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WORLD
August 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
American Christians whose 315 Bibles were confiscated by Chinese officials left the Kunming airport after a 26-hour standoff. Members of Vision Beyond Borders had said they would not leave the airport until Communist authorities returned the Bibles, taken from their checked luggage. But the group said the U.S. Embassy told them that Chinese law forbids bringing religious products into the nation for more than personal use. Pat Klein, a representative of the group, said he was told he could pick up the Bibles on his way out of the country.
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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Chinese authorities Monday were holding 11 Americans in Kunming on charges of distributing religious tracts. A U.S. official said that "we expect the matter to be resolved soon." The Americans, who went to China on June 13, were believed associated with an evangelical Christian group, the Latter Rain Ministry of Litchfield, Ill. State Department spokesman Adam Shub said that the charges against them were not considered serious under Chinese law and that an official was on his way from the U.S. Consulate in Chengdu to investigate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Ching-Ching Ni
For his children, the mystery surrounding Joe Yee's past started with his name. Growing up in Sacramento, Steve Yee, now 56, remembers piling into his father's big Pontiac Streamliner to visit the Ong family association. The group's members welcomed his father in a Cantonese dialect and addressed him as one of their own. But Joe Yee never explained to his six American-born children why, if he were part of the group, his last name was not Ong. Odder still, their father claimed to be an only son, with no surviving relatives in China or America.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc.'s fight with China over Internet censorship made headlines around the world, but it has been engaged in similar battles around the globe. At least 25 countries, many of them with repressive regimes but even those with democracies, have at times blocked the public's access to Google over the last several years. All told, more than 40 countries actively censor the Internet, compared with a handful in 2004, which is when the OpenNet Initiative, a group of academics, began tracking global censorship.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | Associated Press
Seventy-three rare Siberian tigers saved from slaughter by Chinese law face starvation because the breeders who raised them for their bones can't afford to feed them. China recently began enforcing a ban on slaughtering the species that has saved the 73 tigers from slaughter but not from starvation at the China Feline Captive Breeding Center in Mudanjiang in Manchuria in northeastern China.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
China will be stricter on foreign performers after Icelandic singer Bjork shouted "Tibet! Tibet!" at the end of her concert in Shanghai this week, the Chinese government said Friday. A statement by China's Culture Ministry said Bjork's outburst "broke Chinese law and hurt Chinese people's feelings." Bjork shouted "Tibet!" after a performance of her song "Declare Independence" on Sunday. The outburst drew rare public attention inside China to Beijing's often harsh rule over the Himalayan region.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A group of major music companies is preparing to sue Yahoo China over complaints that the search engine violates copyrights by linking to websites that offer pirated music, the group's chairman said Tuesday. "Yahoo China have been blatantly infringing our members' rights," said John Kennedy of the International Federation of Phonographic Industries. "We are taking the preliminary steps required by Chinese law for filing a lawsuit."
WORLD
April 15, 2006 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
"You don't call. You never write. You won't eat my dumplings anymore!" Chinese mothers will not have to utter those words again if the powers that be have their way. In Shanghai, the Nanjing East Road Neighborhood Committee recently took to public shaming to ensure that people attend to their aging parents. Anyone who doesn't visit at least once every three months faces having his or her name posted on a community signboard.
MAGAZINE
November 8, 1987 | SAM BURCHELL, Sam Burchell is a former senior editor of Architectural Digest.
Different as their shops and their collections may be from one another, these 10merchant antiquarians do agree on at least one point: Los Angeles is fast becoming a world center of the antique trade. Though London, Paris and New York have the cachet of tradition, Los Angeles has other enviable qualities: style, vitality and youthful flair.
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