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OPINION
July 27, 2012 | By Rajan Menon
Just about everyone who's paying attention agrees that the prospects for a negotiated settlement in Syria are dismal, a consensus that's both depressing and an understatement. Depressing because the killing continues without letup. Between 10,000 and 17,000 people are estimated to have been killed so far, about 200,000 have fled to neighboring countries and more than 1 million are internal refugees. An understatement because the only real peace plan, that of Kofi Annan, the former United Nations secretary-general and now U.N. special envoy to Syria, is in tatters because of incompatible preconditions attached by Bashar Assad's Alawite-minority government and the armed opposition.
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OPINION
June 26, 2013
Re "Snowden hopscotches globe, staying just out of U.S. reach," June 24 Sounds like a kid's show: Where is Edward Snowden? At this point it doesn't really matter. Snowden has sensitive, classified information that he has probably been taking with him on a Cold War tour. His first haven, Hong Kong, is in China, and then there is Russia, with Cuba next on the list. Snowden could do real damage, as the U.S. is engaged in a technology war with its adversaries. Regardless of what the U.S. may or may not have done wrong, Snowden has set back the U.S. security apparatus.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999
Re Jiang Zemin's June 22 perspective on nuclear arms: It's not surprising to find China's President Jiang Zemin reluctant to reason that disarmament is [necessary] to restrain the ferocity of bully military powers like China and Iraq and to contain their capabilities to cause wanton mass destruction. Jiang's suggestion to strengthen the disarmament bodies of the United Nations is nothing but self-serving. The Kosovo experience has taught us that we need more organizations like NATO in the regions of the Pacific and Africa.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers sharply criticized China and Russia on Sunday for their apparent roles in Edward Snowden's flight from Hong Kong to Moscow. The United States had asked Hong Kong authorities to extradite Snowden so he could face criminal charges for his leaking of details of secret U.S. surveillance programs. But lawmakers on TV news programs on Sunday said China and Russia conspired to help Snowden flee. “What's infuriating here is Prime Minister Putin of Russia aiding and abetting Snowden's escape,” Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000
I don't know if being able to block a few missiles from North Korea is worth spending the ever-increasing billions they're asking. Maybe it is. And I don't know if it's worth driving real powers like China and Russia into an arms buildup and a panic attack, although Russia seems to be softening a little. Maybe it isn't. But I really don't know what kind of creature can take a system that fails almost all of a dozen tests that were rigged to begin with and tell us to push even harder for it. If we want some kind of missile defense, isn't it important to find something that can actually defend us?
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers sharply criticized China and Russia on Sunday for their apparent roles in Edward Snowden's flight from Hong Kong to Moscow. The United States had asked Hong Kong authorities to extradite Snowden so he could face criminal charges for his leaking of details of secret U.S. surveillance programs. But lawmakers on TV news programs on Sunday said China and Russia conspired to help Snowden flee. “What's infuriating here is Prime Minister Putin of Russia aiding and abetting Snowden's escape,” Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
WORLD
May 7, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye presented a united front in their warning to North Korea on Tuesday, saying they would not bend to confrontational behavior and welcomed international pressure on the North's young leader. The United States and South Korea “very much share the view that we are going to maintain a strong deterrent capability,” Obama said standing beside the new South Korean leader at a news conference. “But we remain open to the prospect of North Korea taking a peaceful path of denuclearization, abiding by international commitments, rejoining the international community.” The North Korean security threat was at the top of the agenda for Park's first trip to the White House since her election, a visit that comes amid heightened tension with North Korea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1999
Your Oct. 4 editorial ("Anti-U.S. Axis? Not Too Likely") appeared to underestimate the degree of frustration and alarm that countries like Russia, India and China feel when the U.S. imposes its writ at will at strategic spots around the world. You dismiss the likelihood that these nuclear powers would submerge their differences in order to provide a measure of bipolarity to this increasingly unipolar state of the international power structure. Established states such as these are likely to pursue their national interests, and if it requires putting aside "decades of suspicions, rivalries and occasional open hostility" in order to enter into alliances, even expedient ones, this possibility cannot be taken lightly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1998 | TOM BECKER
Who would guess that the world could fit inside an auditorium on Riverside Drive? That is exactly what the people from Charlotte and Elise Merdinian Armenian Evangelical School arranged Friday as part of the school's annual multicultural day. Inside, there was Mexico alongside Syria, Greece elbow to elbow with China and Russia sitting a few rows back from the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1985
President Reagan's proposed budget eliminates all funding for enforcement of the federal Animal Welfare Act! This outrageous proposal would with one blow destroy all progress made, with great effort by animal welfare organizations and humanitarians, over a quarter of a century for animals suffering and dying in experimental laboratories in the name of scientific research on behalf of human beings, and would take away the minimal protection the act...
