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Children S Television

ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Barksdale Reading Institute have pledged a combined $11 million to fund the PBS Kids' series "Between the Lions," a learn-to-read program with high success rates in poor, rural communities. Several university studies have shown increases in literacy skills among children who watched the program at schools in Kansas, Mississippi and New Mexico.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The media company behind the PBS hit "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" is working on a new children's television series. Kevin Morrison, chief operating officer of Family Communications Inc., told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that the company is in talks with producers of several children's TV shows about a new program. Morrison said there is no timetable and ideas are still being discussed. One thing it won't be is an updated version of the original show, he said.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
The Parents Television Council, an entertainment watchdog group, has a beef with NBC but not about televising curse words. It's about the word "God." The council wants to know why the network edited out some references to God from "VeggieTales," a popular children's series that airs on NBC on Saturday mornings. The conservative group accuses the network of having a double standard when it comes to Christianity. "NBC has stepped in doodoo again," said Parents Television Council President L.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The PBS Kids Sprout network has fired the host of "The Good Night Show" after learning she had appeared in videos called "Technical Virgin." The host, Melanie Martinez, had alerted network officials about one of the videos late last week, and she was immediately taken off the air.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Rules proposed Friday by the Federal Communications Commission would require broadcasters to air at least three hours of children's educational television programs each week. The proposed rules also would limit on-air broadcasters' use of characters such as Viacom Inc.'s SpongeBob SquarePants to hawk products on the Internet during TV shows. The rules, recommended as part of a three-year transition to digital broadcasting in the U.S., don't apply to cable or satellite TV channels.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2006 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Television watchdogs of all stripes are jumping on the bandwagon of a new parental control package that promises to help parents separate "good" programs from all the rest. The prescreened system from TiVo, called KidZone, uses age-based recommendations from diverse interest groups to help parents cherry-pick which live and recorded shows come into their homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2006 | Matthew O'Rourke and Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writers
Television programming targeted to children ages 5 to 10 contains, on average, almost twice as many violent incidents as prime-time shows geared toward adults, according to a study released Thursday by a conservative media watchdog group.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2006 | Erin Texeira, Associated Press
Each episode of "Dora the Explorer" starts with the animated heroine dashing from her family's hacienda, waving to her Mami and Papi and scooting off into the jungle. "Ready to explore?" asks the brave and curious 7-year-old. "Vamos arriba!" Just about everyone in Dora's world speaks fluent English and Spanish, their adventures are punctuated by salsa rhythms -- and young TV viewers can't get enough of the mix.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
After trading lawsuits this fall, children advocacy groups and entertainment industry representatives have agreed on new rules for digital television that would require broadcasters to expand children's educational TV programming and limit the use of the Internet for promotional tie-ins. In return, broadcasters would be allowed greater flexibility to preempt the educational shows for live sports on weekends.
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