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February 21, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, Lynne Heffley covers the children's beat for The Times.
Baby beluga in the deep blue sea, Swim so wild and you swim so free . . . Whatever happened to Raffi? Raffi, the first children's music superstar, whose gold- and platinum-selling songs about baby beluga whales and global unity--plus some shrewd marketing strategies--earned him such screaming, clapping adulation from small fans that he became known as the Springsteen of the preschool set.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By Lynne Heffley
The recent rise of multicultural, rock and roots children's music isn't news to Music for Little People. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, the Northern California-based independent label has been committed to bringing alternative music to families since its inception in 1985 as a living room mail order operation in woodsy Humboldt County. Hot current favorites Dan Zanes, Laurie Berkner and Milkshake appear in its catalog; so do such blues, world and folk veterans as Taj Mahal, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Pete Seeger and Buckwheat Zydeco.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
In the "thirtysomething" era of aerobics videos for kids, fetal phones to talk to the not-yet-born and gourmet baby food, it seems inevitable that someone would produce music for infants. Fivesomething years ago, record industry veteran Ellen Wohlstadter, 35, was searching for music to play for her newborn son, Jason. Finding nothing she liked, she and her husband, David, 36, produced their own cassette with a variety of traditional lullabies such as "Rock-A-Bye-Baby," with ballads they grew up listening to written by the Beatles and other artists.
NEWS
October 4, 2007 | Michael Berick, Special to The Times
When Brady Rymer takes the stage Saturday morning at the Santa Monica Pier, he'll undoubtedly be in better spirits than his last time in L.A. Although the show marks his local debut as a family music performer, he played in town in the '90s as a member of the East Coast jam-pop group From Good Homes. Those stressful industry showcases don't bring the best memories.
NEWS
October 4, 2007 | Michael Berick, Special to The Times
When Brady Rymer takes the stage Saturday morning at the Santa Monica Pier, he'll undoubtedly be in better spirits than his last time in L.A. Although the show marks his local debut as a family music performer, he played in town in the '90s as a member of the East Coast jam-pop group From Good Homes. Those stressful industry showcases don't bring the best memories.
NEWS
August 19, 2004 | Lynne Heffley
Chicago-based pop artist Justin Roberts, who will perform a family concert at Theatricum Botanicum on Sunday, continues to turn out some of the best children's music in the business: hip and sophisticated enough for adults to enjoy, but never losing sight of his target audience. His fourth children's music CD, the just released "Way Out," is no exception.
NEWS
June 21, 2007 | Brenda Rees, Special to The Times
THE report card is in: Tom Chapin gets an A-plus. Performing first for adults in the 1960s as part of the Chapin Brothers with brother Harry, then jumping into the children's arena in the 1980s, singer-songwriter Chapin has an unusually loyal fan base of teachers who routinely use the East Coast folkie's songs in classrooms across the country.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
Waylon Jennings and Collin Raye did it. Keb' Mo, Harry Connick Jr. and Dom DeLuise have done it. John Lithgow has made it a part-time occupation. It seems to have become almost obligatory for artists to make at least one kids' album. Dan Zanes, former lead singer of the high-profile, gritty 1980s Del Fuegos rock band, however, crossed over and stayed. "I feel like I found my calling," the raspy-voiced rocker said, "but it found me, really."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Lobos, the band born in an East Los Angeles garage in 1973 and now one of the most respected names in pop music, is the heartbeat of a new children's album. Lalo Guerrero, the pioneer Mexican American folk singer and activist, is the heart. And children's music has rarely sounded so good.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1994 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Joanie Bartels recorded her first children's album in a garage in 1985, she was not expecting children's music to become her full-time career. Nine years later, Bartels is near the top of the field, with a gold record to her credit, 2.5 million of her numerous recordings sold, a home video series and plans for a TV show.
NEWS
June 21, 2007 | Brenda Rees, Special to The Times
THE report card is in: Tom Chapin gets an A-plus. Performing first for adults in the 1960s as part of the Chapin Brothers with brother Harry, then jumping into the children's arena in the 1980s, singer-songwriter Chapin has an unusually loyal fan base of teachers who routinely use the East Coast folkie's songs in classrooms across the country.