WORLD
May 7, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye presented a united front in their warning to North Korea on Tuesday, saying they would not bend to confrontational behavior and welcomed international pressure on the North's young leader. The United States and South Korea “very much share the view that we are going to maintain a strong deterrent capability,” Obama said standing beside the new South Korean leader at a news conference. “But we remain open to the prospect of North Korea taking a peaceful path of denuclearization, abiding by international commitments, rejoining the international community.” The North Korean security threat was at the top of the agenda for Park's first trip to the White House since her election, a visit that comes amid heightened tension with North Korea.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2013 | By Janet I. Tu
When Microsoft Corp. announced recently that it was starting a big push to grow its market in Africa, it cited the continent's big growth opportunities, calling Africa a "game changer in the global economy. " Similarly, IBM Corp., Google Inc., Intel Corp., Hewlett-Packard Co. and other tech companies in recent years also have expanded their presence in Africa. As the growth of tech hardware, software or services flattens or declines in mature markets such as the U.S. and Western Europe, and markets in China, India and Russia grow increasingly competitive, many of the largest tech companies are looking to Africa.
OPINION
July 27, 2012 | By Rajan Menon
Just about everyone who's paying attention agrees that the prospects for a negotiated settlement in Syria are dismal, a consensus that's both depressing and an understatement. Depressing because the killing continues without letup. Between 10,000 and 17,000 people are estimated to have been killed so far, about 200,000 have fled to neighboring countries and more than 1 million are internal refugees. An understatement because the only real peace plan, that of Kofi Annan, the former United Nations secretary-general and now U.N. special envoy to Syria, is in tatters because of incompatible preconditions attached by Bashar Assad's Alawite-minority government and the armed opposition.
WORLD
October 16, 2009 | David Pierson
Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao said Thursday that his nation was committed to deepening its ties with Iran, a declaration that underscores the difficulty the United States will face in seeking broad economic sanctions against Tehran in an effort to rein in its nuclear program. "The Sino-Iranian relationship has witnessed rapid development, as the two countries' leaders have had frequent exchanges, and cooperation in trade and energy has widened and deepened," Wen said at a meeting in Beijing with visiting Iranian Vice President Mohammad Reza Rahimi, according to the official New China News Agency.
WORLD
July 14, 2009 | Paul Richter
American diplomatic efforts on North Korea are coming under fire within the Obama administration from officials who consider talks futile and instead want to focus on halting the regime's trade in nuclear weapons and missile equipment, U.S. officials said. The administration's official goal has been to coax the Pyongyang government back into the six-nation disarmament talks that began in 2003.
WORLD
October 11, 2006 | Peter Spiegel and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
The sanctions demanded by U.S. officials in response to North Korea's announcement this week that it had tested a nuclear device would focus on closing pathways to proliferation of weapons technology. But U.S. officials say any such effort would have to focus on the air and land routes through China and Russia that the government in Pyongyang has used in response to American monitoring on the high seas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989
Rep. Henry Hyde (R-Ill.) in his Op-Ed piece, ("And So We Capitulate," Aug. 11) laments the disarming of the Contras, and the approval of that action by the Central American presidents. He sees it as both a debacle and a consequence of the failure of the liberal Democrats in Congress to support the Contras. He conveniently overlooks the real reasons for their action. The Central American countries have rarely been in favor of North American intervention in their internal affairs. In addition, the majority of Nicaraguans were never supportive of the Contras, as evidenced by their inability to control any strategic area of the country for any length of time in spite of very powerful logistical support.
OPINION
June 26, 2013
Re "Snowden hopscotches globe, staying just out of U.S. reach," June 24 Sounds like a kid's show: Where is Edward Snowden? At this point it doesn't really matter. Snowden has sensitive, classified information that he has probably been taking with him on a Cold War tour. His first haven, Hong Kong, is in China, and then there is Russia, with Cuba next on the list. Snowden could do real damage, as the U.S. is engaged in a technology war with its adversaries. Regardless of what the U.S. may or may not have done wrong, Snowden has set back the U.S. security apparatus.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2006 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
The global economy is on a growth streak that is shaping up to be the broadest and strongest expansion in more than three decades. Rising spending and investment by consumers and businesses worldwide are boosting national economies on every continent, pushing down unemployment rates in many countries and lifting business earnings and confidence. Of 60 nations tracked by investment firm Bridgewater Associates, not one is in recession -- the first time that has been true since 1969.
WORLD
August 17, 2005 | Mark Magnier and Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writers
As they prepare to join forces for their largest military exercise in modern history, China and Russia have billed this week's maneuvers as a cooperative fight against terrorism. But they're also sending a message to Washington, analysts say: Don't push the two former Cold War adversaries too far. The eight-day exercise, which will begin Thursday, will be the most extensive since Beijing and Moscow fought together against U.S.-led forces during the Korean War half a century ago.
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