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WORLD
September 12, 2013 | By Maryrose Fison
SANTIAGO, Chile -- Lighting candles, singing songs and carrying placards with photos of victims, Chileans gathered outside Santiago's national football stadium to honor the thousands tortured and killed following the military coup that 40 years ago overthrew President Salvador Allende. Hundreds of demonstrators laid red flowers Wednesday night at the gates of the stadium where many of the 4,000 victims killed or disappeared under the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet met their fate.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Some California marinas, particularly those north of Los Angeles, could see small wave action over the next day as a result of the 8.2 Chilean earthquake and tsunami. Kathy Hoxsie, a meteorologist with the NWS Oxnard, said “one-foot tide fluctuations” occurred in the Santa Barbara harbor as of about 7:45 a.m. Such tides were unlikely to damage boats in the harbor, she said. The Ventura harbor also experienced three-to-four knot fluctuations in its currents, as well as swirling water, Hoxsie said.
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WORLD
March 8, 2010 | By Daniel Hernandez
This capital city grappled with conflicting emotions over the weekend as Chile slowly recovers from one of the strongest earthquakes recorded: tears and jokes, dancing and chanting and a strong show of solidarity for victims in the most severely punished parts of the country. In crowded cafes, barbershops and even during a drag show in Santiago's bohemian Bellavista district, Chileans were using humor and a toughened cool to deal with life on a part of Earth that never quite wants to be still.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Small tsunami waves and other unusual "water movements" arrived on the California coast Wednesday following an 8.2 earthquake that struck Chile's northern coast. Although officials stressed that no tsunami warning had been issued for California or the West Coast, the abnormal wave heights, tide fluctuations and current changes may have surprised boaters, they said. The first waves to strike California that were connected to Tuesday night's South American earthquake may have hit La Jolla about 4 a.m., said Bill Knight, an oceanographer with the National Tsunami Warning Center based in Alaska.
FOOD
February 2, 2012 | By Linda Burum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Stick your fork into Chilenazo's pastel de choclo and you hit culinary pay dirt. A saucy, chunky, herb-laden filling sits beneath the souffléed fresh corn crust of this majestic pie-like concoction that comes steaming to the table in an individual earthenware bowl. Deep below its puffy exterior is braised chicken interspersed with pino , a blend of onions nearly caramelized with ground beef then punctuated with fresh basil, raisins and hard-cooked egg. It's a flavor fusion that upholds the pastel 's reputation as Chile's national dish.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
A final reckoning of the Pinochet dictatorship's 16-year reign of terror may be many years away, but a flourishing of art, theater, film and literary works dealing with the nightmarish era is a sure sign that Chilean society is coming to grips with what happened and how. Recent works that explore Chile's dark chapter include smash television series such as "The Cardinal's Archives" and "The '80s. " The first show dramatized the Catholic Church's resistance to state terror while the other tracked one family's experience of the police state over time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Two and a half years ago, Ana Tijoux tore up the rule book of Latin hip-hop with her breakout record, "1977. " The title alluded to Tijoux's generation of Chileans whose parents had fled the brutal 17-year regime of Gen. Augusto Pinochet and had gone into European exile. Tijoux's equally ambitious follow-up, "La Bala" (The Bullet), released in January in the United States, gave a sympathetic shout-out to Chile's recent wave of youth-led street protests demanding education reforms and attacking the country's growing gulf between rich and poor.
SPORTS
May 8, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR and SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, Times Staff Writers
Guatemala is not a wealthy country. When its national soccer team said it was short of money recently in its quest to reach the 1990 World Cup finals, the players and managers asked their compatriots in "El Norte" for help. The Guatemalan community of Los Angeles did not let them down. In the past four months, workers and businessmen have contributed $5, $10 and $100 apiece--raising about $7,000 solely to supplement player salaries. The funds were given to team members in a Huntington Park ceremony Saturday night in showing that despite the distance, Guatemalan immigrants have not lost their obsession with their homeland's national sport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1987 | HERNAN FELIPE ERRAZURIZ, Hernan Felipe Errazuriz is Chile's ambassador to the United States.
When Pope John Paul II arrives in Chile for the first time in his papacy this week, he will find a country that is gradually moving toward the restoration of representative democracy after nearly falling into the clutches of atheistic communism. Chile became the only nation in the world to break the shackles of totalitarian communism when its armed forces intervened on behalf of its predominantly God-fearing populace in 1973 to overthrow Marxist Salvador Allende.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1988 | L. FRANCIS BOUCHEY, L. Francis Bouchey is the president of the Council for Inter-American Security, an in-dependent research institute in Washington
As expected, President Augusto Pinochet is the choice of Chile's military chiefs to be the sole candidate in next month's yes-or-no presidential plebiscite. And, as expected, hundreds of thousands of Chileans have demonstrated in the capital to urge a no vote. This might lead outsiders to expect Pinochet to be rejected in the Oct. 5 balloting. In fact, his stature has risen sharply in the past year, and his prospects for an honest victory look excellent.
