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China Ocean Shipping

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1997
In a major legal victory for Long Beach preservationists, a judge ruled late Thursday that the Port of Long Beach must reevaluate its plans to raze a historic naval base and erect a cargo terminal on the site. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien ruled that port officials had run afoul of environmental law by agreeing to lease the property to China Ocean Shipping Co., one of the port's fastest-growing tenants, before it studied the environmental impact of the terminal project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998
Many thanks to Robert A. Jones for "History's Last Chance in Long Beach" (Sept. 13), on the proposed disposition of the former Navy base in Long Beach. He made a comparison to what was done in San Francisco when the Presidio of the U.S. Army was deemed surplus and vacated. Constructive actions were taken to preserve the historic site. Long Beach Mayor Beverly O'Neill and the Long Beach Harbor Commission have been obsessed with having the Navy property's structures demolished and the land asphalted over and made into a shipping terminal that they in turn would lease to the Chinese-government-owned China Ocean Shipping Co. Thank God Congress has recently killed the development project, citing the potential threat from China's military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixteen Chinese men and teenage boys were discovered Saturday morning in a cargo container at the Port of Long Beach, immigration authorities said. The men were in "relatively good condition," said Tom Graber, area port director for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. The INS arrested all 16 stowaways, two of whom said they were minors. They are being held at the INS processing center on Terminal Island. The stowaways were found before 11 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1997
Following a judge's order, the Long Beach Harbor Commission on Monday took a first step toward canceling its controversial lease with a Chinese state-run shipping line, city officials said. The panel voted unanimously to ask Port of Long Beach staff to develop documents canceling the lease with the China Ocean Shipping Co., or Cosco. In the lease, signed in October, the port agreed to build a 145-acre terminal for the company on the site of the city's closed Naval Station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1996
The California Coastal Commission signaled this week that it may not allow the Port of Long Beach to bury tons of contaminated silt in an offshore disposal area, delivering a potentially huge blow to the port's plan to build a cargo terminal for its fastest-growing tenant. The panel, at its meeting Wednesday in San Francisco, put off what was expected to be a routine decision on the port's application for a construction permit, and is expected to take up the issue at its next monthly meeting.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Port of Long Beach on Wednesday said it signed an agreement with a major South Korean shipping line to operate a 375-acre cargo terminal on the site of the former Long Beach Naval Station. That site was the focus of a bitter fight two years ago when the port tried to lease the historic base to a firm owned by the Chinese government. If completed, the deal with the Hanjin Shipping Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Congress has killed a deal to lease the abandoned Long Beach Naval Station to a Chinese shipping company, the Port of Long Beach vowed Friday to find new tenants for the controversial base and to make other accommodations to keep the China Ocean Shipping Co. from leaving the harbor. John W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a widespread public outcry over plans to demolish recreational facilities at the Long Beach Naval Station to make room for a cargo container yard, city officials agreed Wednesday to pay $2 million to start building a 13-acre park nearby. "Because we are taking potentially usable recreational facilities away from our community, we are willing to mitigate their loss by replacing them with similar facilities elsewhere in the city," said Harbor Commission President George Murchison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000 | ROBERT L. MAGINNIS, Retired Army Lt. Col. Robert L. Maginnis is the Family Research Council's vice president for national security and foreign affairs
Supporters of permanent normal trade relations with China believe that trade will transform that nation into a democratic, capitalist republic. Opponents contend favorable trade will help China become a dangerous adversary. Our government's premier concern must be national security. That's why the pending normal relations decision must be based on our best guess as to how improved trade relations will influence China's future military course.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. border agents have seized two truckloads of military assault rifles and grenade launchers that were mysteriously smuggled into this country through the Port of Long Beach and were addressed to Mexico City, officials said. The Mexican consulate said diplomats have been told the ship with the contraband arms came from Asia. But U.S. officials declined to reveal the origin of the shipments, which contained thousands of parts of disassembled weapons, or what ship brought them to Long Beach.
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