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Cholesterol

NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
To truly keep the doctor away, it’s going to take more than a handful of red delicious. The fruit and vegetable aisle is a fine place to start your quest to lower cholesterol, but don’t stop there. Keep moving, keep moving....  This week we learned that eating dried apples  can help reduce “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein, while raising “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein – at least when compared to eating dried plums (aka prunes)
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NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Eating a low-calorie diet in which carbs have a heavier presence at dinner may offer a host of healthful benefits, a study finds. Researchers randomly assigned 100 obese male and female Israeli police officers age 25 to 55 to one of two diets for six months: a standard low-calorie diet (this served as the control group), or a low-calorie diet that offered more carbs at dinner. Both diets contained about 1,300 to 1,500 calories per day. Nutritional breakdowns were the same for both groups as well: 20% protein, 30% to 35% fat, and 45% to 50% carbohydrate.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The use of fibrates and fenofibrates to reduce cholesterol levels has grown sharply in the United States over the past decade, despite mounting evidence that the drugs provide little benefit, researchers reported Tuesday. Moreover, physicians are increasingly prescribing brand-name versions of the drugs, such as TriCor and Trilipix, despite the fact that published evidence so far shows a benefit only for generic forms of the drugs, such as gemfibrozil, researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
HEALTH
February 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Strength training has strong-armed its way beyond the realm of bodybuilding. A growing body of research shows that working out with weights has health benefits beyond simply bulking up one's muscles and strengthening bones. Studies are finding that more lean muscle mass may allow kidney dialysis patients to live longer, give older people better cognitive function, reduce depression, boost good cholesterol, lessen the swelling and discomfort of lymphedema after breast cancer and help lower the risk of diabetes.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Eggs are getting a bit of a reprieve on the cholesterol front. A U.S. Department of Agriculture report released Tuesday says eggs are lower in cholesterol and higher in vitamin D than previously thought.   The federal agency released these findings (helpfully publicized by the egg industry) after testing a random sample of eggs across the country and examining their nutrient value. It found the average large egg contained 185 milligrams of cholesterol (14% less than prior measures)
HEALTH
February 7, 2011 | By Jill U. Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you want to improve the health and fitness of your heart and blood vessels, you can. Basic lifestyle changes involving diet, exercise and smoking can make a big difference. It also helps to keep an eye on some key numbers, including blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index and blood glucose. Last year, the American Heart Assn. winnowed all this advice into a checklist called Life's Simple Seven. For each item on the list, the AHA set criteria that define ideal cardiovascular health.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Obesity rates around the world have about doubled between 1980 and 2008, but not all the news is bad--some countries have shown a decline in average blood pressure and cholesterol levels and a leveling off of body mass index. The news comes via several studies released Thursday in the Lancet , which detail how various countries and regions are faring in terms of BMI, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Overall, between 1980 and 2008, global BMI increased on average 0.4 to 0.5 kilograms (about 0.9 to 1.1 pounds)
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The cluster of symptoms collectively known as a metabolic syndrome heighten the prospect that with age will come steep cognitive decline, a new study has found.  Researchers followed 7,087 French people over 65 for four years to see what factors were most clearly linked to losses in mental performance that fell short of dementia. Many seniors--including 15.8% of the sample--are diagnosed with metabolic syndrome , defined by these researchers as having two of the following five biomarkers: high blood pressure, a large waist circumference, a high  overall cholesterol reading , a particularly low score on HDL (or "good")
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
One out of every three adult Americans has high cholesterol levels and two-thirds of them do not have it under control, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. Similarly, one out of every three adults has high blood pressure and half of them do not have it under control. High blood pressure and high cholesterol are two of the major risk factors for heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, which are the leading cause of death in the United States, killing 800,000 people every year.
HEALTH
January 24, 2011 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My doctor prescribed Vytorin for high cholesterol. While my cholesterol went from over 350 to 190 in five weeks, I ended up having an eight-hour episode of transient global amnesia (TGA). I knew who I was, and I recognized my family and friends, but I didn't know the year. I didn't recognize streets I have driven for many years. I asked my husband the same five questions in the hospital over and over until late in the evening, when my memory returned. I immediately went off Vytorin.
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