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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The white gloves are off in the rarefied world of classical music in China, where a nasty feud between two of the country's top orchestras has the art scene here abuzz. Mass defections by musicians, vitriolic published attacks, shadowy political intrigue--all are elements that have combined to make for a backstage drama full of as much sturm und drang as a Mahler symphony.
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NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
Art gallery or hotel? Mandarin Oriental has just opened its eighth property in China, this one in Shanghai, and the hotel houses 4,000 original artworks. The art collection at Mandarin Oriental Pudong, Shanghai , can be seen throughout the hotel, where it hangs in public spaces and guestrooms. The debut last week drew well-known Chinese artists as well as faculty from the Fine Arts College at Shanghai University, who praised the hotel. “It provides a stunning backdrop to showcase some of China's most exciting artworks,” said Li Xiao Feng of Shanghai University.  The 362-room hotel, on the east bank of the Huangpu River in the Lujiazui financial district, has six restaurants and bars, a spa, indoor pool and fitness center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Staff Writer
Despite the cancellation of the Joffrey Ballet, the Second China Arts Festival in Beijing will still take place, an official of the People's Republic of China said Thursday. Up until Wednesday, the Joffrey troupe, expected to comprise 40 dancers (plus 56 arts patrons traveling with the company), was scheduled to appear in the festival Sept. 16-20. Penelope Curry, executive director of the company, announced that the Joffrey's participation had been canceled. Reached in New York on Thursday, Curry said that she decided to cancel the trip because of the recent unrest in China.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
LET OTHERS talk about the lure of art from China. James Elaine did something about it. He moved there. "China is here to stay," says Elaine, an artist and curator who has organized edgy exhibitions and introduced emerging figures at the UCLA Hammer Museum for the last decade. "The culture, the art world, it's not a fad of the West that's going to fade away. China is a power."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1989 | SHARON DIRLAM, Dirlam is a free-lance writer based in Beijing
All of the American and Western European groups that once planned to perform at the second China Arts Festival, Sept. 15-Oct. 15, have canceled, sources confirmed on Monday. The Joffrey Ballet of Los Angeles and New York had been at the top of the list of international performers invited to China for the festival, but was among the first to cancel after the army put a violent end to student demonstrations in Beijing on June 4.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1989 | SHARON DIRLAM, Dirlam is a free-lance writer based in Beijing. and
The city is eerily quiet these hot summer evenings. With martial law still in effect, young soldiers stand at attention, guns in hand, throughout the city. On the few occasions they speak, it is to tell someone to move along. Television runs hours and hours of Communist Party meetings--rows of men in blue Mao suits, sitting with their lidded cups of tea, making long speeches in praise of their leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
The gulf between the sophisticated nuances of Chinese "literati" painting and the stuff that decorates plastic place mats at your favorite moo shu pork eatery is not as great as you may think. These days, Chinese artists in Taiwan and the United States--and, increasingly, painters working in the People's Republic--are melding traditional styles with odd remnants of Western art.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
Art gallery or hotel? Mandarin Oriental has just opened its eighth property in China, this one in Shanghai, and the hotel houses 4,000 original artworks. The art collection at Mandarin Oriental Pudong, Shanghai , can be seen throughout the hotel, where it hangs in public spaces and guestrooms. The debut last week drew well-known Chinese artists as well as faculty from the Fine Arts College at Shanghai University, who praised the hotel. “It provides a stunning backdrop to showcase some of China's most exciting artworks,” said Li Xiao Feng of Shanghai University.  The 362-room hotel, on the east bank of the Huangpu River in the Lujiazui financial district, has six restaurants and bars, a spa, indoor pool and fitness center.