NEWS
August 19, 2004 | Lynne Heffley
Chicago-based pop artist Justin Roberts, who will perform a family concert at Theatricum Botanicum on Sunday, continues to turn out some of the best children's music in the business: hip and sophisticated enough for adults to enjoy, but never losing sight of his target audience. His fourth children's music CD, the just released "Way Out," is no exception.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
Waylon Jennings and Collin Raye did it. Keb' Mo, Harry Connick Jr. and Dom DeLuise have done it. John Lithgow has made it a part-time occupation. It seems to have become almost obligatory for artists to make at least one kids' album. Dan Zanes, former lead singer of the high-profile, gritty 1980s Del Fuegos rock band, however, crossed over and stayed. "I feel like I found my calling," the raspy-voiced rocker said, "but it found me, really."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2001 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Kiddie music" isn't Keb' Mo's thing. Making a children's album wasn't remotely on the to-do list of this two-time Grammy Award-winning blues artist. When he first agreed to record for Sony Wonder, the children's and family division of Sony Music and Epic Records, it was an "I'll show up in the studio, then get back to my real work" kind of thing. Then he got hooked. The unconventional result is the new release "Big Wide Grin," an intimate celebration of life, family and the freedom to be.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2000 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children's music artists don't have the record company clout or nationally promoted high profile of rock and rap stars, so when a handful of the best get together for a concert, it might not seem such a big deal. But if any children in your life have even a passing acquaintance with the top talent scheduled to perform in the fifth annual "Sunday Funday" musical blowout Sunday in West Hills, you'll know it's a rare opportunity to see a stellar lineup.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1997 | MICHAEL SILVERSHER, Michael Silversher is a composer and co-songwriter, with his wife, Patty, for Disney and Jim Henson Productions. He has two prime-time Emmy nominations. He is also musical composer and director for South Coast Repertory's educational touring show. He is a former musical director for Robert Redford's Sundance Children's Theatre and Playwrights' Lab, and was composer and sound designer with Taper / P.L.A.Y
In Connie Johnson's review of "Anastasia: Music From the Motion Picture," she makes the sweeping statement that "depth and kid-friendliness aren't usually viewed as compatible" (" 'Anastasia' Soundtrack Offers Kid-Friendly Array of Songs," Calendar, Nov. 8). Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, the best of children's music is often the best that music has to offer. Johnson confuses depth with complexity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
The high-profile status of children's music began in the mid-'80s with the Big Three from Canada: Raffi, the Sharon, Lois and Bram trio and Fred Penner. Soft-spoken, guitar-toting, one-name Raffi came first and still reigns supreme. He's been referred to as both the Bruce Springsteen and the Elvis of the preschool set, thanks to the ardor of his young fans, who roar their approval at concerts and shower him with crayoned expressions of affection.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | MICHELE SEIPP
Customers quietly browse through George Kubiskie's record shop, where fresh flowers often grace the counter, a Rudolph Valentino poster hangs on the wall and classical music plays softly over the radio. "There are no loud noises in this store," Kubiskie said. Nor is there any rock music. Or jazz. Or pop. Or country. Kubiskie's Classical Record Shop in Beverly Hills sells only classical. It is one of a smattering of specialty music stores in Los Angeles. Unlike chain stores, these shops do not follow the whims of Top-40 musical tastes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1997 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A child's journey has a thousand detours. A walk around the block becomes a down-on-all-fours inspection of a caterpillar. A hurried turn through the supermarket frozen-food section dissolves into a finger-painting session on frosty glass doors. Such wanderings can be hugely frustrating to adults. We wail, we plead, we all but nip at their heels like collies on a herd of recalcitrant sheep, but still they won't get down to business.
NEWS
January 19, 1996
Although children are taught that the lyrics of "Pop Goes the Weasel," refer to an animal being chased around by a mischievous monkey, the original English song referred to pawnbrokers, according to the book "God Bless Pawnbrokers," by Peter Schwed. When the song was written in 1853, "pop" meant to hock or pawn. "Weasel" was slang for the heavy iron used for pressing garments, a valuable item at the time.
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