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China Defense

NEWS
June 15, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the wave of the future in Asia a Chinese military colossus? A Japan so overwhelmed by its populous neighbor that it would be a tool in China's hands? These are questions that Asians are beginning to ponder as China moves toward a new status as an economic superpower. And the possible answers pose dramatically opposing alternatives for Asia's future. A China concentrating on economic development would continue to provide, as it already has, a significant spur to Asian growth.
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NEWS
February 21, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A port call by a U.S. missile cruiser to the Chinese naval base in Qingdao last year provided a stunning contrast between the two military powers' equipment and attitudes. As soon as the Aegis-class cruiser Bunker Hill docked, Chinese photographers and television camera operators, some with dubious journalistic credentials, were ushered aboard and allowed to photograph one of America's most state-of-the-art warships from stem to stern. But U.S.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the last two months, the Pentagon has moved quietly but rapidly to develop military ties with the Chinese People's Liberation Army, raising questions in the United States and among Asian governments about what the new relationship means and where it is headed. Two months ago, in a private ceremony, a top Chinese general received the same sort of honor cordon at the Pentagon that Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide recently received on nationwide television. Last month, Gen. Merrill A.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
China's defense minister defended his actions in cracking down on student pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square and took a hard line Tuesday on Chinese relations with Taiwan. Bluntly addressing two of the most sensitive issues surrounding U.S.-Chinese relations--and his visit to the United States--Defense Minister Chi Haotian told an audience of U.S.
OPINION
June 8, 2005
Re Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's warning about the growing Chinese military budget, June 4: I felt that it could be used to define our own explanation for our own military actions. Rumsfeld's comment that "since no nation threatens China, one must wonder why this growing investment." The hypocrisy inherent in this statement can be mirrored in our own use of Iraq as an excuse to exert our own military might. China has as much to fear from Taiwan as we had to fear from Iraq. The bottom line is that powerful nations do as they wish for their own gains and use any convenient excuse to justify their decisions.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soldiers loyal to China's president detained the defense minister and several commanders in a dispute over a top military post vacated by Zhao Ziyang, the purged Communist Party boss, Chinese sources said today. They said President Yang Shangkun, a central figure in the martial law crackdown, apparently ordered the action to strengthen his control of the Chinese military.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two outstanding questions loomed at the opening of the U.N. Fourth World Conference on Women that concludes here today: The first was whether the international women's movement could maintain the consensus on reproductive health and a woman's sovereignty over her own body that was achieved last year at the Cairo International Conference on Population and Development.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Defense spending will increase nearly 13% this year, despite a serious budget deficit, so that the army can modernize its arsenal, China's finance minister said. It is the second year in a row that China has sharply increased military spending. The draft 1991 budget presented by Finance Minister Wang Bingqian to the annual session of the National People's Congress included an overall 5% increase in government spending, with a projected deficit of $2.5 billion.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | From Reuters
China's Defense Minister Qin Jiwei, who was reported in the West to have been under detention, was shown on state television Saturday attending a funeral service for a veteran revolutionary. Qin was among senior leaders, including Communist Party chief Jiang Zemin and hard-line Premier Li Peng, who attended the funeral in Beijing for Gen. Fu Zhong.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With President Bush attacking the Democratic-controlled Congress even before it convenes today for its 1990 session, confrontation appears certain to overwhelm cooperation between Capitol Hill and the White House in this election year. Democratic and Republican leaders expect major battles over the level of defense spending, rival tax cut proposals, campaign finance reform and China policy.
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