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China Human Rights

NEWS
May 14, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has launched a secret, intensive diplomatic campaign to get China to make more concessions on human rights in the final weeks before the U.S. deadline for deciding whether Beijing's trade privileges in this country should be renewed, officials say.
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OPINION
November 2, 1997 | YING MA, Ying Ma is a member of the Leap August Society, a group of Chinese-born American residents. She is a research associate of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York
I am part of a group of Chinese immigrants who left our native land with minds still young and open to the world. We left with great pride in our civilization, with painful understanding of China's humiliations and failures in the 20th century, but without the intense bitterness toward the Chinese government held by many political dissidents. Living in the U.S., we have recognized, albeit reluctantly, China's economic backwardness and political oppression.
WORLD
October 8, 2010 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Governments and human rights activists in Europe praised the Norwegian Nobel Committee's decision to award its prestigious peace price to Chinese dissident Liu Xiabao on Friday, their voices reflecting a deepening concern on the continent about Beijing's domestic political repression. Many European governments had muted their criticism of China's human rights record over the last decade as they chased growing trade and business opportunities in the emerging economic giant. But an underlying current of unease has been stirring in the last two years, prompted by negative impressions of China's crackdown on ethnic dissent before the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics and what was seen as its obstructionist tactics that helped scuttle last year's climate change negotiations.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday sharply protested a sudden crackdown on dissidents by China, just one week before a planned trip to Beijing by Secretary of State Warren Christopher. "We strongly disapprove what was done, and it obviously was not helpful to our relations," said Clinton, whose Administration must decide by June whether to continue preferential trade status for China. Some Administration officials hinted that the crackdown might even prompt the cancellation of Christopher's visit.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Friday that there has been some progress on human rights in China as a result of the secret trips to Beijing by Brent Scowcroft, his national security adviser. "The Voice of America, for example . . . you know, they have a person permitted to go there (to China)," Bush said at a news conference. Moreover, he said, China has repeated pledges not to sell missiles in the Middle East, "which I think is in the interest of peace in the world."
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hollow victory for Beijing, the U.N. Human Rights Commission on Wednesday narrowly rejected a resolution condemning China's "continuing violation of human rights and fundamental freedoms." The resolution, sponsored by the European Union and supported by the United States, was an important--though largely symbolic--attempt by Western nations to again focus world attention on China's human rights record.
WORLD
November 16, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
President Obama told Chinese students today that the U.S. does not wish to contain China's rise, but also offered a gentle critique of their country's approach to human rights. "We welcome China as a strong and prosperous and successful member of the community of nations," Obama said at the start of a town hall-style meeting in Shanghai as he began the China leg of his tour of Asia. Obama acknowledged that the United States has struggled with race relations over the course of its history, but he said America would "always speak out" in favor of free expression, worship, political participation and access to information -- which he termed "universal rights."
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a tense atmosphere that reflected the shaky state of U.S.-Chinese relations, a somber Secretary of State Warren Christopher landed in Beijing on Friday night on a mission to try to change human rights policies in the world's most populous country. It was clear immediately upon Christopher's arrival that neither the Chinese government nor the United States was in any mood for politeness, smiles or routine diplomatic formalities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993 | TOM LANTOS, Tom Lantos (D-San Mateo) is a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee
In September, the International Olympic Committee will select the site for the Olympic Games in the year 2000. Many countries, including Australia, Brazil, Germany, Turkey and England, are vying for the honor of hosting these games. One option, however, is an easy one to reject. China is absolutely the wrong place for the games. Beijing should not host the 2000 Olympics. The Chinese have aggressively lobbied for the honor of hosting the games.
NEWS
October 6, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
China signed an important international agreement on civil and political rights Monday that guarantees protection against arbitrary arrest while securing freedom of thought, religion and expression. The treaty provides for fair trials; prohibits torture and cruel or degrading punishment; and recognizes that citizens have the right to life, liberty and a prompt appearance before a judge if detained by authorities.
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