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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Chinese authorities Monday were holding 11 Americans in Kunming on charges of distributing religious tracts. A U.S. official said that "we expect the matter to be resolved soon." The Americans, who went to China on June 13, were believed associated with an evangelical Christian group, the Latter Rain Ministry of Litchfield, Ill. State Department spokesman Adam Shub said that the charges against them were not considered serious under Chinese law and that an official was on his way from the U.S. Consulate in Chengdu to investigate.
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NEWS
November 20, 1994 | Associated Press
Seventy-three rare Siberian tigers saved from slaughter by Chinese law face starvation because the breeders who raised them for their bones can't afford to feed them. China recently began enforcing a ban on slaughtering the species that has saved the 73 tigers from slaughter but not from starvation at the China Feline Captive Breeding Center in Mudanjiang in Manchuria in northeastern China.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
China will be stricter on foreign performers after Icelandic singer Bjork shouted "Tibet! Tibet!" at the end of her concert in Shanghai this week, the Chinese government said Friday. A statement by China's Culture Ministry said Bjork's outburst "broke Chinese law and hurt Chinese people's feelings." Bjork shouted "Tibet!" after a performance of her song "Declare Independence" on Sunday. The outburst drew rare public attention inside China to Beijing's often harsh rule over the Himalayan region.
WORLD
June 15, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
LIJIN China - Six months pregnant, 38-year-old Ma Jihong was healthy and fit, her body toned from working in the cotton fields. So when 10 people from the local family planning office showed up one morning in October, she slipped through a gap in the concrete wall around the house and bolted like a sprinter toward the main road. Five-year-old Yanyan, the younger of Ma's two daughters, was alone in the house with her mother at the time. Her father came rushing in from the yard when he heard the screaming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Ching-Ching Ni
For his children, the mystery surrounding Joe Yee's past started with his name. Growing up in Sacramento, Steve Yee, now 56, remembers piling into his father's big Pontiac Streamliner to visit the Ong family association. The group's members welcomed his father in a Cantonese dialect and addressed him as one of their own. But Joe Yee never explained to his six American-born children why, if he were part of the group, his last name was not Ong. Odder still, their father claimed to be an only son, with no surviving relatives in China or America.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A group of major music companies is preparing to sue Yahoo China over complaints that the search engine violates copyrights by linking to websites that offer pirated music, the group's chairman said Tuesday. "Yahoo China have been blatantly infringing our members' rights," said John Kennedy of the International Federation of Phonographic Industries. "We are taking the preliminary steps required by Chinese law for filing a lawsuit."
WORLD
July 11, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
China's Foreign Ministry said Thursday that Dechan Pemba, a British citizen who had been a resident here since 2006 and who was deported Tuesday despite having a valid visa, was "a key member of a Tibetan separatist organization" and violated Chinese law while in Beijing. "When the Chinese police looked into her, Dechan also admitted her wrongdoing," said Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao, adding that the incident had nothing to do with tightened security before the Olympics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1988
A Van Nuys man was sentenced Friday to seven years in prison in the stabbing death of a Chinese student working as a night clerk at a Sepulveda Boulevard motel. Francisco Sanchez, 25, was sentenced after a plea bargain with prosecutors. The Los Angeles County district attorney's office dropped a murder charge and allowed Sanchez to plead guilty to voluntary manslaughter in exchange for the lighter sentence.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a case worthy of a James Bond thriller, a federal court has refused to dismiss indictments against three men accused of smuggling heroin inside dead goldfish. The action in U.S. District Court kept alive the government's case against Leung Tak Lun, Wong Tse Keung and Andrew Kit Wong, who are charged with three counts of conspiracy and accused of importing heroin-filled condoms inside goldfish.
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