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Children S Television

BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER and BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When two titans of television--Rupert Murdoch and Haim Saban--formed Fox Family Worldwide five years ago, they took on the Disney Channel and Nickelodeon. Saban brought a library that included "Mighty Morphin Power Rangers," and Murdoch contributed News Corp.'s weekday and Saturday morning blocks on the Fox network in a 50-50 partnership that was going to dominate kids TV. Together they bought a cable channel to expand their reach beyond their competitors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelvana Ltd.--a little production company pitted against the likes of Disney, Time Warner, News Corp. and Viacom--no doubt feels that Oscar-nominated song from "South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut" possesses a grain of truth: "Blame Canada."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Its universe draws you in, like a long forgotten scent from childhood that makes you feel right at home. A sunny place where life is experienced at a leisurely pace and innocence is regained through the healing influence of warmth and friendship. It's the world of "Little Bear," the animated children's series on Nick Jr., the morning programming block on Nickelodeon that's designed for younger children.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2000 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TV writer-producer Tom Lynch walked through the chic suburban living room set of his new series "100 Deeds of Eddie McDowd" talking up his talking dog. "It's a commentary on good and bad," Lynch said of the show about a neighborhood bully morphed into a canine who must perform the requisite toll of good turns before regaining human form. "Eddie's a bad kid who's not too sure what good is." The dog's no joke to Lynch and his partner-brother John. The Lynches are poised to become the No.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | PAUL LIEBERMAN and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There is a notion out there that television--with its bag of fast-paced tricks making today's children virtual junkies for overstimulation--will be the death of reading, if it hasn't already done the deed. But it's also been clear--for the last three decades, at least--that television's formidable powers can serve the cause of literacy as well. So PBS stations nationwide today will launch a series that may be the medium's most ambitious effort ever to help children learn to read.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2000 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's a problem for "Arthur" to ponder in an upcoming episode: What impact will the unfolding financial woes of the series' co-producer, Montreal-based Cinar Corp., have on the future of the PBS children's series? The answer could mean a lot to the Public Broadcasting Service. The animated "Arthur," based on the best-selling books, is PBS' top-rated children's show, and by PBS calculations, the most-watched children's show on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to build on its "Pokemon"-powered success among kids and especially boys, the WB network has made a deal for a new animated series based on the comic book "X-Men," which could benefit from catching the coattails of a big-budget feature film due this summer. If "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" brought ABC a complete reversal of its prime-time fortune, "Pokemon" has done much the same for the WB in the kids ratings race.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the Federal Trade Commission's monolith of cement and steel, some of the agency's finest lawyers are reading not only Legal Times but Billboard, Daily Variety and the Hollywood Reporter. They are poring over lists of more than 15,000 films rated since 1968, watching MTV videos and perusing gory computer games. Next month, they plan to take a field trip to San Luis Obispo to hear actor Ernest Borgnine at a forum on violence in the movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1999 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fiona Phillips just wants to be a normal teenager, living aboard her mother's rock 'n' roll tour bus, surfing the Net and squabbling with her older brother like any other kid. So why does she keep bumping into spirits, astral beings and other creepy things? We'll begin to understand why life's so strange for Fiona when Disney Channel's family adventure series "So Weird" returns Friday night for its new season.
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