Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChocolate Milk
IN THE NEWS

Chocolate Milk

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 11, 2010
Chocolate milk has become a somewhat volatile liquid. In a food fight that's been raging for the past few years, some have called on schools to ban the beverage for children because of its high sugar content; the National Dairy Council struck back with a "Raise Your Hand for Chocolate Milk" campaign. A cup of chocolate milk has about 24 grams to 30 grams of sugar; regular whole milk has about 11 grams to 13 grams of sugar. (For more, read the Los Angeles Times story "Should chocolate milk be allowed in schools?"
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias has been promoted over the last few years as a way to reduce the sugar kids consume and decried as a sure way to keep kids from getting the nutrients in milk. Both might be the case, researchers at Cornell University say. “On average, milk sales drop by 10%, 29% of white milk gets thrown out, and participation in the school lunch program may also decrease,” reported Andrew Hanks, research associate at Cornell's Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management.
Advertisement
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Brendan Borrell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver visited an elementary school in America's "fattest" city, Huntington, W.Va., he saw the children tossing out fresh fruit in favor of processed chicken nuggets and chowing down on egg pizza for breakfast. But it was the sugar-laden chocolate milk that would stick in his mind, as he recounted this year in a speech he gave when receiving a TED Prize. "It epitomizes the trouble we're in, guys," said the star of ABC's "Food Revolution," a show that promoted healthy eating in public schools.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014
Lakers' ownership announces they've signed Kobe to a max contract without knowing the status of his health, Phil announces he's signing with the Knicks, and Webster's dictionary announces they're putting a picture of Jim next to the word "Blunderbuss. " Jerry Leibowitz Culver City :: You could put Phil Jackson, Pat Riley and Jerry West in the Lakers' front office and they still wouldn't be able to surround the aging $24-million-per-year Kobe Bryant with enough talent to resurrect the Lakers in one or two years because there isn't enough room left under the salary cap. Bryant will just have to endure his frustration over the Lakers losing all the way to the bank.
OPINION
August 21, 2011 | By Frederick J. Zimmerman and Beth Warshawsky Ricanati
The Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District is scheduled to vote this week on whether students need sugar to make healthy choices. Of course, the vote won't be structured that way, but sugar is what's at stake. The school board will vote on whether the district should eliminate sugared milk from its lunchtime offerings. Sugar will not go quietly. Last year, 76% of the milk served in the district was chocolate-flavored. Because each half-pint carton of flavored milk contains 8 grams more sugar than skim milk, last year alone about 5,600 pounds of added sugar was smuggled into children's diets through flavored milk.
OPINION
June 17, 2011
By all means, let's contribute to the health of children by reducing the amount of sugar they consume. Sugar provides little nutrition and no fiber, just loads of empty calories. Increasingly, it is implicated in the nation's higher obesity and diabetes rates. The sugar we drink seems to be particularly troublesome; various studies have found that sugar in liquid form doesn't make people feel satiated, so they consume yet more calories. The Los Angeles Unified School District's new ban on chocolate milk and other flavored, sweetened milks is one way to reduce such sugar consumption.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2009 | By John Keilman and Tara Malone
The dairy industry recently rolled out an expensive media campaign in praise of chocolate milk, a classic school lunch drink that's under assault for its sugar content. As trade groups spend upward of $1 million to defend the drink, three fifth-graders have come to its rescue. A year after the school district in Barrington, Ill., banned flavored milk from its elementary- and middle-school lunch menus, students persuaded administrators to give it another chance. "Kids weren't drinking the white milk," said Haley Morris, 10. "It's better to have the chocolate milk than nothing."
NATIONAL
November 16, 2009 | By John Keilman and Tara Malone
The dairy industry recently rolled out an expensive media campaign in praise of chocolate milk, a classic school lunch drink that's under assault for its sugar content. But as trade groups spend upward of $1 million to defend the drink, three fifth-graders have come to its rescue. A year after the school district in Barrington, Ill., banned flavored milk from its elementary- and middle-school lunch menus, the students persuaded administrators to give it another chance. "Kids weren't drinking the white milk," said Haley Morris, 10. "It's better to have the chocolate milk than nothing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Students in the Santa Monica-Malibu school district have grown accustomed to whole wheat pasta and lunchtime salad bars, with vegetables delivered fresh every day from a farmers market. But to the chagrin of some healthful food advocates and parents, chocolate milk will continue to be served too. The school board debated late into the night Wednesday before deciding to keep it on the menu. But parents can request that their children not receive chocolate milk. Like many districts across the country, the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District had joined the debate about whether the calcium that is valuable for growing children is worth the trade-off of sugar and calories that come with the flavored milk.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Chocolate milk in the cafeteria contributes to obesity in children, says one side. But without it, kids might not consume enough calcium, argues the other side. As school districts across the nation consider banning the cafeteria milk of choice (as well as strawberry-flavored milk), here’s a quick break down of the calorie content of chocolate milk from Fitday :  “Whole chocolate milk, made from whole milk, has the most fat and calories. An 8 oz. glass has 210 calories.” “Reduced fat chocolate milk is made from either 1% or 2% milk, and an 8 oz. glass has 160 to 170 calories.” “Skim chocolate milk, made from skim milk, is lowest in calories at 160 for an 8 oz. glass.” Chocolate adds about 60 calories to white milk—an addition that, if not done in moderation, could add several pounds by the end of one year (this article estimates 10 pounds)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Most people heading to McDonald's know what to expect: They can get a cheeseburger, fries and a drink. And in November, kids can also get something to read -- 20 million somethings. McDonald's will distribute 20 million print books in Happy Meals from Nov. 1-14. Each book will feature a McDonald's Happy Meal character and, according to the press release, "brings nutrition, imagination and play to life in a fun way. " A similar program was launched in England in January after a successful pilot project.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Mary MacVean, This post has been updated. See below for details.
