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NEWS
December 6, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU
Wu Fang, a UCLA graduate student, had hoped to return home to China to do research on early childhood education. But the bloody crackdown in Beijing last June changed all that. "Now, absolutely, I can't go," says Wu, who has participated in pro-democracy rallies and is active in the Chinese student association on campus. Wu, 35, believes that if she goes back, she will be interrogated and perhaps even arrested for expressing her political views in this country.
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NEWS
October 27, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last four weeks, the Bush Administration has permitted Chinese military officers to return to work in the United States on the ground-breaking $500-million arms sales program from which they were excluded after the Chinese army's bloody crackdown on student demonstrations last June. The Chinese officers' quiet return to a U.S. military base and to facilities of the Grumman Corp.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring a veto warning, the Senate on Monday gave final congressional approval to a bill that would allow an estimated 30,000 Chinese students to remain in the United States indefinitely rather than risk punishment for pro-democracy views if they return home. The Senate's action by voice vote followed a unanimous 403-0 vote by the House in favor of the legislation. The Bush Administration opposes the bill on grounds that its enactment would end educational exchanges with the Beijing regime.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
Wuer Kaixi, one of the leaders of the student pro-democracy movement in China, will be a visiting undergraduate student at Harvard College during the 1989-90 school year, according to Harvard officials. Wuer was chairman of the Beijing Universities Students Autonomous United Assn., the unofficial union that coordinated the majority of student demonstrations in Tian An Men Square.
NEWS
February 15, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fifty-three Chinese nationals jailed by the Immigration and Naturalization Service since 1993 are being released, the Clinton administration announced. The 53 had been awaiting decisions on their requests for political asylum since the freighter trying to smuggle them into the United States ran aground off New York City in June 1993. Ten of the 277 passengers aboard the Golden Venture died trying to swim ashore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1989 | ASHLEY DUNN, Times Staff Writer
Four leading Chinese dissidents who fled their homeland shortly after the brutal crackdown around Tian An Men Square said Friday that the future of democracy in China depends on Western nations influencing reform through economic sanctions. The dissidents, who made their first appearance in Southern California at a press conference at Caltech, were led by Wuer Kaixi and Yan Jiaqi, two of the best-known pro-democracy leaders from China.
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the developments that have colored the last 20 years of U.S.-Chinese relations, among the most important is the wave of Chinese students who have traveled to America to study. Since 1979, when paramount leader Deng Xiaoping assumed power and opened China to the West, more than 250,000 students--the best and brightest of China's youth--have made the academic pilgrimage abroad, at least half to the United States.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's mission to Beijing was alternately denounced as "bowing and scraping to the butchers of Beijing" and praised as a successful overture during a House subcommittee meeting Wednesday. The opposing views on last weekend's surprise visit to China by National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft and Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger foreshadowed an emotional debate in January when Congress returns.
NEWS
November 22, 1993 | Reuters
A Chinese multimillionaire who won $4.74 million when he backed a long-shot horse by mistake at the races last month has donated his winnings to the education of mainland Chinese in the United States, a local newspaper said Sunday. Larry Yung has set up a $5-million scholarship fund for mainland Chinese students to study at Stanford University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1996 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Thirty students from the People's Republic of China--thought to be that nation's future leaders--are spending a year at Hale Middle School, learning the American way. The students are the second group of sixth- through eighth-graders to attend Hale from China, sent by a private boarding school. The smiles on the students' faces and easy demeanor in their classes and on the playground belie a serious devotion to their studies.
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