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Chinatown

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2010 | Times staff reports
Actor Joe Mantell, who was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in the 1955 film "Marty" and delivered one of film's most famous lines in "Chinatown," has died. He was 94. Mantell died of pneumonia Wednesday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, said his daughter Cathy. Mantell received an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor in 1956 for his performance as Angie, the best friend of Ernest Borgnine in "Marty. " His oft-repeated question to his sad-sack friend ?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Alarmed by plans for aWal-Martgrocery store in Chinatown, a city planning committee Tuesday approved a temporary ban on large retail chain stores setting up shop in the downtown district. In a 2-1 vote, members of the Los Angeles Planning and Land Use Management panel found that if the city doesn't act, an infusion of big-box stores could endanger the unique cultural character of Chinatown. The viability of the historic neighborhood is at risk, said committee Chairman Ed Reyes. Reyes and fellow committee member Jose Huizar instructed the city's Planning Department to prepare an ordinance that would temporarily ban chain stores larger than 20,000 square feet from gaining permits.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2013 | David Lazarus
Sometimes it's hard to do good. For example, donating leftover banquet food to charity. Shirley Wei Sher, a Marina del Rey immigration lawyer, discovered how challenging this can be when she recently tried to prevent leftovers at an upcoming meeting of the Southern California Chinese Lawyers Assn. from being thrown away. Sher, 33, sits on the board of the organization and is helping plan the group's annual awards banquet at a Chinatown restaurant next month. As many as 1,000 people are expected to attend.
BOOKS
May 29, 1994 | ROBERT TOWNE, "Chinatown" was issued in a limited edition by Neville Publishing (Santa Barbara) in 1983. In October, Robert Towne will publish " ' Chinatown, ' ' The Last Detail, ' ' Shampoo ' : Screenplays" with Grove Atlantic Press
It was in Eugene, Oregon, in April of 1971 that I ran across a public library copy of Carey McWilliams' "Southern California Country: An Island on the Land"--and with it the crime that formed the basis for "Chinatown." It wasn't the compendium of facts in the chapter "Water! Water! Water!" or indeed in the entire book. It was that Carey McWilliams wrote about Southern California with sensibilities my eye, ear, and nose recognized. Along with Chandler he made me feel that he'd not only walked down the same streets and into the same arroyo--he smelled the eucalyptus, heard the humming of high tension wires, saw the same bleeding Madras landscapes--and so a sense of deja vu was underlined by a sense of jamais vu: No writers had ever spoken as strongly to me about my home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1987 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
On a high shelf in Henry Chang's bustling herb shop sits a glass jar with a coiled, plump rattlesnake drowned in whiskey. It is smiling. There are worse ways to die. "You want to drink some of my rattlesnake whiskey?" Chang offers. "It's good for you," says the agile, 84-year-old proprietor of Essential Chinese Herbs in Chinatown, for more than a century a supplier of herbs to doctors of traditional Oriental medicine in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Times reporter Frank Shyong and attorney David Chan will join L.A. Now Live at 9 a.m. Tuesday to discuss Chan's culinary journey to 6,297 Chinese restaurants .  Chan, a third-generation Chinese American, has been keeping track of every Chinese restaurant he's dined at since the early 1980s. He grew up with little to no knowledge of his culture, and eating Chinese food became a way of discovering it. Chan's appetite helped him discover unique slices of Chinese American immigrant life all over the nation.
OPINION
July 24, 2004
Re "Political Wind Shifts in S.F.'s Chinatown," July 18: I agree with Rose Park's comment that the continual fighting between KMT [Kuomintang] in Taiwan and Communist China to win over the San Francisco Chinese does not advance causes of the Chinese community. Overseas Chinese communities have been used as battlegrounds in the past. This extension of the civil war in China since 1911 into major cities in North America has drained much-needed resources in the Chinese community to deal with local issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1985
Cimino's film "Year of the Dragon" and Sheila Benson's review of it, are both travesties of information (" 'Dragon'--A Compelling Look Inside Chinatown," Aug. 16). Benson implicates her woeful lack of knowledge of any Chinatown by calling the film "part documentary." "Year of the Dragon" is about as much a documentary as is a soft drink commercial. The real danger in this film is that it reinforces an unrealistic portrayal of people. Film and TV do influence us. If all we see are the Chinese as gangsters, women as victims and policemen as corrupt, we slowly begin to believe it. Benson's review sadly reinforces the celluloid image as a true one, and as such is an act of irresponsibility.
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