NEWS
December 8, 1985 | ANTHONY BARKER, Reuters
China's anti-crime drive has reached beyond the moat of Peking's ancient Forbidden City with the installation of sophisticated security devices to protect the treasures of the country's rich Imperial past. Since the Communist takeover in 1949, three burglars, one a Kung Fu expert, have managed to grab items from the vast former home of Chinese emperors, now a museum housing 200,000 precious relics from pre-revolutionary days.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
A Tokyo art dealer paid $5.9 million today for an 8th-Century porcelain horse, a record price for Chinese art, Sotheby's auctioneers said. The price for the Tang Dynasty horse, stolen and chipped by thieves last month, was three times higher than Sotheby's estimate and twice the previous record for Chinese art, an auction house spokesman said. The buyer was identified only as Mr. Shimojo of Shimojo's art dealers in Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The white gloves are off in the rarefied world of classical music in China, where a nasty feud between two of the country's top orchestras has the art scene here abuzz. Mass defections by musicians, vitriolic published attacks, shadowy political intrigue--all are elements that have combined to make for a backstage drama full of as much sturm und drang as a Mahler symphony.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China's most influential advocate of a more relaxed approach to ideology and culture has lashed out at hard-line leftists and promised a loosening of controls, official newspapers reported Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
A Tokyo art dealer paid $5.9 million today for an 8th-Century porcelain horse, a record price for Chinese art, Sotheby's auctioneers said. The price for the Tang Dynasty horse, stolen and chipped by thieves last month, was three times higher than Sotheby's estimate and twice the previous record for Chinese art, an auction house spokesman said. The buyer was identified only as Mr. Shimojo of Shimojo's art dealers in Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1989 | SHARON DIRLAM, Dirlam is a free-lance writer based in Beijing
All of the American and Western European groups that once planned to perform at the second China Arts Festival, Sept. 15-Oct. 15, have canceled, sources confirmed on Monday. The Joffrey Ballet of Los Angeles and New York had been at the top of the list of international performers invited to China for the festival, but was among the first to cancel after the army put a violent end to student demonstrations in Beijing on June 4.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1989 | SHARON DIRLAM, Dirlam is a free-lance writer based in Beijing. and
The city is eerily quiet these hot summer evenings. With martial law still in effect, young soldiers stand at attention, guns in hand, throughout the city. On the few occasions they speak, it is to tell someone to move along. Television runs hours and hours of Communist Party meetings--rows of men in blue Mao suits, sitting with their lidded cups of tea, making long speeches in praise of their leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Staff Writer
Despite the cancellation of the Joffrey Ballet, the Second China Arts Festival in Beijing will still take place, an official of the People's Republic of China said Thursday. Up until Wednesday, the Joffrey troupe, expected to comprise 40 dancers (plus 56 arts patrons traveling with the company), was scheduled to appear in the festival Sept. 16-20. Penelope Curry, executive director of the company, announced that the Joffrey's participation had been canceled. Reached in New York on Thursday, Curry said that she decided to cancel the trip because of the recent unrest in China.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
At the start of the Memorial Day weekend, baritone John Raitt sang several bars of "Oh What a Beautiful Morning" from "Oklahoma!" to a delegation of visiting Chinese cultural officials. On this Saturday morning in Pasadena, against a backdrop of white outdoor furniture and lush green lawn, a beautiful morning is all it seemed to be--on the surface. Lu Zhengwu, foreign affairs chief for the Bureau of Arts Education in Beijing, who is responsible for international cultural exchanges and speaks English, said he was "most pleased to meet our American friends in the sunshine, and on such a wonderful day."
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China's most influential advocate of a more relaxed approach to ideology and culture has lashed out at hard-line leftists and promised a loosening of controls, official newspapers reported Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
At the start of the Memorial Day weekend, baritone John Raitt sang several bars of "Oh What a Beautiful Morning" from "Oklahoma!" to a delegation of visiting Chinese cultural officials. On this Saturday morning in Pasadena, against a backdrop of white outdoor furniture and lush green lawn, a beautiful morning is all it seemed to be--on the surface. Lu Zhengwu, foreign affairs chief for the Bureau of Arts Education in Beijing, who is responsible for international cultural exchanges and speaks English, said he was "most pleased to meet our American friends in the sunshine, and on such a wonderful day."
BOOKS
August 21, 1988 | Ralph C. Croizier, Croizier is the author of "Art and Revolution in Modern China," published earlier this year by UC Press.
Nudity, abstraction, religious imagery, decorative style--these are not the elements usually associated with painting in the People's Republic of China. This reproduction volume on one of China's new regional painting schools shows how much Chinese art, and our access to it, has changed in the 1980s.
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