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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
James Cahill, an art historian and curator who played an influential role in expanding the study and teaching of Chinese painting in the West before and after the opening up of U.S.-China relations in the early 1970s, died Feb. 14 at his home in Berkeley. He was 87. The cause was complications of prostate cancer, said his daughter, Sarah Cahill . A longtime professor at UC Berkeley, Cahill was a dominant scholar in his field for 50 years. In the late 1950s, he was one of a small number of Western scholars permitted access to the imperial paintings that had been evacuated to Taiwan before the Chinese mainland fell under Communist rule.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Nine o'clock on a Saturday morning might seem a tad early for an art opening, but this one, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is particularly spirited. About 200 people -- trustees, patrons, museum curators and others, some of whom have flown in from Dallas and New York for the event -- stream into the lobby of LACMA's Resnick Pavilion, where a range of works have been staged across three galleries. At one end, a dapper man in a plaid sports jacket inspects an 18 th century painting by Antonio de Torres, “Virgin of Guadalupe,” with a magnifying glass (plucked from a bowl of them at the exhibit entrance)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Six people have been arrested on suspicion of stealing Chinese artifacts worth more than $32 million from two British museums. Police in London on Wednesday arrested two men suspected of the April 13 theft of 18 mostly jade antiques worth $29 million from Cambridge University's Fitzwilliam Museum. The Associated Press reports that on Tuesday, police arrested two men and two women in Walsall, a town in central England, suspected in a recent theft at Durham University's Oriental Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By David Ng
It measures only 8 centimeters, or about 3 inches, in diameter and couldn't even hold a cup of morning coffee. And yet it is worth $36 million.  Or at least someone was willing to pay that much. A 15th century porcelain cup from China sold at a Sotheby's auction in Hong Kong on Monday for $36 million. The item -- which is being called a "chicken cup" for its depiction of a rooster and other fowl on its side -- was purchased by mainland China billionaire and collector Liu Yiqian, according to reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Macau casino mogul paid $8.9 million for a bronze horse head, stolen 147 years ago from China's imperial palace, and plans to donate it to a Chinese museum. The horse head was originally scheduled for auction Oct. 9 by its previous Taiwanese owner, but Stanley Ho preempted the sale with his offer, Sotheby's said in a statement Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997 | COLL METCALFE
Cal Lutheran University will host a festival of Chinese art and culture beginning today and running until March 14. The festival will feature numerous art exhibits, painting demonstrations, a film screening and folk dances on the university campus at 60 W. Olsen Road. Throughout the festival, an exhibit of Chinese ink-and-brush paintings will be on display in the foyer of Pearson Library.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | JANET KINOSIAN, Janet Kinosian is a free-lance writer who occasionally contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
The dragon--a Chinese symbol for good fortune--takes center stage at the Children's Museum at La Habra during this month's exhibition of Chinese art. The exhibition, which runs through June 8, has a 30-foot, fire-breathing dragon made of colored paper bags stuffed with wads of paper and suspended from the center of one room's ceiling. Artwork from 51 of China's top student artists, as well as Chinese-style art done by children in the La Habra school district, is also on display.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2007 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
BEIJING -- If there was any fear that municipal authorities here might bulldoze the art district known as 798 for one more batch of bland condominiums -- a distinct possibility until just a few years ago -- this month's opening of the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art suggests that the area is eminently safe. Guy and Myriam Ullens, the Belgian benefactors behind the project, won't say how much they have invested in it. But the amount was clearly in the millions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In a significant boost to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's collection of Chinese art, museum officials announced Tuesday that LACMA trustee Eric Lidow and his wife, Leza, have donated 75 ancient Chinese works valued at a total of $3.5 million. The gift includes important bronze objects and prime examples of Buddhist sculpture. "This is the most valuable gift the department of Far Eastern art has ever received," said curator J. Keith Wilson, who heads the department.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
If Deng Lin, the daughter of Chinese elder statesman Deng Xiaoping, could recreate her life she would be born a boy. As a Chinese male, she would have had an easier time fulfilling her natural proclivities for a life of action and an art of bold innovation. And she wouldn't have spent so many years perfecting delicate flower paintings before creating "Distant Echoes," a strikingly expressionistic series of silk tapestries, part of which is on view at the Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena.
