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Chile Elections

NEWS
August 14, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
With a media barrage and the muscle of incumbency, Chile's military government is mounting a deft campaign to extend its rule for eight more years. An alliance of opposition parties complains that abuses of power abound in the government's drive to attract support in the coming yes-or-no plebiscite on the military's nominee for president.
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NEWS
March 13, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stadium that once served as a torture and detention center, 80,000 Chileans on Monday celebrated the return of democracy and cheered their newly inaugurated president's words: "Never Again!" Patricio Aylwin, sworn in Sunday to succeed military ruler Augusto Pinochet, presided over a two-hour fiesta in the National Stadium in Santiago, where thousands were held prisoner in the months after a coup by the armed forces and police on Sept. 11, 1973.
NEWS
October 8, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Several hundred thousand Chileans turned out Friday for a joyous victory party, celebrating Gen. Augusto Pinochet's defeat with songs, chants and dances including the "Waltz of the No." The opposition coalition hurriedly organized what it called the "Fiesta for Democracy and Reconciliation" in a park here to let people unleash emotions generated by Pinochet's trouncing in Wednesday's presidential plebiscite.
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
By Chilean standards, the violence surrounding Gen. Augusto Pinochet's presidential nomination Tuesday was not exceptional. But in a supercharged political climate, with Pinochet's supporters and foes maneuvering to portray themselves as the hope for a peaceful and stable future, both sides agree that such unrest could play a significant role in the five-week campaign.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters chose Christian Democrat Eduardo Frei as Chile's next president by a wide margin Saturday, according to exit polls and official returns, signaling a solid endorsement of the center-left coalition that has governed since the end of military rule in 1990. Official returns from more than 90% of all polling stations nationwide gave Frei 58% of the vote against 24% for conservative candidate Arturo Alessandri. Four other presidential candidates were far behind, with no more than 6.5% each.
NEWS
October 9, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Angry reporters sought guarantees from Chile's military government on Saturday that they could work safely after 23 journalists, most of them photographers, were beaten by police while covering opposition rallies following Wednesday's presidential plebiscite. The U.S. and Argentine embassies also pressed authorities for an end to such beatings. "We have expressed our concern and police assure us that an investigation is under way," a U.S. spokesman said in Santiago.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
In a climate of tension and rumors of looming conflict, Chileans decide today whether to give Gen. Augusto Pinochet eight more years in power or to resume multi-party democratic rule. The government assured a fair ballot--a simple yes-or-no vote on Pinochet, the lone candidate. The opposition coalition expressed confidence that the plebiscite would be untainted by fraud, thanks to elaborate safeguards, including two parallel computerized tallies.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No matter what happens in today's presidential election, Chile will make history. If Ricardo Lagos wins, he will become the first Socialist president since Salvador Allende was overthrown by a U.S.-backed military coup in 1973 and died as planes bombed the presidential palace. If Joaquin Lavin wins, he will become the first rightist president since Gen. Augusto Pinochet obeyed the wishes of the voters following a 1988 referendum and relinquished power after more than 16 years of dictatorship.
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