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Childrens Rights

ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1992 | RAY LOYND
Chris Burke, whose character on the series "Life Goes On" has helped heighten sensitivity to the mentally and physically handicapped, steps into a featured movie role as a boy with Down's syndrome who becomes the center of a major court battle involving children's rights in "Jonathan: The Boy Nobody Wanted" (at 9 tonight on NBC, Channels 4, 36 and 39). JoBeth Williams co-stars as a passionate social service volunteer who takes the boy out of a shelter for impaired children and into her own home.
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NEWS
October 18, 1992 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billy's mother was frequently drunk and had difficulty controlling her 13-year-old son. Then she discovered a sure-fire technique: She committed him to a mental hospital near their Bay Area home. He remained locked up for 2 1/2 months, even when doctors declared the boy was the more stable of the two. No one but his mother had the right to release him. Finally last year, Billy ran away.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
A judge on Friday ruled in favor of a 12-year-old boy who set a legal precedent by going to court to "divorce" the biological parents he said had mistreated and abandoned him. Circuit Judge Thomas S. Kirk told Gregory Kingsley that he was now formally adopted by his foster parents. "Gregory, you're the son of Mr. and Mrs. Russ at this moment," he said as people in the courtroom broke into applause. Gregory leaped to hug his new parents and four of his new siblings.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
A 12-year-old boy went to court Thursday seeking a "divorce" from his parents. Gregory Kingsley sat in the courtroom with members of the foster family that he hopes to live with permanently. His mother, Rachel Kingsley, cried as she denied allegations that she abused, neglected and abandoned him for most of his life. In the past eight years, Gregory has lived with her for seven months.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months ago, Mark and Stephanie had a baby. She was 16. He was 22. Over his objection, she gave the baby up for adoption. A San Diego couple, John and Peggy, became the guardians of little Michael, intending to adopt him. John and Peggy were even there in the delivery room with Stephanie, who had fled Arizona to get away from Mark--who is still there, working a factory night shift, swearing that he is making something of himself, that his drug problem is over and that he wants his son.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
In a significant victory for children's rights advocates, a judge ruled Thursday that an 11-year-old boy can legally seek a "divorce" from his parents so he can be adopted by a foster family. Circuit Judge Thomas S. Kirk, acting in his capacity as a juvenile judge, said the boy identified only as Gregory K. has the same constitutional right to protect his fundamental interests in court as an adult.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The New York state Assembly passed a bill banning surrogate parenting for payment. The bill now goes to Gov. Mario M. Cuomo, who expressed support for it. If signed, New York would become the 18th state to prohibit the practice in some form. Democratic Assemblywoman Helene Weinstein said: "The bill makes a statement that in New York, we don't believe that children should be treated as commodities to be bought and sold."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1992 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hillary Clinton returned Thursday to the turf that gave her husband's presidential campaign an unlikely boost last year, shuttling into Orange County to spread her gospel of renewed family values, women's rights and support for children. The wife of presidential hopeful Bill Clinton talked with teen-agers at a Santa Ana high school and spoke at a $100-a-plate political fund-raiser, repeatedly stressing that she wants to be a "voice for children" in America.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Destini knows there isn't much time. At 7, she's aware of her mother's illness; she understands the word AIDS . When her mother dies, Destini and her 2-year-old sister Chassidy will have a new, adoptive family, she says. Their mother fears she won't find that family in time. As she fights the diseases that tax her depleted immune system, 25-year-old Tanya Shaw races against a frightening deadline.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to do for children in the 1990s what the environmental movement did for the Earth in the 1970s, an unusually broad coalition of interest groups on Wednesday unveiled a "children's platform" of political issues for California's 7.8 million residents who are too young to vote.
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