HOME & GARDEN
March 1, 2014 | By Scarlet Cheng
Spring seems only around the corner at Liu Fang Yuan, or the Garden of Flowing Fragrance, at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. Delicate pink cherry blossoms have begun to appear on trees, and dappled sunlight warms the stone walkways. There are other changes in the air at the Chinese Garden, as it is more informally known. Workers are putting finishing touches on new pavilions, walkways and landscaping as the newest garden in the Huntington's collection of more than a dozen readies its first expansion since its 2008 opening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
James Cahill, an art historian and curator who played an influential role in expanding the study and teaching of Chinese painting in the West before and after the opening up of U.S.-China relations in the early 1970s, died Feb. 14 at his home in Berkeley. He was 87. The cause was complications of prostate cancer, said his daughter, Sarah Cahill . A longtime professor at UC Berkeley, Cahill was a dominant scholar in his field for 50 years. In the late 1950s, he was one of a small number of Western scholars permitted access to the imperial paintings that had been evacuated to Taiwan before the Chinese mainland fell under Communist rule.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2014 | By Scarlet Cheng
NEW YORK - It's hard to break from the past. Even under the Chinese Cultural Revolution, which sought to smash the "Four Olds" of customs, culture, habits and ideas, the tradition of calligraphy was held in reverence, as it had been for centuries. Chairman Mao's own calligraphy served as nameplate for the powerful newspaper the People's Daily. "Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China," at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through April 6, ambitiously seeks to tie past with present through the work of 35 artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore
BEIJING -- One scene of the new documentary “Chimeras” shows the young Chinese artist Liu Gang wandering with his camera around a town in China that's been built to resemble an English village. Liu is in Thames Town, a development outside Shanghai that's eerily empty, aside from the couples posing in matching outfits for wedding photographs on faux cobbled streets. In a series of satirical, candid shots called “Better Life,” Liu explores China's conflicted aspirations. Our ideas of a better life, the artist explains, are “all indeed fantasies from the West.” Finnish filmmaker Mika Mattila's thought-provoking “Chimeras” -- which played this week at the San Francisco International Film Festival -- is a documentary about the search for a uniquely Chinese aesthetic in an international art world dominated by the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Scarlet Cheng
As a young boy in Taiwan, Jerry Yang was forced to study calligraphy - writing Chinese characters with a brush. The practice is thought to mold character as well as to reflect it, but Yang found it a tedious chore. In 1998, when he was turning 30 and had already co-founded Yahoo, he heeded the call to look back to his heritage and bought two Chinese calligraphies at auction. It was the beginning, he has written, of "a journey of discovery, inspiration, and fulfillment. " Today, his collection numbers 250 works, including some by the greatest calligraphers of the Ming and Qing eras, and 40 of them have been selected for "Out of Character: Decoding Chinese Calligraphy," a new exhibition at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco (through Jan. 13)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
When UC Santa Barbara professor Ann Jensen Adams, known for her work on 17th century Dutch painting, was given the chance to try a new research website from the Getty last week, she first typed in the name of a major artist and author in the search field: Karel van Mander. She was surprised to find online a full-text version of Van Mander's 1604 masterpiece, "Het Schilder-Boeck" (Book of Painters), which attempted to introduce Dutch and German painters like Vasari's classic "Lives of the Artists" did for so many Italians.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1998 | Scarlet Cheng, Scarlet Cheng is an occasional contributor to Calendar
"China is different from the U.S. in that way," says Chinese artist Xu Bing, who moved to this country in 1990. "Here, contemporary art is mainstream--in China it's not, it's still underground." And thus, the added frisson to a show such as "Inside Out: New Chinese Art," which opened last month at the Asia Society and P. S. 1 Contemporary Art Center in New York. It offers the heady lure of forbidden fruit, as well as the promise of insight into the psyche of that awakening giant: modern China.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1990 | STEVE APPLEFORD
When gallery director Louise Lewis first saw the photography and calligraphy collaborations that would become "The Garden of Chang Ta-ch'ien" exhibition, she hoped to reconstruct a living Chinese garden on the floor of the Cal State Northridge main art gallery. She had been inspired by the lush, graceful images of plum and lotus blossoms by photographer Hu Ch'ung-hsien, as embellished by the calligraphy and poetry of painter Chang Ta-ch'ien.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Six people have been arrested on suspicion of stealing Chinese artifacts worth more than $32 million from two British museums. Police in London on Wednesday arrested two men suspected of the April 13 theft of 18 mostly jade antiques worth $29 million from Cambridge University's Fitzwilliam Museum. The Associated Press reports that on Tuesday, police arrested two men and two women in Walsall, a town in central England, suspected in a recent theft at Durham University's Oriental Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Ed Asner has developed a knack during his extensive showbiz career for portraying crusty characters armed with a gruffness that camouflages a decent nature and good heart. Those traits were at the core of Asner's most famous role, the crotchety Lou Grant of the landmark "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and its dramatic "Lou Grant" spinoff. But there was a brief moment in Asner's past nearly 40 years ago when he went over to the dark side, playing a villain on CBS' "Hawaii Five-O. " On Monday's episode of the revamped "Hawaii Five-O," he gets to resurrect his bad-boy past.
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