WORLD
December 15, 2013 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
SANTIAGO, Chile -- Former President Michelle Bachelet was elected to a new term as Chile's leader in a landslide victory Sunday, becoming the first woman to be reelected chief executive in the nation's history. With 90% of votes counted, she led her conservative opponent, former Labor Minister Evelyn Matthei, 62.3% to 37.7%. Representing the New Majority coalition of parties, the 62-year-old pediatrician leveraged her high standing with Chileans during and after her first four-year term, which ended in 2010, to coast to victory.
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
No traces of poison were found during tests of the exhumed remains of Chilean Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda, forensics experts reported Friday after a six-month investigation. The revered South American poet and avowed communist died just 12 days after the Sept. 11, 1973, coup that deposed his friend and fellow leftist, Chilean President Salvador Allende. Although suffering from prostate cancer, Neruda's sudden turn for the worse in his final days stirred suspicions that he might have been murdered by the right-wing regime of Gen. Augusto Pinochet.
WORLD
September 12, 2013 | By Maryrose Fison
SANTIAGO, Chile -- Lighting candles, singing songs and carrying placards with photos of victims, Chileans gathered outside Santiago's national football stadium to honor the thousands tortured and killed following the military coup that 40 years ago overthrew President Salvador Allende. Hundreds of demonstrators laid red flowers Wednesday night at the gates of the stadium where many of the 4,000 victims killed or disappeared under the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet met their fate.
WORLD
September 5, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - With the 40th anniversary of the overthrow of Chilean President Salvador Allende approaching, it's evident that scars from the violence and human rights abuses committed during and after the military coup are still raw. The family of folk singer Victor Jara, one of the best known of the more than 4,000 people who were killed and disappeared in the Sept. 11, 1973 coup, filed a civil suit Wednesday night against one of his alleged killers, a former Chilean army lieutenant now living in Florida.
OPINION
May 1, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Somewhere between her Chilean family's life-or-death political realities and its intuitive, fantastical imagination is where Isabel Allende writes. Where she lives is the Bay Area, arriving in California about 25 years ago with a famous surname she's gone on to burnish, novel by novel. As perhaps befits an emigre author, Allende's books are routinely translated into two dozen languages. Here she muses in English about what the future of the written word holds for authors like her, and for the readers who love them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Whatever happened to magic realism? The question arises when dipping into "Maya's Notebook," Isabel Allende's bruising, cinematically vivid new novel. It's an exercise in gritty realism rather than the fanciful folkloricism that Allende has been known for, accurately or not, since her fictional debut, "The House of the Spirits," 30 years ago. Magic realism always was more of a publishers' marketing coinage than an apt description of the works of the so-called Latin American Boom, which looms over Spanish-language literature like Easter Island monoliths: Mario Vargas Llosa, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes and Gabriel García Márquez.
SPORTS
May 6, 1989 | CHRIS BAKER, Times Staff Writer
It's too bad that Bob Gansler, coach of the United States soccer team didn't get to see Friday night's match between Guatemala and Chile at the Coliseum. Why? Gansler could have learned from watching Chile win, 1-0, because Guatemala is one of the teams that the United States will face in World Cup qualifying. Sigi Schmidt, UCLA soccer coach, scouted the match for the U.S. and will brief Gansler, who'll be here for Sunday's match between Guatemala and Paraguay. In the second game Friday night, Paraguay defeated El Salvador, 2-1. How did the Chileans neutralize Guatemala?
TRAVEL
April 14, 1996
Muchas gracias, John Muncie, for your marvelous article on "Pablo Neruda's Chile" (March 17). This poet has long been my favorite. It so happens that an organization of which my wife and I are members, the Friendship Force of Los Angeles (telephone: [818] 348-2808 or [818] 998-3290), is planning a trip to Chile in November, when we will stay in homes of Chileans who are also members. Earlier, in September, we'll welcome Chileans in our homes. I've been reading Neruda's memoirs, glorious writing sheds much light on the fauna and animals of Chile.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Violeta Parra grew up in poverty in rural Chile and became an internationally recognized musician, her songs covered by such luminaries as Joan Baez and Shakira. With its grand arc, her story would fit nicely into the standard biopic format, but director Andrés Wood wisely opts for a more impressionistic approach in "Violeta Went to Heaven. " His feature matches its subject in turbulence and intensity, scrambling chronology in a revelatory way. Francisca Gavilán's lead performance burns with a dark radiance that's anything but self-congratulatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Beto Cuevas already is a rock star, a poet and a pop-culture idol in his native Chile. So what does he really want to do? Paint. The former lead singer for the band La Ley, from the late '80s to the early 2000s, and subsequently a successful solo artist, Cuevas is among South American rock's most durable talents. He's still recording, and he's a regular fixture at Latin music awards shows. PHOTOS: Iconic rock guitars and their owners But according to a story in the Mexico City newspaper El Universal, Cuevas is eager for his fans to see another side of him, as a visual artist who has accumulated a trove of paintings and drawings over the years.
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