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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001 | THUY-DOAN LE
Six-year-old Kevin Wei, wearing a red and black traditional Chinese hat with a long ponytail, sat transfixed by the movements of the brightly colored lions that were dancing rhythmically to the beating of the drum and clang of the cymbal. The Year of the Snake is coming, and Sun Yat Sen Chinese Institute ushered in the Chinese New Year at Chatsworth High School on Saturday morning. Following the lunar calendar, the Year of the Snake comes every 12 years, this year beginning Jan. 24.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
China's box office through the first three quarters was up 35% from last year, with contemporary-themed Chinese films drawing particularly large audiences. Yu Dong, chief executive of Nasdaq-listed Chinese movie studio and distributor Bona Film Group, was in Los Angeles this month for the Asia Society's U.S.-China Film Summit and meetings with Hollywood partners, including Fox International Productions. We caught up with him to talk about the state of the market and his studio's plans for 2014.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1990 | LINDA CHONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of onlookers lined the streets of Chinatown on Saturday to celebrate the Chinese New Year as groups of demonstrators stood among the crowd with banners to remind them of a float they would not see--a replica of the Goddess of Democracy. The Chinese Chamber of Commerce banned the 6-foot replica of the statue from entering the parade.
TRAVEL
June 9, 2013 | By Andrew Bender
NAGASAKI, Japan - On my first trip to Nagasaki, just out of college, I knew what most of the world knows: An atomic bomb fell here on Aug. 9, 1945, bringing World War II to a close. It wasn't until my second visit, more than 20 years later on a guidebook assignment, that I realized how much I had missed. Although the A-bomb is rightfully front and center for overseas visitors, the Japanese concept of the city is very different. As Japan's westernmost major port, it was the nation's first landing spot for Catholic missionaries and martyrs; red-bearded, waistcoated, fancy-hatted traders; and exotic foods borne by trade winds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1998 | VANESSA HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Lew is traveling halfway around the globe to better understand his family back in Los Angeles. On Tuesday, Lew and 1,000 other young Americans of Chinese descent will meet in Taiwan for a six-week cultural and language program subsidized by the island government.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the sickle of a new moon pierced the sky, signaling the beginning of the Chinese Lunar New Year, shopkeeper Wei Tang Kai did not dare celebrate. Here in the world's largest Islamic nation, it is against the law to publicly commemorate the holiday, display Chinese-language signboards or own Chinese books. But even more than the police, Wei fears his neighbors.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A summer-long "China Celebration" will bring acrobatic performers, new animal exhibits and an updated giant panda area to the San Diego Zoo . Photos : Panda Trek area set to open this summer at the San Diego Zoo Home to three giant pandas, the refreshed and rechristened Panda Trek area of the zoo is expected to open in late July or early August with new Asian-themed exhibits dedicated to antelope-like Sichuan takins, raccoon-like...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
The South Coast Chinese Culture Assn. will emphasize more than just food at the 19th annual Irvine Harvest Festival, which begins tonight and is expected to attract more than 30,000 people, according to event organizers. Traditional music, dance, brush painting and other arts will reflect how centuries of culture have influenced Chinese Americans today, according to program director John Su.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | MICHAEL GOTTLIEB
The Thousand Oaks Chinese School was started in 1975 with five students. Now, its student body has grown to more than 350 children who gather weekly to learn Chinese history, the arts and language. For Oak Park High School senior Richard Guo, the school has provided a doorway to his heritage, allowing him to communicate with his grandparents, who speak only Chinese. "I could barely write my name and count to 10," said Guo, who started at the school about four years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
After several months of searching, community leaders in Chinatown have gingerly taken the first step toward establishing a long-sought cultural center in the historic neighborhood. In two votes this week, one by the "founding board of directors" for a center and a second Thursday night by a local community group, the leaders selected a tentative site and developer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2012 | By Allan M. Jalon
