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China Ocean Shipping Co

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1997
A House committee early Thursday approved legislation that would forbid Long Beach harbor officials from leasing a planned shipping terminal on the site of a closed naval station to their most promising customer, a Chinese shipping line. An amendment to the annual defense authorization bill would bar cities from selling or leasing former military property to any foreign-controlled shipping company. The committee approved the bill by a 51-3 vote.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Congress has killed a deal to lease the abandoned Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping company, the Port of Long Beach vowed Friday to find new tenants for the controversial base and to make other accommodations to keep the China Ocean Shipping Co. from leaving the harbor. John W.
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NEWS
April 13, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Long Beach's plan to raze its closed Naval Station and build a $200-million cargo terminal suffered another legal setback last week when a judge ruled that the city's port commission must consider the project a third time. Acting on a request by preservationists, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien ordered the commission to consider the project "free and clear" of any predisposition and report back to him by mid-May.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Long Beach is about to lose the chance to lease a terminal through its port to a major shipper, China Ocean Shipping Co., or Cosco, because a congressman from San Diego created a piece of legislation that prevents Long Beach from doing so. That's a loss to Long Beach because the community could have benefited to the tune of $20 million a year. Cosco would have leased a whole terminal on the site of the former U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1997
Long Beach's plan to raze its closed Naval Station and build a $200-million cargo terminal suffered another legal setback Friday when a judge ruled that the city's port commission must consider the project a third time. Acting on a request by preservationists, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien ordered the commission to consider the project "free and clear" of any predisposition and report back to him by mid-May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1997
Two Republican congressmen came to the aid of the embattled Port of Long Beach on Tuesday, saying the CIA and other federal agencies have assured them that China's state-owned shipping line would pose no danger if its operations are allowed to expand. China Ocean Shipping Co. (Cosco), a customer at the port since 1981, is expected to occupy a planned $200-million cargo terminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1997
Following a judge's order, the Long Beach Harbor Commission on Monday took a first step toward canceling its controversial lease with a Chinese state-run shipping line, city officials said. The panel voted unanimously to ask Port of Long Beach staff to develop documents canceling the lease with the China Ocean Shipping Co., or Cosco. In the lease, signed in October, the port agreed to build a 145-acre terminal for the company on the site of the city's closed Naval Station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial plan to lease land at the former Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping line may be back on the table after an appeals court decided that the Port of Long Beach followed state law in its environmental review process. As a result, if the Navy turns over 300 acres of the closed Navy base to the port, harbor officials can again approach China Ocean Shipping Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of a proposal to turn shuttered Long Beach Naval Station property into a 145-acre cargo terminal for a Chinese shipping line struck a major blow Wednesday on Capitol Hill as a key committee approved a provision to outlaw the project. An amendment added to a routine defense bill by a 29-24 vote of the House National Security Committee would bar cities from selling or leasing any former military installation to any foreign-owned shipping line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Diego congressman on Thursday introduced legislation to block any effort by the Port of Long Beach to lease property to one of its fastest-growing tenants, a Chinese state-owned steamship line. Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-El Cajon) said he hopes to torpedo the city's plan to bulldoze its shuttered naval station, build a 145-acre cargo terminal on the land and lease it to the China Ocean Shipping Co., or Cosco. The company has been a tenant at the port since 1981.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1998 | ROBERT A. JONES
If you read past the Monica news last week, you may have noticed an odd little item about a shipping firm known as the China Ocean Shipping Co., or Cosco for short. Cosco is not your everyday shipping firm. It's owned and operated by the Chinese government. And it seems that some diehard commie haters in Congress have decided to prevent the company from leasing federally owned land in the United States. We don't normally get into international relations on this page, but bear with me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driven by fears of a rising Chinese military threat, congressional conferees have agreed to kill an industrial development project aimed at bringing hundreds of new jobs and millions of dollars in revenues to the Port of Long Beach, port officials say. Lawmakers have agreed to include language in the annual defense authorization bill that would bar Cosco, the China Ocean Shipping Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial plan to lease land at the former Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping line may be back on the table after an appeals court decided that the Port of Long Beach followed state law in its environmental review process. As a result, if the Navy turns over 300 acres of the closed Navy base to the port, harbor officials can again approach China Ocean Shipping Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Feeling his way through the nuances of Sino-American diplomacy, Mayor Richard Riordan scored subtle political victories Monday, but failed to win a major Chinese shipping line's firm commitment to make Los Angeles rather than Long Beach its West Coast port of entry. Executives of the firm, Cosco, did not reject Riordan's overtures, and expressed continued interest in the port.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1997
A House committee early Thursday approved legislation that would forbid Long Beach harbor officials from leasing a planned shipping terminal on the site of a closed naval station to their most promising customer, a Chinese shipping line. An amendment to the annual defense authorization bill would bar cities from selling or leasing former military property to any foreign-controlled shipping company. The committee approved the bill by a 51-3 vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of a proposal to turn shuttered Long Beach Naval Station property into a 145-acre cargo terminal for a Chinese shipping line struck a major blow Wednesday on Capitol Hill as a key committee approved a provision to outlaw the project. An amendment added to a routine defense bill by a 29-24 vote of the House National Security Committee would bar cities from selling or leasing any former military installation to any foreign-owned shipping line.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Long Beach is about to lose the chance to lease a terminal through its port to a major shipper, China Ocean Shipping Co., or Cosco, because a congressman from San Diego created a piece of legislation that prevents Long Beach from doing so. That's a loss to Long Beach because the community could have benefited to the tune of $20 million a year. Cosco would have leased a whole terminal on the site of the former U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Congress has killed a deal to lease the abandoned Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping company, the Port of Long Beach vowed Friday to find new tenants for the controversial base and to make other accommodations to keep the China Ocean Shipping Co. from leaving the harbor. John W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge's ruling issued Tuesday may block the Port of Long Beach's plan to build and lease a vast new terminal to perhaps its most promising--and most controversial--customer, a Chinese government-owned shipping line. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien appeared to sink construction of the cargo terminal for China Ocean Shipping Co., known as Cosco, ruling that the city's port was predisposed to approve the project before studying its potential impact on the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Long Beach Harbor Commission voted to cancel its lease with a Chinese state-run shipping company Monday, even as two commissioners were calling on officials of the company in Beijing. The vote was made necessary by a string of courtroom setbacks, and it throws plans for a new cargo terminal on the site of the city's former Naval Station into a state of uncertainty.
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