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October 2, 2010 | Times staff reports
Actor Joe Mantell, who was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in the 1955 film "Marty" and delivered one of film's most famous lines in "Chinatown," has died. He was 94. Mantell died of pneumonia Wednesday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, said his daughter Cathy. Mantell received an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor in 1956 for his performance as Angie, the best friend of Ernest Borgnine in "Marty. " His oft-repeated question to his sad-sack friend ?
August 22, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Alarmed by plans for aWal-Martgrocery store in Chinatown, a city planning committee Tuesday approved a temporary ban on large retail chain stores setting up shop in the downtown district. In a 2-1 vote, members of the Los Angeles Planning and Land Use Management panel found that if the city doesn't act, an infusion of big-box stores could endanger the unique cultural character of Chinatown. The viability of the historic neighborhood is at risk, said committee Chairman Ed Reyes. Reyes and fellow committee member Jose Huizar instructed the city's Planning Department to prepare an ordinance that would temporarily ban chain stores larger than 20,000 square feet from gaining permits.
October 5, 2011
Uan Rasey Trumpet player in 'Chinatown' and other films Uan Rasey, 90, a first-call trumpet player for MGM and other studio orchestras best known for his evocative solo in Roman Polanski's 1974 film "Chinatown," died Sept. 26 at Kaiser Permanente Woodland Hills Medical Center, said his grandson Tristan Verstraeten. The Studio City resident hadheart problems. Besides soloing in composerJerry Goldsmith's Oscar-nominated score for "Chinatown," Rasey played trumpet for many other film soundtracks, including "An American in Paris," "Ben-Hur," "Bye Bye Birdie," "Cleopatra," "Gigi," "How the West Was Won," "My Fair Lady," "Singin' in the Rain," "Spartacus" and "West Side Story.
September 29, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
It wasn't long ago that Liz Lopez watched in dismay as the Vannord Shopping Center in her Panorama City neighborhood went downhill, losing its anchor, Valley Foods Warehouse, among a number of other tenants. So Lopez, 33, and her mother, Delmy Lopez, 65, made it a point to attend Friday's grand opening of the Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market. They stood patiently with about 200 other soon-to-be shoppers, waiting for the speeches to end so they could push their carts through the store's sliding doors.
September 20, 1985 | GARY LIBMAN
Los Angeles in 1860 was already a city of substantial brick buildings where cultured circles held "frequent card parties, balls, picnics, serenades, 'sociables' and suppers," according to a recent historical study. But the dusty pueblo was also "a center of crime, violence and vigilante action. Each week," according to another study, "the Star (newspaper) reported new killings and shooting sprees."
August 15, 2013
Of the many festivals putting down roots at L.A.'s State Historic Park in Chinatown, the H20 Fest might be the most curious. A melange of modern hip-hop and Latin music, this year sports headliner Pitbull alongside A Tribe Called Quest, Big Boi, La Santa Cecilia and scads more. Los Angeles State Historic Park, 1245 N. Spring St., Chinatown. 3 p.m. Sat. $39.50-$95. .
April 22, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Times reporter Frank Shyong and attorney David Chan will join L.A. Now Live at 9 a.m. Tuesday to discuss Chan's culinary journey to 6,297 Chinese restaurants .  Chan, a third-generation Chinese American, has been keeping track of every Chinese restaurant he's dined at since the early 1980s. He grew up with little to no knowledge of his culture, and eating Chinese food became a way of discovering it. Chan's appetite helped him discover unique slices of Chinese American immigrant life all over the nation.
December 22, 1987 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
On a high shelf in Henry Chang's bustling herb shop sits a glass jar with a coiled, plump rattlesnake drowned in whiskey. It is smiling. There are worse ways to die. "You want to drink some of my rattlesnake whiskey?" Chang offers. "It's good for you," says the agile, 84-year-old proprietor of Essential Chinese Herbs in Chinatown, for more than a century a supplier of herbs to doctors of traditional Oriental medicine in Los Angeles.
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