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NATIONAL
December 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
Two Chinese Muslims can be held indefinitely in the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, even though their confinement is unlawful, a federal judge ruled Thursday. Abu Bakker Qassim and A'Del Abdu Al-Hakim, who were captured in Pakistan in 2001, had asked to be released after the government determined nine months ago that they were not "enemy combatants." U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 21, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams
The Obama administration Friday disclosed the identities of 55 prisoners who have been cleared for release from the Guantanamo Bay detention center for terrorism suspects. The reversal of its long-standing policy of keeping the names confidential means defense lawyers for the men no longer considered a threat to U.S. or international security can try to find countries willing to take them in. An additional 31 prisoners were cleared for transfer home or resettlement in third countries after a review of the grounds for holding each detainee ordered by President Obama shortly after he took office in January 2009.
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NATIONAL
June 11, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
The remote Pacific island nation of Palau at first glance may seem an unlikely destination for the 17 Chinese Muslims who have been imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, since 2002. But the answer to why Obama administration officials chose Palau for their resettlement came down to two main factors: its close relationship with the United States and its diplomatic recognition of Taiwan but not China.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The lawyers who spent years fighting to free prisoners at Guantanamo Bay thought they had won in 2008, when the Supreme Court gave detainees a right to go to court and Barack Obama was elected president. But things haven't worked out as they had hoped. Last month, President Obama reversed a campaign promise and announced plans to keep prisoners at Guantanamo indefinitely. Congress has blocked moving any prisoners from the Cuba detention center to this country, even for a trial.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Monday turned down a long-shot appeal filed on behalf of two Chinese Muslims held at Guantanamo Bay while the U.S. government tries to find a country to take them. The men's plight has posed a dilemma for courts and a public relations problem for the Bush administration. A federal judge said the detention of the ethnic Uighurs at the military prison in Cuba was unlawful but there was nothing courts could do.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | ITABARI NJERI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sophia and Jamillah Ma steal a minute to sit with a visitor at an out-of-the-way table in the China Islamic restaurant their family owns in Rosemead. They help run the business with four other siblings and in-laws. It is a bright, bustling place with a communal spirit and " halal --in English that means Kosher--food," says Jamillah Ma, her head covered with the hijab , or scarf, that many Muslim women wear.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2010 | By David G. Savage
The Supreme Court backed away Monday from a confrontation with the Obama administration and Congress over the handling of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, who are judged to be wrongly held as "enemy combatants." The justices dismissed a case brought on behalf of 17 Chinese Muslims, or Uighurs, who were held as prisoners at Guantanamo even after a judge ruled they deserved to go free. Congress and the Justice Department balked at a judge's plan to release them into the United States.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
Lawyers for 17 Chinese Muslims held at the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to order their clients' release into the United States. The Muslims, members of the Uighur minority from China's Xinjiang region, have been held without charge at Guantanamo Bay for more than seven years despite their military jailers' concession years ago that they posed no threat to the United States.
WORLD
June 14, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Sipping guava juice under cover from a steamy tropical downpour, Tommy Remengesau Jr. says he's always considered his Pacific island home a refuge from the troubles of the outside world. "While the rest of the planet was in conflict, waging its wars, we remained a little piece of paradise," the former Palauan president said as his pet fruit bat swayed upside down in a nearby cage. "Now, the world's headaches have come home to roost in Palau."
NATIONAL
September 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Obama administration says at least six, and as many as eight, Chinese Muslims held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, will soon leave their island prison for freedom on the island nation of Palau. Word of the transfer to the tiny Pacific Ocean country, planned for sometime after Oct. 1, came in a letter released Thursday from Solicitor General Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court. Kagan also confirmed that Palau had agreed to accept all but one of the 13 Chinese Muslims, or Uighurs, who remain at Guantanamo.
OPINION
February 21, 2011
It's a high compliment when someone seeks to live in a country that imprisoned and abused him. That's what five Chinese Muslims held at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility want to do, but they're encountering resistance from the Justice Department. It is urging the Supreme Court not to review an appeals court decision holding that a judge may not release them into this country. The Muslims, members of an ethnic group called the Uighurs who want independence from China, had traveled to Afghanistan, where Uighur military training camps had been set up. After the United States launched a military offensive in Afghanistan, they and others were captured by Pakistani and other coalition forces and brought to Guantanamo.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2010 | By David G. Savage
The Supreme Court backed away Monday from a confrontation with the Obama administration and Congress over the handling of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, who are judged to be wrongly held as "enemy combatants." The justices dismissed a case brought on behalf of 17 Chinese Muslims, or Uighurs, who were held as prisoners at Guantanamo even after a judge ruled they deserved to go free. Congress and the Justice Department balked at a judge's plan to release them into the United States.
OPINION
October 30, 2009
Virtually the first order of business for Barack Obama after his inauguration was a series of executive orders aimed at closing the detention center at Guantanamo Bay within a year and providing for a fair disposition of charges against the remaining detainees there. His break with Bush administration policies garnered extravagant -- and premature -- praise. Thanks to presidential procrastination and congressional resistance, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. recently said that the Jan. 22 deadline "will be difficult to meet."
NATIONAL
September 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Obama administration says at least six, and as many as eight, Chinese Muslims held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, will soon leave their island prison for freedom on the island nation of Palau. Word of the transfer to the tiny Pacific Ocean country, planned for sometime after Oct. 1, came in a letter released Thursday from Solicitor General Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court. Kagan also confirmed that Palau had agreed to accept all but one of the 13 Chinese Muslims, or Uighurs, who remain at Guantanamo.
WORLD
June 14, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Sipping guava juice under cover from a steamy tropical downpour, Tommy Remengesau Jr. says he's always considered his Pacific island home a refuge from the troubles of the outside world. "While the rest of the planet was in conflict, waging its wars, we remained a little piece of paradise," the former Palauan president said as his pet fruit bat swayed upside down in a nearby cage. "Now, the world's headaches have come home to roost in Palau."
NATIONAL
June 12, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes and Janet Hook
The Obama administration has virtually abandoned plans to resettle in the United States some detainees from the military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, officials said, a recognition that the task had become politically impossible because of congressional opposition.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Thursday that he expected staunch opposition in Congress to the Obama administration's plans to release some of the Chinese Muslims detained at Guantanamo into the United States. Confirming the plans for the first time, Gates said that the administration intended to release some of the 17 Chinese Uighurs into the U.S. as part of the process of closing the prison, although he added that a final decision had not been made.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
The remote Pacific island nation of Palau at first glance may seem an unlikely destination for the 17 Chinese Muslims who have been imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, since 2002. But the answer to why Obama administration officials chose Palau for their resettlement came down to two main factors: its close relationship with the United States and its diplomatic recognition of Taiwan but not China.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Thursday that he expected staunch opposition in Congress to the Obama administration's plans to release some of the Chinese Muslims detained at Guantanamo into the United States. Confirming the plans for the first time, Gates said that the administration intended to release some of the 17 Chinese Uighurs into the U.S. as part of the process of closing the prison, although he added that a final decision had not been made.
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