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Children S Television

BUSINESS
September 3, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
The Federal Communications Commission said Thursday that it would vote next week on whether to require 414 digital television stations to air educational children's programming, a plan pushed by the agency's Democratic members. The proposal has been opposed by more than 1,000 local TV stations that are members of the National Assn. of Broadcasters. They say it's premature to impose such a requirement during the early stages of U.S. conversion to digital TV. Democrats led by Michael J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
The British Broadcasting Corp. announced Monday that it would phase out ties between its popular children's television characters and fatty or sugary snack foods. Teletubbies chocolate bars, Tweenies chocolate crispies and Fimbles shortcake are to be replaced with healthier products, like yogurt with dried fruit and shaped pasta. The BBC, largely funded by British taxpayers, licenses its children's TV cartoon characters around the world for a variety of products, such as books and videos.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2004 | From Associated Press
Viacom Inc., owner of the CBS, Nickelodeon and MTV television networks, plans to collaborate with Shanghai Media Group on producing children's programs in China's largest city -- the first such joint venture since China opened TV production to foreign investment. Viacom Chief Executive Sumner Redstone said at a news conference in Beijing that his company would have a "huge stake" in the venture, though it's limited by law to a minority share.
NEWS
February 26, 2004 | Elizabeth Jensen
Kids' WB! is moving into live-action shows this summer with its first original movie and a hidden-camera prank show called "Gagsters." The movie, "Zolar," follows a band of semi-pro athletes who discover their newest team member is an alien. It will include cameos from sports stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2003 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
Tune into a PBS station during the day and there's "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood," with beloved TV icon Fred Rogers. The shows, with their quiet reassurance, emotion-exploring songs and puppet vignettes, are the self-effacing legacy of Rogers, who died in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
At a time when commercial broadcasters seem to be decreasing their commitment to children's programming, the Corp. for Public Broadcasting has given its largest single grant for a children's show to fund "The Misadventures of Maya and Miguel," a new PBS animated situation comedy chronicling the lives of 10-year-old Latino twins. It's set to premiere in the fall of 2004. Scholastic Entertainment Inc.
NEWS
March 20, 2003 | Lee Margulies
Ever wonder what the toddlers on Nickelodeon's cartoon series "Rugrats" would be like as adolescents? You'll be able to find out this fall when the cable network unveils "All Grown Up," a spinoff series that features Tommy, Chuckie and the gang as preteens, with 13-year-old Angelica still the older nemesis. That was one of seven new series Nickelodeon announced Wednesday. Others included "Romeo!"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2002 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children's cable network Nickelodeon has drawn fire from a conservative group over an upcoming "Nick News" special that will explore the issue of gay parenting, with comic Rosie O'Donnell and the Rev. Jerry Falwell among the participants. "Nick News Special Edition: My Family Is Different" is scheduled to run in prime time on June 18 and will examine "issues related to diversity, tolerance and respect, particularly to kids of same-sex parented families," according to the network's announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002 | PETER JENSEN, BALTIMORE SUN
Luke Peters likes to play trains. He likes to swim and jump on the backyard trampoline. But if you really want to see this 2-year-old boy get happy, just start singing a certain TV theme song. Bob the Builder. Can we fix it? Bob the Builder. Yes, we can! Never heard of Bob the Builder and his sunny disposition? You probably don't have a preschooler in the house. Bob is big, really big, with the sandbox set. His half-hour show can be seen on Nickelodeon's Nick Jr.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2001 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to compete in the crowded children's television market, NBC and Fox are preparing to call it quits by leasing their Saturday morning TV slots to the highest bidders. The two networks are in serious negotiations with outside programmers, including Nickelodeon, Warner Bros., Discovery Communications, DIC Entertainment, Sony, Pokemon producer 4 Kids Entertainment and Canadian children's television producer Nelvana. None of the parties involved would comment.
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