordered its attorneys to draw up a similar ordinance.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
School uniforms. Teen curfews. More educational programming on television for children. At times it sounds as though Bill Clinton is running for president of the PTA, not president of the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
RefuseNews, a monthly magazine for anyone interested in garbage, is talking trash, according to the city of Santa Clarita. The publication has accused the city of using Hitlerian tactics to enlist schoolchildren in its fight against a huge public trash dump proposed for nearby Elsmere Canyon.
NEWS
July 14, 1992 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
What do those who are not yet old enough to vote make of presidential campaigns and elections? One youngster thinks the job of political convention delegates is to "resent" their states. Another child says people who are expected to help the President once he's elected sometimes are locked up in his Cabinet. These young political pundits are quoted in "The World According to Kids!"--a compilation of 32 years of children's wit by retired teacher Harold Dunn of Ballwin, Mo.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although none of the students in Donna Showenkopf's fourth-grade class can vote, they are shrewd students of presidential politics. Listen to the question that 9-year-old Maurice McRae lobbed Wednesday at Democratic presidential hopeful Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. during a campaign stop at 61st Street Elementary School in South-Central Los Angeles. "What are you going to do to get more delegates?" Maurice asked. An obviously flustered Brown asked his young interrogator for advice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1988
I was one of the supervising teachers at the Republican political rally at Cal State Fullerton on Nov. 1. I am just now recovering from my feeling of malaise. When the principal of the school where I teach proposed that I take one of my classes, we both were under the impression that we would observe the office of the President of the United States in action. The helicopters would land, President Reagan would disembark, he would greet the audience gathered outside, and then he would move into the gymnasium to continue with the Republican rally.
NEWS
July 10, 1994 | AMY KUEBELBECK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the white farmhouse where Allen Quist grew up doing chores with his three brothers, politics was not considered polite dinner conversation. But the world has changed for the worse since then, according to the man who wants to be Minnesota governor. So in the same southern Minnesota farmhouse he now shares with his wife and children, politics is the topic of the day, every day. Quist, an unabashed religious conservative, squashed incumbent Gov.
NEWS
October 31, 1988 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
In a deadly attack with possibly decisive political repercussions, an Israeli mother and her three children burned to death Sunday when Arab youths hurled five gasoline bombs at a passenger bus near the West Bank town of Jericho and flames engulfed the vehicle, military officials said. At least five other passengers were injured and taken by helicopter and ambulance to hospitals in Jerusalem, about 20 miles away. One was reported in serious condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1994 | ROGER MAHONY, Cardinal Roger Mahony is archbishop of Los Angeles
Carelessly written and poorly drafted laws have a way of building common ground among the most unlikely of allies. It should be instructive, therefore, to note the surprising array of individuals now sharing the editorial pages of newspapers and the podiums of news conferences in opposition to Proposition 187. The growing list of opponents to this measure eludes any stereotype.
NEWS
July 14, 1992 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
What do those who are not yet old enough to vote make of presidential campaigns and elections? One youngster thinks the job of political convention delegates is to "resent" their states. Another child says people who are expected to help the President once he's elected sometimes are locked up in his Cabinet. These young political pundits are quoted in "The World According to Kids!"--a compilation of 32 years of children's wit by retired teacher Harold Dunn of Ballwin, Mo.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although none of the students in Donna Showenkopf's fourth-grade class can vote, they are shrewd students of presidential politics. Listen to the question that 9-year-old Maurice McRae lobbed Wednesday at Democratic presidential hopeful Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. during a campaign stop at 61st Street Elementary School in South-Central Los Angeles. "What are you going to do to get more delegates?" Maurice asked. An obviously flustered Brown asked his young interrogator for advice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
RefuseNews, a monthly magazine for anyone interested in garbage, is talking trash, according to the city of Santa Clarita. The publication has accused the city of using Hitlerian tactics to enlist schoolchildren in its fight against a huge public trash dump proposed for nearby Elsmere Canyon.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to do for children in the 1990s what the environmental movement did for the Earth in the 1970s, an unusually broad coalition of interest groups on Wednesday unveiled a "children's platform" of political issues for California's 7.8 million residents who are too young to vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little children Tuesday night led the Santa Clarita City Council into the arena of international trade. At the urging of fifth-graders, the council barred city government use of 43 tropical hardwoods, thereby joining a campaign to save rain forests in South America, Asia and Africa. Such bans have been adopted by seven other U. S. cities and states, among them Santa Monica, San Francisco and Arizona. In July the Los Angeles City Council ordered its attorneys to draw up a similar ordinance.
BOOKS
June 4, 1989 | Julius Lester, Lester's most recent book is "The Tales of Uncle Remus: The Further Adventures of Br'er Rabbit," the second of four volumes retelling the Uncle Remus tales. He teaches in the Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. and
The debate continues in children's literature over whether children should be exposed to books addressing controversial social issues. Publishers, librarians and teachers are understandably wary of politically sensitive topics, particularly during a time when some parents express their disapproval of the books their children are reading by suing school boards, or demanding that certain books be removed from library shelves. If nothing else, such controversies prove that the pen (or should it be, word processor?
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David N. Dinkins was inaugurated as New York's 106th and first black mayor Monday, pledging during historic ceremonies to be the toughest mayor ever on crime and dedicating his Administration to the troubled children of the nation's largest city. "I stand before you today as the elected leader of the greatest city of a great nation, to which my ancestors were brought, chained and whipped in the hold of a slave ship," Dinkins told a crowd of thousands gathered in front of City Hall.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David N. Dinkins was inaugurated as New York's 106th and first black mayor Monday, pledging during historic ceremonies to be the toughest mayor ever on crime and dedicating his Administration to the troubled children of the nation's largest city. "I stand before you today as the elected leader of the greatest city of a great nation, to which my ancestors were brought, chained and whipped in the hold of a slave ship," Dinkins told a crowd of thousands gathered in front of City Hall.
BOOKS
June 4, 1989 | Julius Lester, Lester's most recent book is "The Tales of Uncle Remus: The Further Adventures of Br'er Rabbit," the second of four volumes retelling the Uncle Remus tales. He teaches in the Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. and
The debate continues in children's literature over whether children should be exposed to books addressing controversial social issues. Publishers, librarians and teachers are understandably wary of politically sensitive topics, particularly during a time when some parents express their disapproval of the books their children are reading by suing school boards, or demanding that certain books be removed from library shelves. If nothing else, such controversies prove that the pen (or should it be, word processor?
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