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WORLD
August 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
American Christians whose 315 Bibles were confiscated by Chinese officials left the Kunming airport after a 26-hour standoff. Members of Vision Beyond Borders had said they would not leave the airport until Communist authorities returned the Bibles, taken from their checked luggage. But the group said the U.S. Embassy told them that Chinese law forbids bringing religious products into the nation for more than personal use. Pat Klein, a representative of the group, said he was told he could pick up the Bibles on his way out of the country.
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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Chinese authorities Monday were holding 11 Americans in Kunming on charges of distributing religious tracts. A U.S. official said that "we expect the matter to be resolved soon." The Americans, who went to China on June 13, were believed associated with an evangelical Christian group, the Latter Rain Ministry of Litchfield, Ill. State Department spokesman Adam Shub said that the charges against them were not considered serious under Chinese law and that an official was on his way from the U.S. Consulate in Chengdu to investigate.
WORLD
June 15, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
LIJIN China - Six months pregnant, 38-year-old Ma Jihong was healthy and fit, her body toned from working in the cotton fields. So when 10 people from the local family planning office showed up one morning in October, she slipped through a gap in the concrete wall around the house and bolted like a sprinter toward the main road. Five-year-old Yanyan, the younger of Ma's two daughters, was alone in the house with her mother at the time. Her father came rushing in from the yard when he heard the screaming.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | Associated Press
Seventy-three rare Siberian tigers saved from slaughter by Chinese law face starvation because the breeders who raised them for their bones can't afford to feed them. China recently began enforcing a ban on slaughtering the species that has saved the 73 tigers from slaughter but not from starvation at the China Feline Captive Breeding Center in Mudanjiang in Manchuria in northeastern China.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
China will be stricter on foreign performers after Icelandic singer Bjork shouted "Tibet! Tibet!" at the end of her concert in Shanghai this week, the Chinese government said Friday. A statement by China's Culture Ministry said Bjork's outburst "broke Chinese law and hurt Chinese people's feelings." Bjork shouted "Tibet!" after a performance of her song "Declare Independence" on Sunday. The outburst drew rare public attention inside China to Beijing's often harsh rule over the Himalayan region.
WORLD
April 15, 2006 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
"You don't call. You never write. You won't eat my dumplings anymore!" Chinese mothers will not have to utter those words again if the powers that be have their way. In Shanghai, the Nanjing East Road Neighborhood Committee recently took to public shaming to ensure that people attend to their aging parents. Anyone who doesn't visit at least once every three months faces having his or her name posted on a community signboard.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A group of major music companies is preparing to sue Yahoo China over complaints that the search engine violates copyrights by linking to websites that offer pirated music, the group's chairman said Tuesday. "Yahoo China have been blatantly infringing our members' rights," said John Kennedy of the International Federation of Phonographic Industries. "We are taking the preliminary steps required by Chinese law for filing a lawsuit."
WORLD
August 25, 2010 | Megan K. Stack
Grave robbers and panda smugglers would no longer face the death penalty under criminal code changes being weighed by China, home to the world's most active executioners. A committee of the National People's Congress this week opened discussions on eliminating the death penalty as punishment for 13 crimes, including the smuggling of silver and gold, receipt fraud, tax cheating and the theft of fossils. Grave robbery and rare-animal smuggling are also among the crimes being considered for lighter sentences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1988
A Van Nuys man was sentenced Friday to seven years in prison in the stabbing death of a Chinese student working as a night clerk at a Sepulveda Boulevard motel. Francisco Sanchez, 25, was sentenced after a plea bargain with prosecutors. The Los Angeles County district attorney's office dropped a murder charge and allowed Sanchez to plead guilty to voluntary manslaughter in exchange for the lighter sentence.
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