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Chondroitin

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HEALTH
July 19, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
My husband and I are in our 50s. We are having much pain from arthritis. His is in his knees. I have had my thumb joint removed due to osteoarthritis, and now I am told I need hip-replacement surgery. Glucosamine and chondroitin seemed to help for a while, but now we are back to limping. What can you tell us about the benefits and risks of these supplements? Are there any other options? A large government-sponsored study of glucosamine and chondroitin for arthritis of the knee determined that these supplements were no better than a placebo for mild to moderate arthritis (Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases online, June 4)
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HEALTH
August 30, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I took glucosamine and chondroitin for about seven months. I had gotten little relief for my back pain, but I was willing to continue it to see if eventually it would help. Around that time, I had blood work done and found that my cholesterol had jumped from under 200 to 239. I had made no changes in lifestyle or diet other than these supplements. I haven't taken any since. Dozens of readers report a rise in cholesterol associated with taking glucosamine and chondroitin. In many cases, cholesterol levels go back down after the supplements are discontinued.
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SCIENCE
April 17, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
Chondroitin, a dietary supplement widely used for treating arthritic joints, is no better than a placebo for reducing pain, researchers reported Monday. The study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, looked at data from 20 clinical trials encompassing 3,846 patients. "People had the idea that this could be the magic bullet for osteoarthritis, but it cannot be," said Dr. Peter Juni, a medical epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland and one of the authors of the study.
HEALTH
July 19, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
My husband and I are in our 50s. We are having much pain from arthritis. His is in his knees. I have had my thumb joint removed due to osteoarthritis, and now I am told I need hip-replacement surgery. Glucosamine and chondroitin seemed to help for a while, but now we are back to limping. What can you tell us about the benefits and risks of these supplements? Are there any other options? A large government-sponsored study of glucosamine and chondroitin for arthritis of the knee determined that these supplements were no better than a placebo for mild to moderate arthritis (Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases online, June 4)
HEALTH
October 15, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Americans with osteoarthritis of the knee may need to wait a little longer for proof that three common approaches actually work. In a review of 42 randomized controlled trials on hyaluronic acid injections, 21 studies on the supplements glucosamine and chondroitin and 23 articles on arthroscopy, researchers at the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assn.
HEALTH
November 21, 2005 | Jonathan Bor, Baltimore Sun
A clinical trial of the popular dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin found no evidence that they're better than placebos in easing arthritic knee pain, the study's lead investigator has reported. The good news: Like placebos, the supplements aren't harmful either. The government-sponsored trial involving 1,600 arthritis sufferers at 16 medical centers across the country was designed to see whether the supplements lived up to their billing as potent weapons against arthritis.
HEALTH
August 30, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I took glucosamine and chondroitin for about seven months. I had gotten little relief for my back pain, but I was willing to continue it to see if eventually it would help. Around that time, I had blood work done and found that my cholesterol had jumped from under 200 to 239. I had made no changes in lifestyle or diet other than these supplements. I haven't taken any since. Dozens of readers report a rise in cholesterol associated with taking glucosamine and chondroitin. In many cases, cholesterol levels go back down after the supplements are discontinued.
HEALTH
February 22, 2010 | Elena Conis
With more than 46 million Americans diagnosed with arthritis, the market for joint pain supplements is enormous — and only set to grow as baby boomers age. "I call it the quiet epidemic," says Dr. Thomas Vangsness, professor of orthopedic surgery and chief of sports medicine at the USC Keck School of Medicine. But while the variety of joint pain supplements just keeps growing, just a few have been well studied, and even fewer have been shown to work. Yucca root, mangosteen juice and fish oil supplements are often touted as remedies for joint pain, but although some lab studies indicate they might help fight inflammation, there's no solid evidence that any of them relieve the symptoms of arthritis in people.
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Elizabeth Large, The Baltimore Sun
If you'd guessed 20 years ago what the "it" drug of the new millennium would be, at least for baby boomers, you probably wouldn't have said a pill made from shellfish shells and cow trachea. The pill -- a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin -- is popular with aging boomers because it may ease the pain of arthritis. It's also the treatment of choice for their beloved aging pets. Can you get any more with-it than that?
HEALTH
April 7, 2008 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The product: All sorts of painkillers can offer comfort to people with arthritis, but none of them can give new life to worn-out joints. If you've squandered your personal supply of cartilage in your knees or hips, a truckload of Aleve won't bring it back. For decades, arthritis experts and patients have looked for remedies that do more than mask the pain. This quest has turned glucosamine and chondroitin into superstars of the supplement industry. With U.S.
HEALTH
February 22, 2010 | Elena Conis
With more than 46 million Americans diagnosed with arthritis, the market for joint pain supplements is enormous — and only set to grow as baby boomers age. "I call it the quiet epidemic," says Dr. Thomas Vangsness, professor of orthopedic surgery and chief of sports medicine at the USC Keck School of Medicine. But while the variety of joint pain supplements just keeps growing, just a few have been well studied, and even fewer have been shown to work. Yucca root, mangosteen juice and fish oil supplements are often touted as remedies for joint pain, but although some lab studies indicate they might help fight inflammation, there's no solid evidence that any of them relieve the symptoms of arthritis in people.
HEALTH
October 15, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Americans with osteoarthritis of the knee may need to wait a little longer for proof that three common approaches actually work. In a review of 42 randomized controlled trials on hyaluronic acid injections, 21 studies on the supplements glucosamine and chondroitin and 23 articles on arthroscopy, researchers at the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assn.
SCIENCE
April 17, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
Chondroitin, a dietary supplement widely used for treating arthritic joints, is no better than a placebo for reducing pain, researchers reported Monday. The study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, looked at data from 20 clinical trials encompassing 3,846 patients. "People had the idea that this could be the magic bullet for osteoarthritis, but it cannot be," said Dr. Peter Juni, a medical epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland and one of the authors of the study.
HEALTH
November 21, 2005 | Jonathan Bor, Baltimore Sun
A clinical trial of the popular dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin found no evidence that they're better than placebos in easing arthritic knee pain, the study's lead investigator has reported. The good news: Like placebos, the supplements aren't harmful either. The government-sponsored trial involving 1,600 arthritis sufferers at 16 medical centers across the country was designed to see whether the supplements lived up to their billing as potent weapons against arthritis.
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Elizabeth Large, The Baltimore Sun
If you'd guessed 20 years ago what the "it" drug of the new millennium would be, at least for baby boomers, you probably wouldn't have said a pill made from shellfish shells and cow trachea. The pill -- a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin -- is popular with aging boomers because it may ease the pain of arthritis. It's also the treatment of choice for their beloved aging pets. Can you get any more with-it than that?
HEALTH
December 4, 2000 | Barrie R. Cassileth
My friend Paul is a retired air traffic controller. A former B-24 bomber pilot in World War II, he has kept himself fit and healthy. Now in his 70s, he regularly works out, swims, bikes, hikes and works as a volunteer maintaining a section of the Appalachian Trail in his spare time. A few years ago, his knees started hurting. Sometimes they were so painful, he couldn't walk. Paul is one of the more than 6 million older Americans with osteoarthritis.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
An analysis of 10 studies involving more than 3,800 people has found that glucosamine and chondroitin supplements for joint pain are ineffective either alone or in combination. Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements have been popular for years among people with arthritic knees or hips. According to the authors of the study, worldwide sales of the supplements reached almost $2 billion in 2008. Previous studies on whether the drugs work to relieve arthritis pain, however, have been conflicting.
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