Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChildren S Rights
IN THE NEWS

Children S Rights

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kimberly Mays, the girl who was switched at birth and became the center of one of the nation's most celebrated custody fights, has moved in with her biological parents--the same couple she once told a court she never wanted to see again. The surprise move follows weeks of turmoil in the life of the 15-year-old, who for the past several days had been living in a Sarasota YMCA shelter for troubled teens.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 30, 2012 | Jim Newton
Last week, when a boy in Los Angeles foster care appeared before Judge Amy Pellman, she welcomed him warmly and clearly knew his history. Pellman asked how his martial-arts class was going, complimented him on his grades and urged him to enroll in a program that would help prepare him for college. Another case that morning involved a 19-year-old woman preparing to emancipate from foster care. She boasted of keeping her grade-point average above 3.0; Pellman called that "awesome. " And when Pellman saw two boys at the back of the court stirring restlessly, she asked if either would like a teddy bear or a book.
Advertisement
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | DIANE PUCIN
Dominique Moceanu had a smile that danced along with the music when the tiny gymnast, so small she seemed able to perform in the palm of your hand, competed at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. No one had more fun with her sport in Atlanta. No one seemed more suited to the job of being America's pixie. Now, two years later, we see Moceanu again. She is grown up, 17 years old, and there is no smile. There is a lawyer at her side and accusations of financial misdeeds made by her against her father.
WORLD
November 24, 2008 | FROM TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Violations of children's rights are increasing in Afghanistan with more attacks against schools, more children killed and more evidence of child sexual abuse, the United Nations said. The report was compiled using data from agencies working across Afghanistan and anecdotal reports or allegations of violations against children. The report, produced by UNICEF, mentioned the case of a child about 12 years old who was used as a suicide bomber by the Taliban in May.
OPINION
July 30, 2012 | Jim Newton
Last week, when a boy in Los Angeles foster care appeared before Judge Amy Pellman, she welcomed him warmly and clearly knew his history. Pellman asked how his martial-arts class was going, complimented him on his grades and urged him to enroll in a program that would help prepare him for college. Another case that morning involved a 19-year-old woman preparing to emancipate from foster care. She boasted of keeping her grade-point average above 3.0; Pellman called that "awesome. " And when Pellman saw two boys at the back of the court stirring restlessly, she asked if either would like a teddy bear or a book.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2007 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Abused children throughout California and the nation who are undocumented but entitled to green cards are frequently not receiving them -- putting them at risk of deportation and drastically limiting their educational and work opportunities. Under federal law, certain abused, neglected or abandoned dependents of the state are eligible for legal residency, but officials in many counties are unaware of the benefit.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN and JAIME ABDO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Unlike most 6-year-olds, Jimmy Peters rarely smiles enough to show the space where his two front teeth should be. When the teacher called roll in his kindergarten classroom at Circle View Elementary School last year, the youngster often did not respond to his own name. While other children listened to stories or drew pictures, Jimmy sat to the side of his classroom monitored full-time by an aide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sheri Rodino left her husband, she walked out not just on him but on their two young children. She made the young ones, 3-year-old Jessica and 2-year-old Sean, a promise. She said she would call every night before they went to bed. "But there were times I slacked it," the 22-year-old Canyon Country woman said one night this week at the Van Nuys Courthouse. "That hurt them. They'd say, 'Don't you love us, Mommy?' or, 'Aren't we important anymore, Mommy?'
NEWS
August 21, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
A new home test kit can help parents detect the presence of drugs and start children on the road to recovery, a New York company claims. SherTest Corp. launched DrugAlert on Monday, advertising the $49.95 test kit on two-minute television commercials in New York. The company plans to expand the campaign to Los Angeles and other major markets. The test kit is drawing mixed reactions and some concern from legal experts, parents and drug rehabilitation specialists.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're a teenager in Tennessee and have the urge to get, say, your navel pierced this weekend, you'll need to bring along your mom or dad. In Indiana, if you're planning to punch a hole in anything other than your ears, you'll need a note from your parents. You'll need a letter from the parents too if you want to cruise out with your friends in any one of hundreds of American communities after dark this evening.