Much of the recent debate over serving milk to children has been about flavored milk: Should it be distributed in schools? Or should the only milk given to children be of the unflavored, reduced-fat variety? Two Harvard scientists known for questioning the conventional wisdom are challenging the idea of making lower-fat milks the only milk options available to children. They note that guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and many health organizations recommend limiting the consumption of beverages that contain calories - such as soda and juice - “except reduced-fat milk, of which people in most age groups are encourage to consume three cups daily.” David Ludwig and Walter Willett question “the scientific rationale for promoting reduced-fat milk consumption at these levels.” They suggest that until there are additional studies, guidelines for milk consumption should designate a range of perhaps zero to three cups, avoid recommending low-fat over whole milk and focus on limiting consumption of flavored milks.
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
LONDON -- Jessica Hardy emerged from the Olympic pool on Friday, clutching the drink that would aid her in recovering from her performance. Not water. Not Gatorade. Not some special sports drink. Hardy was chugging chocolate milk. "I won't do energy drinks, with my supplement history," Hardy said. "Chocolate milk is as good as it gets. " Hardy qualified for the Olympics four years ago, then withdrew after testing positive for a banned substance. Hardy satisfied arbitrators that a contaminated supplement was to blame, and the International Olympic Committee reinstated her last year.
FOOD
February 3, 2012 | By David R. Just and Brian Wansink
Last fall, Los Angeles took a hard line on school nutrition. In an attempt to mold better eating habits in kids, the Los Angeles Unified School District eliminated flavored milk, chicken nuggets and other longtime childhood favorites. But instead of making kids healthier, the changes sent students fleeing from school cafeterias. There have been reports of a thriving trade in black-market junk food, of pizzas delivered to side doors and of family-sized bags of chips being brought from home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Students in the Santa Monica-Malibu school district have grown accustomed to whole wheat pasta and lunchtime salad bars, with vegetables delivered fresh every day from a farmers market. But to the chagrin of some healthful food advocates and parents, chocolate milk will continue to be served too. The school board debated late into the night Wednesday before deciding to keep it on the menu. But parents can request that their children not receive chocolate milk. Like many districts across the country, the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District had joined the debate about whether the calcium that is valuable for growing children is worth the trade-off of sugar and calories that come with the flavored milk.
OPINION
August 21, 2011 | By Frederick J. Zimmerman and Beth Warshawsky Ricanati
The Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District is scheduled to vote this week on whether students need sugar to make healthy choices. Of course, the vote won't be structured that way, but sugar is what's at stake. The school board will vote on whether the district should eliminate sugared milk from its lunchtime offerings. Sugar will not go quietly. Last year, 76% of the milk served in the district was chocolate-flavored. Because each half-pint carton of flavored milk contains 8 grams more sugar than skim milk, last year alone about 5,600 pounds of added sugar was smuggled into children's diets through flavored milk.
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
LONDON -- Jessica Hardy emerged from the Olympic pool on Friday, clutching the drink that would aid her in recovering from her performance. Not water. Not Gatorade. Not some special sports drink. Hardy was chugging chocolate milk. "I won't do energy drinks, with my supplement history," Hardy said. "Chocolate milk is as good as it gets. " Hardy qualified for the Olympics four years ago, then withdrew after testing positive for a banned substance. Hardy satisfied arbitrators that a contaminated supplement was to blame, and the International Olympic Committee reinstated her last year.
SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias has been promoted over the last few years as a way to reduce the sugar kids consume and decried as a sure way to keep kids from getting the nutrients in milk. Both might be the case, researchers at Cornell University say. “On average, milk sales drop by 10%, 29% of white milk gets thrown out, and participation in the school lunch program may also decrease,” reported Andrew Hanks, research associate at Cornell's Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management.
OPINION
June 17, 2011
By all means, let's contribute to the health of children by reducing the amount of sugar they consume. Sugar provides little nutrition and no fiber, just loads of empty calories. Increasingly, it is implicated in the nation's higher obesity and diabetes rates. The sugar we drink seems to be particularly troublesome; various studies have found that sugar in liquid form doesn't make people feel satiated, so they consume yet more calories. The Los Angeles Unified School District's new ban on chocolate milk and other flavored, sweetened milks is one way to reduce such sugar consumption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2011 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
An item that's on millions of kids' meal trays once or twice a day has become the subject of a food fight in school districts around the country, called everything from part of a healthy diet to "soda in drag. " How could a half-pint carton of chocolate milk be so complicated? The new superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, John Deasy, said he will recommend that the school board eliminate chocolate- and strawberry-flavored milk in its next dairy contract for the 650,000 meals it serves daily.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|