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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
EXCLUSIVE: Hollywood studios have become accustomed to deleting scenes for Chinese censors. But it's not often that footage is explicitly added for the Asian nation. In a rare switch, two versions of the Joseph Gordon-Levitt time-travel film “Looper” will be released - with the longer, more Shanghai-centric edition coming out in Chinese theaters. Directed by the high-concept auteur Rian Johnson (“Brick”), “Looper” follows a hit man (Gordon-Levitt) who is charged with offing targets sent from the future but finds himself in a quandary after he is ordered to kill his future self (Bruce Willis)
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WORLD
April 25, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
SEOUL -- President Obama conceded Friday that sanctions on Russia may not force President Vladimir Putin to alter his decisions on Ukraine, but he then offered a spirited defense of how they might still influence a leader he said is “not a stupid man.” Putin surely realizes that sanctions have hurt the Russian economy, Obama said, and knows there is much more pain ahead if he doesn't live up to his pledge to ease tensions in Ukraine, where Russian-speaking...
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NEWS
December 2, 2001 | MARTIN FACKLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mrs. Liu could have had three daughters by now. But the shame and legal costs would have been unbearable, so she gave her second daughter away at birth and aborted a third when an ultrasound scan showed that fetus, too, was female. In 1949, the Communist Party took power promising to end centuries of degradation for China's women. Yet hundreds of thousands of unwanted baby girls are abandoned, aborted and even killed each year. For poor, rural families, the choice is as stark as it is cruel.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
TOKYO - During a long day in the coded world of Japanese diplomacy, President Obama's easiest conversation Thursday was with a robot. “I can kick a soccer ball,” said the Honda humanoid to the president. “OK, come on,” replied Obama, who caught the kick with his foot and complimented the metallic athlete. “That was pretty impressive.” Besides offering the least complicated interaction of the day, the demonstration at the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation also had Obama in a comfort zone, focusing on science, technology and the opportunity for collaboration with a top American ally and trade partner.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
China announced a 9.57% devaluation of its currency, beginning this weekend. The buying rate will change from 4.71 yuan to the dollar to 5.21, and the selling rate from the previous 4.73 yuan to the dollar to 5.24. Last December, the Chinese yuan was devalued by 21.2%. China's currency is not convertible on world money markets. The new rate is still slightly below the black-market rate.
WORLD
September 28, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - He was a gentle, if somewhat befuddled man. He couldn't keep track of his money or figure out how to take the bus, but he was a lot of fun when he'd roll around with the children, playing, tickling and laughing. "He was just like one of the kids," said retired painter Zheng Shuang, 76, recalling her uncle. In fact, dajiu , or big uncle, as they called him, was so unpretentious that Zheng's younger brother wouldn't believe it when she told him, "Did you know that big uncle was the last emperor of China?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1997
China promises "one country, two systems." Why don't we offer most- favored-nation trade status to Hong Kong but not China? DENNIS H. CHEN Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2010
'Nixon in China' What: Long Beach Opera Where: Terrace Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach When: 8 p.m. March 20 and 4 p.m. March 28 Price: $5 to $95 Contact: (562) 435-2994, www.longbeachopera.org Running time: 3 hours, 30 minutes
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - A Chinese government crackdown on “lewd and pornographic” content has ensnared Internet giant Sina.com, with authorities saying Thursday that inappropriate articles and videos were found on the portal and that the company would be stripped of its online publication and video licenses. The National Office Against Pornographic and Illegal Publications said tips from the public led to the discovery of 20 articles and four videos on the site that violated regulations. "Some of these articles were as long as 500-plus chapters and clocked millions of clicks ... imperiling social morals and seriously harming minors' physical and mental health," the statement said.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Julie Makinen
TOKYO - Declaring that "the United States is and always will be a Pacific nation," President Obama launched an Asia tour designed to assure leaders of ally nations that they have a strong U.S. backup at a time of rising regional tension. Appearing with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday morning, Obama said the "U.S.-Japan alliance is the foundation not only for our security in the Asia-Pacific region but also for the region as a whole. " He later said the U.S. security treaty with Japan "covers all territories under Japan's administration, including the Senkaku islands," but reiterated that Washington did not take a position on competing claims of sovereignty.
AUTOS
April 22, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Thanking his Chinese customers for “taking a chance,” Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk on Tuesday handed over the keys to the first nine electric vehicles the California car company has sold in the country. Plugging in a Model S at Tesla's first “supercharger” station in front of the company's offices in northeast Beijing, Musk vowed to build a nationwide network of the high-speed chargers -- which can deliver enough power for a 340-mile journey in about an hour -- “as fast as we can.” “We want to make sure people are able to travel almost anywhere within China using the supercharger network,” he said.
OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By Daniel K. Gardner
Premier Li Keqiang wants to wean the Chinese economy off its dependence on export trade in cheap electronics, clothes, toys and tchotchkes of all variety. Let the Chinese people consume instead, he says, and let them consume products and services of high value. But how do you take a developing country like China, where saving has traditionally been favored over spending, and transform it into a nation of mass consumers? Simple, Li explains: You urbanize it, because city dwellers earn much more and spend much more.
WORLD
April 21, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - In a fresh reminder of the unresolved wartime grievances between China and Japan, authorities in Shanghai have seized a Japanese ship over claims dating back to the 1930s. Mitsui O.S.K. Lines said Monday that one of its iron ore carriers, the Baosteel Emotion, was impounded Saturday. Japan's top government spokesman, Yoshihide Suga, denounced the move, saying it could have a “chilling effect” on all Japanese companies doing business in China. “We are deeply apprehensive,” he added.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Former professional basketball star Bill Walton's back and leg pain was once so severe that he considered suicide. Nothing worked until he underwent spinal surgery with a procedure by NuVasive Inc. of San Diego. "I had lost everything. But now I'm back in the game of life. There is hope," said Walton, who has been a paid spokesperson for NuVasive, in company publicity materials. NuVasive is a medical device company that develops minimally disruptive surgical products and procedures for the spine.
OPINION
April 19, 2014
Re "A tax break worth saving," Editorial, April 16 There is no tax break worth saving. All the breaks do is make our tax code a laughingstock. Once we start protecting the "good" breaks, all of them will remain. Arthur Armstrong Manhattan Beach ALSO: Wrapping up the Bell scandal Teachers, seniority and students Tax havens prove alluring to China
WORLD
April 19, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - On the first Sunday of March, China awoke to sickening news: Black-clad attackers with knives had hacked through crowds at the train station in the southern city of Kunming, killing 29 and injuring more than 140. Reporters leaped into action, gathering details from victims in their hospital beds. President Xi Jinping urged all-out efforts to investigate the slaughter. The incident was quickly dubbed "China's 9/11. " But by nightfall Monday, the state-run New China News Agency signaled that it was time to move on. "Kunming railway station serious violent terror case is successfully solved," its headline said.
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