SANTA BARBARA - Chinese scrolls often show landscapes of mountains, deep-cut gorges and paths that spiral through them and past caves in foliage. On these paths, often barely visible, smallish robed figures walk alone or sit in a group. Even people relatively familiar with this kind of art have peered at the finely drawn figures and wondered: Who are they? What are they up to? The Santa Barbara Museum of Art is offering an unusually comprehensive answer to such questions with a far-reaching show called "The Artful Recluse: Painting, Poetry, and Politics in 17th Century China.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A state ban on shark fins is being challenged in court by a group that says the law is unconstitutional and discriminatory toward Chinese culture. In October, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law prohibiting the possession, sale and distribution of the product, a delicacy long used in Chinese cuisine, specifically in soup. Violators of the ban could face up to six months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Supporters of the ban say that the fins are cruelly obtained — fishermen often slice them off live sharks that are then dumped back into the ocean because of the low demand for other shark meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
HONG KONG - A few days ago, an art professor from northern China named Li Xu was in a small Beijing gallery in the shadow of Tiananmen Square explaining the unlikely inspiration for one of his paintings: the $2.7-billion blockbuster "Avatar. " After the 34-year-old finally caught the film last year (it first opened in China in early 2010), Li wanted to see if he could marry the serenity he felt infused "Avatar"with the aesthetic of traditional Chinese painting, his primary medium.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A summer-long "China Celebration" will bring acrobatic performers, new animal exhibits and an updated giant panda area to the San Diego Zoo . Photos : Panda Trek area set to open this summer at the San Diego Zoo Home to three giant pandas, the refreshed and rechristened Panda Trek area of the zoo is expected to open in late July or early August with new Asian-themed exhibits dedicated to antelope-like Sichuan takins, raccoon-like...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
China and the West are embroiled today in lively, sometimes rancorous exchanges about Internet freedom and search-engine censorship. But since the late 1830s, another revolutionary technology, also imported from the West, has been radically reshaping Chinese culture, chronicling the nation's internal upheavals and providing a snapshot of its shifting relations with the outside world: photography. FOR THE RECORD: China photography: A photo caption with an article in the Feb. 23 Calendar on China photography exhibits at Southland museums misspelled the name of Li Hongzhang as Li Johngzhang.
WORLD
July 4, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Ruminah winces as she recalls the afternoon a mob ransacked her tiny hair salon, smashing windows and destroying both the business and her faith in justice in her homeland. More than a decade later, the reason she was attacked still haunts her: She is part Chinese. In May 1998, during two deadly days of racially fueled mayhem, rioters killed 1,000 people and raped 87 women, most of Chinese descent. Others cowered in their homes as the rape squads, reportedly led by army thugs, roamed the streets of Jakarta, the Indonesian capital.
WORLD
July 4, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Ruminah winces as she recalls the afternoon a mob ransacked her tiny hair salon, smashing windows and destroying both the business and her faith in justice in her homeland. More than a decade later, the reason she was attacked still haunts her: She is part Chinese. In May 1998, during two deadly days of racially fueled mayhem, rioters killed 1,000 people and raped 87 women, most of Chinese descent. Others cowered in their homes as the rape squads, reportedly led by army thugs, roamed the streets of Jakarta, the Indonesian capital.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A state ban on shark fins is being challenged in court by a group that says the law is unconstitutional and discriminatory toward Chinese culture. In October, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law prohibiting the possession, sale and distribution of the product, a delicacy long used in Chinese cuisine, specifically in soup. Violators of the ban could face up to six months in prison and a fine of up to $1,000. Supporters of the ban say that the fins are cruelly obtained — fishermen often slice them off live sharks that are then dumped back into the ocean because of the low demand for other shark meat.
OPINION
November 27, 2009 | By Robert Louis Chianese
In his Nov. 22 Times Op-Ed article, "Understanding China," Martin Jacques writes that we in the U.S. should not expect modern China to Westernize despite recent overtures of friendship and cooperation. He cites a long tradition in China of people seeing the state "as the guardian, custodian and embodiment of their civilization." Jacques writes that because the government is nearly synonymous with Chinese civilization, the people do not feel a natural antagonism to the state, as we do in the West.
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