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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Chinese authorities Monday were holding 11 Americans in Kunming on charges of distributing religious tracts. A U.S. official said that "we expect the matter to be resolved soon." The Americans, who went to China on June 13, were believed associated with an evangelical Christian group, the Latter Rain Ministry of Litchfield, Ill. State Department spokesman Adam Shub said that the charges against them were not considered serious under Chinese law and that an official was on his way from the U.S. Consulate in Chengdu to investigate.
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WORLD
August 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
American Christians whose 315 Bibles were confiscated by Chinese officials left the Kunming airport after a 26-hour standoff. Members of Vision Beyond Borders had said they would not leave the airport until Communist authorities returned the Bibles, taken from their checked luggage. But the group said the U.S. Embassy told them that Chinese law forbids bringing religious products into the nation for more than personal use. Pat Klein, a representative of the group, said he was told he could pick up the Bibles on his way out of the country.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2008 | From Reuters
Nike Inc. said it found falsified documents, underage workers and unpaid wages at suppliers in China, despite what experts say is one of the top social compliance regimes in the industry. The Beaverton, Ore.-based company's difficulties highlight the deep roots of some of the problems businesses face in manufacturing in China, particularly at a time of sharply rising costs and a stiffening legal environment. In its first country-specific supply chain report, which it said focused on China because of the upcoming Beijing Olympics, Nike detailed the efforts it has been making to get suppliers to comply with its code of conduct and Chinese law, including a program to monitor Olympics-related suppliers.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of China's biggest corporate collapses, the investment arm of Guangdong province declared bankruptcy Sunday, leaving debts of nearly $4.4 billion to mostly foreign lenders, who had believed the government would guarantee the loans. But in a lesson for both reckless Chinese borrowers and risk-taking foreign lenders, officials said Sunday that there were no guarantees on loans to Guangdong International Trust & Investment Corp.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | Associated Press
Seventy-three rare Siberian tigers saved from slaughter by Chinese law face starvation because the breeders who raised them for their bones can't afford to feed them. China recently began enforcing a ban on slaughtering the species that has saved the 73 tigers from slaughter but not from starvation at the China Feline Captive Breeding Center in Mudanjiang in Manchuria in northeastern China.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
China will be stricter on foreign performers after Icelandic singer Bjork shouted "Tibet! Tibet!" at the end of her concert in Shanghai this week, the Chinese government said Friday. A statement by China's Culture Ministry said Bjork's outburst "broke Chinese law and hurt Chinese people's feelings." Bjork shouted "Tibet!" after a performance of her song "Declare Independence" on Sunday. The outburst drew rare public attention inside China to Beijing's often harsh rule over the Himalayan region.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc.'s fight with China over Internet censorship made headlines around the world, but it has been engaged in similar battles around the globe. At least 25 countries, many of them with repressive regimes but even those with democracies, have at times blocked the public's access to Google over the last several years. All told, more than 40 countries actively censor the Internet, compared with a handful in 2004, which is when the OpenNet Initiative, a group of academics, began tracking global censorship.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A group of major music companies is preparing to sue Yahoo China over complaints that the search engine violates copyrights by linking to websites that offer pirated music, the group's chairman said Tuesday. "Yahoo China have been blatantly infringing our members' rights," said John Kennedy of the International Federation of Phonographic Industries. "We are taking the preliminary steps required by Chinese law for filing a lawsuit."
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