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NEWS
February 2, 1999 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to solidify China's economic reforms, the legislature is preparing to amend the constitution to protect private enterprise and strengthen the rule of law. The amendments, to be ratified by the National People's Congress next month, also will enshrine the economic ideas of Deng Xiaoping alongside the ideologies of Marx, Lenin and Mao.
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NEWS
February 27, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political and religious persecution in China is getting steadily worse despite progress toward a market-based economy, the State Department reported Monday, dimming hopes that economic engagement would lead to improved human rights. "The [Chinese] government's poor human rights record worsened, and it continued to commit numerous serious abuses," the department said in its annual report on human rights conditions in 195 countries and territories. The report, compiled by U.S.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few of Chinese Premier Zhu Rongji's speeches have touched off as much speculation as the one he gave last month at his alma mater, Qinghua University. His address was hardly over before tongues started to wag. Not about his frank remarks on Sino-U.S. relations or his assessment of China's economic woes, but about his seemingly innocuous announcement that he would resign as nominal dean of Qinghua's management school. Interpretations of Zhu's announcement splayed all over the map.
NEWS
March 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
China has granted early release to a leader of the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests who was rearrested and sentenced in 1996 to five years' imprisonment on hooliganism charges, a human rights group said. Guo Haifeng was released Feb. 5, several months early, from prison in central Henan province, the Hong Kong-based Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said. It speculated that the release may have been designed to boost Beijing's bid for the 2008 Olympic Games.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
China has freed a schoolteacher and reduced the prison term of an accomplice jailed for splattering paint on Mao Tse-tung's portrait in Tiananmen Square during democracy protests 11 1/2 years ago, a human rights campaigner said Saturday. By defacing Mao's mammoth portrait, Yu Zhijian and Yu Dongyue symbolized popular anger at China's revolutionary old guard during the heady 1989 protests.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | From Reuters
China has freed and expelled a U.S.-based Chinese dissident who sneaked into the country to try to set up an opposition party, ridding itself abruptly of an international human rights embarrassment. Wang Bingzhang, 50, was released from detention and put aboard a flight to Los Angeles from Shanghai on Monday. He had been seized in Anhui province Friday. "I wasn't surprised by my release," he said by telephone from Los Angeles, where he was resting at the home of a friend.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Two dissidents arrested this week are suspected of endangering national security, China's government said in the clearest sign yet that it intends to block their campaign to form an opposition party. Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhu Bangzao refused to say how Xu Wenli and Qin Yongmin endangered the state or to specify what laws they broke. Wang Youcai, a third activist in the campaign to set up the China Democracy Party, has been in custody for a month.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its latest series of rules regulating Internet use, the Chinese government has sent another strong signal of its desire to control the burgeoning world of cyberspace--and its relative inability to do so.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | Washington Post
A Justice Department investigation into improper political fund-raising activities has uncovered evidence that representatives of China sought to direct contributions from foreign sources to the Democratic National Committee before the 1996 presidential campaign, officials familiar with the inquiry told the Washington Post. Sensitive intelligence information shows that the Chinese Embassy in Washington was used for planning contributions to the DNC, the sources said.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government, attempting to quell rampant rumors about the failing health of senior leader Deng Xiaoping that sent stock markets reeling, declared Tuesday that there was "no great change" in the 92-year-old's condition. "There has been no great change in Comrade Deng Xiaoping's health situation," Foreign Ministry spokesman Tang Guoqiang said. "I have no new information to provide."
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