Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChina Immigration
IN THE NEWS

China Immigration

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 10, 1989
China for the first time has refused to accept Chinese illegal immigrants being returned from Hong Kong, a Hong Kong government spokesman said. A total of 70 were scheduled to be repatriated to the neighboring Chinese province of Guandong, but Chinese officials refused to accept them at the border. The Hong Kong spokesman said that talks are being conducted on the incident. Under a 1982 accord, China has routinely accepted illegal immigrants returned by Hong Kong.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jimmy Li was an ordinary Taiwanese cop. He never expected to find a new career in mainland China, much less settle down there with his wife, two kids and his mother-in-law. But a nine-room apartment, a live-in maid, a chauffeur, great food, sports and shopping in a culturally familiar setting at a fraction of the cost at home made the decision a no-brainer. Forget about missile shields and submarines. Forget that the governments in Beijing and Taipei are among the world's most implacable foes.
Advertisement
SPORTS
December 25, 1990
The head coach of China's tennis table team has received permission to settle in France, an official Chinese newspaper said. However, the State Sports Commission denied Xu Shaofa had moved permanently to France and said he had not quit or been fired.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | From Associated Press
Migrants from mainland China set Hong Kong's immigration headquarters on fire Wednesday in an effort to avoid being sent home, authorities said. About 47 people were injured, including several with severe burns. Ambrose Lee, the territory's director of immigration, said about 20 migrants were asked to leave a 13th-floor area where they had gone seeking documents. Instead, they poured flammable liquid on the floor and set the area ablaze. There were no immediate reports of fatalities.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jimmy Li was an ordinary Taiwanese cop. He never expected to find a new career in mainland China, much less settle down there with his wife, two kids and his mother-in-law. But a nine-room apartment, a live-in maid, a chauffeur, great food, sports and shopping in a culturally familiar setting at a fraction of the cost at home made the decision a no-brainer. Forget about missile shields and submarines. Forget that the governments in Beijing and Taipei are among the world's most implacable foes.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Fang Lizhi, China's most prominent dissident, said Tuesday that he will continue to work for progress in his homeland as he returns to an academic life in Britain. Fang and his wife, Li Shuxian, arrived in London after Chinese authorities Monday allowed them to leave their yearlong refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
He is an energetic man of 66, with silky white hair, mischievous eyes and a voice that erupts in a laugh so intense one is sure its force is meant to subdue some rising pain. He is replaying the years since he fled Iran in 1980--escaping a firing squad for the third time. "What I am really missing is my 12,000 volumes of books, which I left in Tehran," says Dr.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While millions of people in China may want to live in prospering Hong Kong, Lam Mei-cheng, a housewife from nearby Guangdong province, had three compelling reasons to sneak across the border: Her husband and two of her children are here. But under the strict immigration laws of Hong Kong and China, Lam had been separated from her husband for more than half of their 11-year marriage. They have a total of four children but had been apart even during the births of some of them.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | From Associated Press
Migrants from mainland China set Hong Kong's immigration headquarters on fire Wednesday in an effort to avoid being sent home, authorities said. About 47 people were injured, including several with severe burns. Ambrose Lee, the territory's director of immigration, said about 20 migrants were asked to leave a 13th-floor area where they had gone seeking documents. Instead, they poured flammable liquid on the floor and set the area ablaze. There were no immediate reports of fatalities.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
China's top immigration official has been detained for questioning in a $10-billion smuggling scandal, government sources said. Xu Ganlu, 37, is a protege of Li Jizhou, the vice minister of public security who, sources say, was detained last year on corruption charges linked to the scandal. Meanwhile, Lin Youfang, the wife of Beijing's Communist Party boss, Jia Qinglin, denied involvement in the scandal.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While millions of people in China may want to live in prospering Hong Kong, Lam Mei-cheng, a housewife from nearby Guangdong province, had three compelling reasons to sneak across the border: Her husband and two of her children are here. But under the strict immigration laws of Hong Kong and China, Lam had been separated from her husband for more than half of their 11-year marriage. They have a total of four children but had been apart even during the births of some of them.
SPORTS
December 25, 1990
The head coach of China's tennis table team has received permission to settle in France, an official Chinese newspaper said. However, the State Sports Commission denied Xu Shaofa had moved permanently to France and said he had not quit or been fired.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Fang Lizhi, China's most prominent dissident, said Tuesday that he will continue to work for progress in his homeland as he returns to an academic life in Britain. Fang and his wife, Li Shuxian, arrived in London after Chinese authorities Monday allowed them to leave their yearlong refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.
NEWS
October 10, 1989
China for the first time has refused to accept Chinese illegal immigrants being returned from Hong Kong, a Hong Kong government spokesman said. A total of 70 were scheduled to be repatriated to the neighboring Chinese province of Guandong, but Chinese officials refused to accept them at the border. The Hong Kong spokesman said that talks are being conducted on the incident. Under a 1982 accord, China has routinely accepted illegal immigrants returned by Hong Kong.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
He is an energetic man of 66, with silky white hair, mischievous eyes and a voice that erupts in a laugh so intense one is sure its force is meant to subdue some rising pain. He is replaying the years since he fled Iran in 1980--escaping a firing squad for the third time. "What I am really missing is my 12,000 volumes of books, which I left in Tehran," says Dr.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|