WORLD
November 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A former child soldier in Sierra Leone's civil war was named an ambassador for the United Nations Children's Fund, vowing to be an advocate for children worldwide, not just in African war zones. Ishmael Beah lost his family in a rebel attack when he was about 12, was kidnapped by Sierra Leone's national army and forced, along with other captured children, to fight a war.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2007 | Richard Verrier;Claudia Eller
His backup plan is a change of scenery -- Shannon has been painting sets in Hollywood for 26 years, most recently for TV shows such as "Cold Case," "Pushing Daisies" and "Without a Trace." He has been able to make good money, earning $100,000 or more a year. Recently, though, the Huntington Beach resident took steps to apply for a contractor's license, concerned that the TV work would dry up and he wouldn't be able to pay his ex-wife the $3,200 a month required for spousal and child support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2007 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Abused children throughout California and the nation who are undocumented but entitled to green cards are frequently not receiving them -- putting them at risk of deportation and drastically limiting their educational and work opportunities. Under federal law, certain abused, neglected or abandoned dependents of the state are eligible for legal residency, but officials in many counties are unaware of the benefit.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The next time you fly into New York's LaGuardia Airport, look out the right side of the plane, and as the wheels touch the runway, you'll see Rikers Island, the largest penal colony in the country. Overflow from the barred ghetto, the population of which is 92% black and Hispanic, floats in the East River on a prison barge. A few miles to the north and west lies the South Bronx, America's poorest congressional district, an area that makes war-ravaged Beirut look like a vacation spot.
NEWS
January 31, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cindy Espinoza took to the gutted, gravelly streets of this barrio last year to campaign for president. Knocking on the doors of cinder-block shanties and wielding a bullhorn to be heard by voters behind barred windows and doors, she pledged to work for better schools, new community services, paved roads and more parks in the crime-infested slum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1999
Contrary to what David Horowitz would like to believe (Commentary, Nov. 26), it's not because of some high-minded stand for principle that the U.S. is today one of the only two nations on Earth to not ratify the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, but instead a campaign of scare stories by far-right anti-U.N. activists. Contrary to what is claimed, the convention recognizes the importance of family and parents. As for it being "unenforceable," a Nov. 18 article described how many nations are making the convention part of their legal codes.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | Associated Press
Revisiting an emotional issue of family law, the state Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether a San Diego man could veto an adoption the day after his child was born. Six of the seven justices, all but Ronald George, voted Thursday to review a lower court ruling that allowed the father, Mark King, to exercise parental rights on the grounds that he had shown a full commitment to assume parental responsibilities after the birth.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You would hardly notice Amit Kumar Prabakhar as he staggers by, his pint-size frame bent double under the weight of a suitcase weighing nearly 80 pounds. Amit's profession, if you can call it one, is working as a coolie at Delhi's Interstate Bus Terminus. It gets chilly in India's capital in winter, but all he wears on his feet are plastic bath clogs. At night, he sleeps on a table. For lugging the overstuffed valise of someone bound for Lucknow or Punjab, Amit pockets around 60 cents.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago this Saturday, the Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted unanimously by the U.N. General Assembly amid predictions it would prove to be a "Magna Carta for children." A decade later, the pact has been formally ratified by every nation save two: Somalia, which hasn't had a functioning government for much of the time since the treaty was adopted, and the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1999 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diana and Robert Loftis could easily have gotten lost in the system. Neglected by their drug-addicted parents, they were placed in foster care while still in grade school. For a decade, they moved from home to home, had countless social workers and attended numerous schools. The only constant in their lives was child advocate Barbara Fowlie. Without her, Diana and Robert say, they would have felt abandoned.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|