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Chili Palmer

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1995 | JORDAN LEVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Across a table on his patio, the real Chili Palmer is working "the look"--mouth a tight line, heavy-lidded eyes drooping to coldly ominous slits. Then he blinks. His mouth twitches, first one corner, then the other, then curls into an unwilling smile. "Aaahhh," he says, throwing down his cigarette and giving up. "Well, back then I didn't have people sitting there giggling at me."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Mike Downey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Raylan A Novel Elmore Leonard William Morrow: 261 pp., $26.99 The Jaguar A Charlie Hood Novel T. Jefferson Parker Dutton: 359 pp., $26.95 A watermelon picker, Vince Majestyk. A bail bondsman, Max Cherry. A bank robber, Jack Foley. A mean hombre , John Russell. A deadeye lawman, Bob Valdez. The villainous heroes and heroic villains of Elmore Leonard's imagination have come in countless forms - some, such as these, brought to life in motion pictures by Charles Bronson, Robert Forster, George Clooney, Paul Newman and Burt Lancaster, good good guy/bad guy portrayers all. Ordered at gunpoint to identify my favorite Leonard do-badders of 40 books and beyond, I might need to score it a tie between Chili Palmer, a loan shark-turned-Hollywood player in "Get Shorty," and a newspaper reporter from its sequel, "Be Cool," who turns up in the last chapter, "Mike Downey of the Los Angeles Times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Mike Downey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Raylan A Novel Elmore Leonard William Morrow: 261 pp., $26.99 The Jaguar A Charlie Hood Novel T. Jefferson Parker Dutton: 359 pp., $26.95 A watermelon picker, Vince Majestyk. A bail bondsman, Max Cherry. A bank robber, Jack Foley. A mean hombre , John Russell. A deadeye lawman, Bob Valdez. The villainous heroes and heroic villains of Elmore Leonard's imagination have come in countless forms - some, such as these, brought to life in motion pictures by Charles Bronson, Robert Forster, George Clooney, Paul Newman and Burt Lancaster, good good guy/bad guy portrayers all. Ordered at gunpoint to identify my favorite Leonard do-badders of 40 books and beyond, I might need to score it a tie between Chili Palmer, a loan shark-turned-Hollywood player in "Get Shorty," and a newspaper reporter from its sequel, "Be Cool," who turns up in the last chapter, "Mike Downey of the Los Angeles Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1995 | JORDAN LEVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Across a table on his patio, the real Chili Palmer is working "the look"--mouth a tight line, heavy-lidded eyes drooping to coldly ominous slits. Then he blinks. His mouth twitches, first one corner, then the other, then curls into an unwilling smile. "Aaahhh," he says, throwing down his cigarette and giving up. "Well, back then I didn't have people sitting there giggling at me."
NEWS
November 10, 1996 | Kenneth Turan
A 1995 light comedy set in an amoral setting, adapted from the Elmore Leonard's novel. At the center of it all, an island of calm with every hair carefully razor cut, is Chili Palmer, a hard guy with a soft heart. John Travolta (left) plays him as a Mafioso Cary Grant in a black leather coat, and the fit is perfect. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito (right) and Rene Russo (center) co-star (Showtime Monday at 8 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Heineken, the Dutch brewer that hired Brad Pitt to star in a commercial during this month's Super Bowl, has signed "Pulp Fiction" actor John Travolta to promote its namesake brew in a new ad as the company strives to spur U.S. sales growth. The commercial will be a play on Travolta's role as former gangster Chili Palmer in "Be Cool," the sequel to the 1995 comedy "Get Shorty," Heineken Chief Financial Officer Rene Hooft Graafland said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Ten years ago, the amusing "Get Shorty," based on the Elmore Leonard novel, introduced John Travolta as Chili Palmer, a Miami loan shark and movie fan, who on a trip to L.A. became convinced the motion picture business was a snap compared to wheeling and dealing in the underworld. Palmer is back in "Be Cool," and although Travolta is as smooth as ever, the picture is a bust, a grimly unfunny comedy with no connection to reality, and worst of all, running on and on for two dismal hours.
BOOKS
June 2, 1991
GET SHORTY by Elmore Leonard (Dell: $5.99). Miami loan shark Chili Palmer's former occupational skills come in handy when he makes a career change to tinsel- town deal-maker. RUSH by Kim Wozencraft (Ivy: $5.95). Fictionalized account of the author, a former undercover narc agent, and her partner/boyfriend taking their work home with them. HAMMERHEADS by Dale Brown (Berkley: $5.95). Government disbands usual drug-enforcement agencies and relies on the tactics of an elite Prohibition squad.
SPORTS
May 9, 2002 | BOB MIESZERSKI
Because of his performance in a trial Saturday night, Lonely Moon Sign is the 2-year-old to beat in the $361,000 Kindergarten FuturityMay 18 at Los Alamitos. Owned by Jesus and Sandra Soto and trained by Donna McArthur, the son of Royal Quick Dash proved his debut win last month was no fluke by winning his trial by 13/4 lengths in 15.44 seconds for 300 yards, making him the fastest of 10 qualifiers for the Kindergarten.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan
Elmore Leonard populated his novels with con men, hustlers and killers, with names like Chili, Stick and Ordell. He plunged readers into a sea of urban sleaze, spiking his tales with mordant humor and moral ambivalence. In stories often set in Detroit or South Florida, he betrayed a love for down-and-out characters and pitch-perfect dialogue. A line from his novel “Be Cool” makes a point in typical Leonard style: “'Chili Palmer's a talker,'” Nick said. “ 'That's what he does, he talks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1995 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I hear what you're tellin' me and you're wrong," John Travolta is saying, lounging in a barber's chair, halfheartedly reading the Miami Herald. "It was 'Rio Bravo.' " "We're talking John Wayne and Dean Martin and the blond chick, what's her name," replies his buddy in the other chair. "Played a lady cop on TV." "Angie Dickinson," mutters Travolta. "It was 'El Dorado,' " says his companion. Travolta sighs. "Five bucks says you don't know what the [expletive] you're talking about."
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