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Chinatown

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Alarmed by plans for aWal-Martgrocery store in Chinatown, a city planning committee Tuesday approved a temporary ban on large retail chain stores setting up shop in the downtown district. In a 2-1 vote, members of the Los Angeles Planning and Land Use Management panel found that if the city doesn't act, an infusion of big-box stores could endanger the unique cultural character of Chinatown. The viability of the historic neighborhood is at risk, said committee Chairman Ed Reyes. Reyes and fellow committee member Jose Huizar instructed the city's Planning Department to prepare an ordinance that would temporarily ban chain stores larger than 20,000 square feet from gaining permits.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
It wasn't long ago that Liz Lopez watched in dismay as the Vannord Shopping Center in her Panorama City neighborhood went downhill, losing its anchor, Valley Foods Warehouse, among a number of other tenants. So Lopez, 33, and her mother, Delmy Lopez, 65, made it a point to attend Friday's grand opening of the Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market. They stood patiently with about 200 other soon-to-be shoppers, waiting for the speeches to end so they could push their carts through the store's sliding doors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2011
Uan Rasey Trumpet player in 'Chinatown' and other films Uan Rasey, 90, a first-call trumpet player for MGM and other studio orchestras best known for his evocative solo in Roman Polanski's 1974 film "Chinatown," died Sept. 26 at Kaiser Permanente Woodland Hills Medical Center, said his grandson Tristan Verstraeten. The Studio City resident hadheart problems. Besides soloing in composerJerry Goldsmith's Oscar-nominated score for "Chinatown," Rasey played trumpet for many other film soundtracks, including "An American in Paris," "Ben-Hur," "Bye Bye Birdie," "Cleopatra," "Gigi," "How the West Was Won," "My Fair Lady," "Singin' in the Rain," "Spartacus" and "West Side Story.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2013 | David Lazarus
Sometimes it's hard to do good. For example, donating leftover banquet food to charity. Shirley Wei Sher, a Marina del Rey immigration lawyer, discovered how challenging this can be when she recently tried to prevent leftovers at an upcoming meeting of the Southern California Chinese Lawyers Assn. from being thrown away. Sher, 33, sits on the board of the organization and is helping plan the group's annual awards banquet at a Chinatown restaurant next month. As many as 1,000 people are expected to attend.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013
Of the many festivals putting down roots at L.A.'s State Historic Park in Chinatown, the H20 Fest might be the most curious. A melange of modern hip-hop and Latin music, this year sports headliner Pitbull alongside A Tribe Called Quest, Big Boi, La Santa Cecilia and scads more. Los Angeles State Historic Park, 1245 N. Spring St., Chinatown. 3 p.m. Sat. $39.50-$95. ticketmaster.com .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1987 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
On a high shelf in Henry Chang's bustling herb shop sits a glass jar with a coiled, plump rattlesnake drowned in whiskey. It is smiling. There are worse ways to die. "You want to drink some of my rattlesnake whiskey?" Chang offers. "It's good for you," says the agile, 84-year-old proprietor of Essential Chinese Herbs in Chinatown, for more than a century a supplier of herbs to doctors of traditional Oriental medicine in Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2008 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
This wisp of a town owes its existence to Chinese laborers who panned gold in the mid-1800s and laid railroad tracks linking Utah and Sacramento. Yet the immigrants were mostly ostracized, made to live in a wood-shack Chinatown that later was bulldozed to make way for Interstate 80. Now, their legacy is relegated to Larry De Leeuw's garage. On a recent afternoon, De Leeuw squeezed into a cubbyhole walled off from his power tools and bottle cap collection.
OPINION
July 24, 2004
Re "Political Wind Shifts in S.F.'s Chinatown," July 18: I agree with Rose Park's comment that the continual fighting between KMT [Kuomintang] in Taiwan and Communist China to win over the San Francisco Chinese does not advance causes of the Chinese community. Overseas Chinese communities have been used as battlegrounds in the past. This extension of the civil war in China since 1911 into major cities in North America has drained much-needed resources in the Chinese community to deal with local issues.
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