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Chile Agriculture

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BUSINESS
March 16, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL
An accident of nature and an industrious population account for Chile's meteoric rise to chief supplier of winter fruit to North America, according to importers that supply the U.S. market. A quick look at a globe explains why. Geographically, Chile and California are mirror images. And when the growing season comes to the farther reaches of the Southern Hemisphere, California's vineyards and orchards are largely dormant. In other words, when it's summer in Santiago, it's winter in California.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. International Trade Commission on Monday threw out an anti-dumping case filed by California table grape growers against Mexican and Chilean farmers, ending a tense dispute that many saw as an important test for trade relations in the Western Hemisphere. Critics had said the California petition was an example of how industries, including steel, lumber, and sugar, try to use U.S.
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BUSINESS
March 15, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Stevedores in Los Angeles temporarily refused to unload a refrigerated freighter from Chile on Tuesday as dockworkers, fruit wholesalers, grocers and growers confronted the government's new warning against tainted fruit. The dockworkers relented later in the day after government inspectors declared the cargo safe for handling. The cargo was unloaded, but it remains detained at the Port of Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 30, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Raspberries from Guatemala and Chile are suspected of causing an outbreak of 90 cases of cyclospora in five states in the last two months, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. It's the second time in as many years that imported raspberries have been blamed for cases of the intestinal illness. The recent cases were reported in California, Florida, Nevada, New York and Texas at events such as luncheons and weddings.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
Chile's fruit isn't the first to fall prey to sabotage. In 1978, a dozen Europeans in at least three countries became ill after eating Israeli oranges, lemons and grapefruit that had been tainted with mercury. A group of Palestinian extremists took responsibility for the poisoning, saying its goal was to "sabotage the Israeli economy." Europe responded by boycotting Israeli citrus for a time, dealing a heavy blow to that nation's fragile finances.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
One afternoon nearly three years ago, in the midst of a nationwide Tylenol cyanide scare, Dr. Frank E. Young, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, could hardly control his wrath over the idea that someone would tamper with products purchased by American consumers. "This kind of terrorism is just like a burglary," he told a reporter. "In this case, the burglar burglarizes our trust. I get angry that someone would do this to us as citizens."
BUSINESS
August 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fruit Inspection Fee: Fifteen importers of Chilean fruit and vegetables sued Los Angeles County, the Board of Supervisors and the county agricultural commissioner, claiming that the companies are being charged an illegal mandatory inspection fee for some produce. The Los Angeles Superior Court case said the county last August approved an inspection fee of 3 1/2 cents per package on some imported fruits, nuts and vegetables to be sold in California.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The government of Chile and the World Bank have pledged financial backing to compensate for losses that resulted from the Bush Administration's five-day ban on Chilean fruit, officials representing Chilean exporters and U.S. importers announced Thursday.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The federal government's decision to temporarily ban imported Chilean fruit after the discovery of two cyanide-laced grapes was widely supported by the American public, according to a Times Poll. The survey asked 1,158 adults nationwide to evaluate the Food and Drug Administration's response to the tainted grapes found in a shipment in Philadelphia: Did it overreact or was the move a prudent exercise of caution? Sixty-eight percent of those questioned thought the government had acted prudently.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Federal officials on Friday strongly defended the method they have chosen to ensure that fruit imported from Chile is safe, saying that a random sampling of 5% of the grapes and berries should be enough to detect any poison. But many of the details of the inspection system must still be worked out and the fact remains that, even when the system finally is in place, 95% of the fruit will not be looked at by inspectors.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case of the "poisoned grapes" once again has Chileans bursting with pent-up wrath: Newly revealed evidence supports Chilean arguments that a 1989 poison scare, which resulted in a costly U.S. ban on Chilean fruit, was triggered by a hoax. In March, 1989, an anonymous caller told the U.S. Embassy in Santiago that Chilean fruit shipped to the United States had been poisoned.
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California businessman Warren Simmons is betting big on cranberries. He's investing millions of dollars to plant 1,000 acres of cranberries in this nation, where the fruit has never been produced commercially. Simmons hopes to become a major cranberry producer--maybe even No. 1 in the world. He also hopes that juice from his crop can be sold in Europe or Asia--where hardly anyone now thirsts for the product. Can it be done? That depends on many things, including bugs and bumblebees.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a busy summer day in a sun-splashed orchard, workers hurry to harvest a bumper crop of plump and blushing nectarines, spilling them from baskets into a trailer parked between rows of trees. A tractor will take the nectarines to a nearby packing plant, where they will cool off in a huge refrigeration chamber. In a few days, after sorting and packing, the fruit will be trucked to Valparaiso and loaded on refrigerated ships going to the United States and other countries.
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | From Associated Press
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is not responsible for $210 million lost by Chilean fruit growers when their products were banned during a cyanide scare in 1989, a federal judge has ruled. The scare began when anonymous callers to the U.S. Embassy in Santiago, Chile, claimed that fruit exported to the United States would be injected with cyanide. The FDA reported March 12, 1989, that it had found cyanide in two grapes taken from a ship docked in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration acted appropriately and within its legal authority in responding to the March, 1989, Chilean grape poisoning scare, the General Accounting Office has concluded in a draft report obtained Tuesday by The Times. The investigation was requested last year by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), who was concerned about the economic impact of the FDA's actions. The congressional watchdog agency's draft report was completed in August but has not yet been released by Helms' office.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fruit Inspection Fee: Fifteen importers of Chilean fruit and vegetables sued Los Angeles County, the Board of Supervisors and the county agricultural commissioner, claiming that the companies are being charged an illegal mandatory inspection fee for some produce. The Los Angeles Superior Court case said the county last August approved an inspection fee of 3 1/2 cents per package on some imported fruits, nuts and vegetables to be sold in California.
NEWS
March 31, 1989
Chilean police said that two cyanide-tainted grapes that prompted a five-day U.S. embargo on Chilean fruit were poisoned en route to or in the United States but not in Chile. Gen. Fernando Paredes, investigative police chief, said preliminary results of laboratory tests showed that grapes injected with cyanide in Chile would have rotted before reaching the United States. Authorities said full testing would take about a month. The U.S.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
U.S. and Chilean officials working to resolve the Chilean fruit crisis indicated Thursday that they are nearing an agreement on a plan to protect the safety of future imports from that nation. But they said that they remain stymied over what to do with all the produce that has arrived here since the discovery of two poisoned grapes earlier this week.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Bo Mesing--only his banker knows him as John, he says--has been in the organic produce business for a decade. Last year, deciding to break fresh ground, he lined up eight farmers in Chile to grow organic cantaloupes to import through his new firm, Certified Organic. Once unloaded in Los Angeles, the fruit would be distributed by Rainbow Natural Foods, a Denver firm specializing in organic fruits and vegetables whose Los Angles operation Mesing manages.
NEWS
March 31, 1989
Chilean police said that two cyanide-tainted grapes that prompted a five-day U.S. embargo on Chilean fruit were poisoned en route to or in the United States but not in Chile. Gen. Fernando Paredes, investigative police chief, said preliminary results of laboratory tests showed that grapes injected with cyanide in Chile would have rotted before reaching the United States. Authorities said full testing would take about a month. The U.S.
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