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SCIENCE
November 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Why are some musical chords so inherently pleasing while others sound so obviously dissonant? A study of a group of people with the genetic condition amusia, which causes sufferers to incorrectly perceive pitch, may have the answer: Nice-sounding, or consonant, chords have a property called “harmonicity” while dissonant chords lack it.  The study was published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The finding contradicts the theory to which most acoustics researchers subscribe, that a property called “beating” is responsible for dissonance.
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WORLD
February 21, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
TEL AVIV - Before the Israeli rock band 9 Lives takes the stage, its members gather for a rowdy group hug. They slap one another on the back, jump a few times in unison and gulp shots of arak, a popular anise-infused spirit. The nine musicians have overcome crippling injuries and post-traumatic stress to arrive together at a popular Tel Aviv nightclub, where on this night they share billing with Israeli rock legend Ehud Banai. "This band keeps me alive," said 9 Lives vocalist Dekel Darchani, 37, who wears his black hair in a rockabilly pompadour.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Twitter is blowing up today over One Direction's hit “Best Song Ever,” with hundreds of fans posting messages to the hashtag #donttouchbestsongever -- and that's just in the last 10 minutes. The tweets are flooding in since a blogger in England pointed out a similarity between the opening to the 1D hit and the Who's 1971 rock classic “Baba O'Riley” and suggested that somebody in the British government take the group to task for lifting the musical motif. “Someone should call Trading Standards over the song title as 1D sterilise The Who 's 'Baba O'Riley'," the unidentified contributor at ClickMusic.com wrote . PHOTOS: Iconic rock guitars and their owners "At a certain point we recognised it had the same type of intro where there's a synth and a piano,” One Direction producer Julian Bunetta has said, “but we really tried to make sure that there was no intellectual property stolen or anything like that.
HEALTH
December 27, 2013 | By James S. Fell
Your favorite guitar player wishes he could play like Joe Satriani. Those righteous riffs you hear when Metallica is on the radio? Satriani taught that band's Kirk Hammett and many other metal greats, including Steve Vai and Larry LaLonde, to play. I sat down with 57-year-old Satriani the night before he played his Unstoppable Momentum show to discuss the perils of snowboarding for a guitar player. Were you one of those fit kids, or did activity come later? I grew up on Long Island, so it was baseball and football.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Twenty or so years ago, Lou Reed - who died Sunday of liver failure at 71 - published a book called “Beyond Thought and Expression: Selected Lyrics” that casts in stark relief the promise and the pretension of thinking about rock lyrics as poetry. Reed, of course, always considered himself in such terms, tracing a lineage to the story writer and poet Delmore Schwartz , who had been his teacher at Syracuse University, creating with the Velvet Underground (and later, in solo efforts such as “Berlin,” “Street Hassle,” “New York” and “Songs for Drella” )
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1985 | CRAIG LEE
"FLIP YOUR WIG." Husker Du. SST. When this Minneapolis trio released its double album opus, "Zen Arcade" two years ago, many critics felt that this one-time speed-punk band had reached its artistic pinnacle. With the release of the equally titanic "Flip Your Wig," it's obvious that Husker Du has just begun to tap its resources. With two excellent songwriters in guitarist-vocalist Bob Mould and drummer Grant Hart, this is a great band in the making, playing the real rock of the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011 | By Robert Abele
Bad notes, old song in 'Janie Jones' In "Janie Jones," the guitar-slinging pre-teen girl with the long black hair is 15-year-old Abigail Breslin, a little tougher-looking since her "Little Miss Sunshine" debut but sporting the same appealing mixture of pluck and vulnerability. She's not served well by this music-filled road drama, however. Dumped by her ex-groupie single mom (Elisabeth Shue) into the hands of the father she never knew — a fading alcoholic rocker named Ethan (Alessandro Nivola)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1998 | JAMES RICCI
Diners at Cha Cha Cha on Ventura Boulevard in Encino are in for the usual double entrancement tonight. While Caribbean-style food hypnotizes their palates with spice, the soft reggae of Fire & Brimstone, pulsing like a heartbeat through the restaurant's clang and chatter, will set their non-digestive inner places throbbing with well-being.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Aki Takahashi, who made a rare Los Angeles appearance at REDCAT on Sunday night, is an elegant pianist with an incandescent tone and the patience of a saint. When she brings into being an exquisite, weightless chord and allows it to slowly die out, radiant overtones linger amazingly long in the air like an unforgettable supernatural scent. She is -- no surprise -- a friend of meditative, abstract, poetic composers in her native Japan and the world over. But she has her quirks.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010 | By Chris Barton
"Here's another one from my KROQ listening on the way from the airport," Brad Mehldau said with a smirk from the Largo at the Coronet stage on Tuesday night. "Good tune, though," he added before launching into an almost obscenely grand and beautiful cover of Stone Temple Pilots' "Interstate Love Song." Even though Mehldau's way with reinventing rock songs has been well documented, such an introduction wasn't entirely expected at a warm-up show before a tour in support of "Highway Rider," a lush double-album of intricate compositions that floats between the worlds of jazz, classical and pop for one of the most striking jazz releases of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Had Steve Jobs commissioned a song, it would have felt like Daft Punk's "Get Lucky. " Modern but ageless. Sleek, streamlined, memorable and futuristic. "We're up all night to get some, we're up all night for good fun," Pharrell optimistically declares, imagining joy on the horizon. Released in April, the single went on to soundtrack the year's wedding receptions, bar mitzvahs, drives along the Pacific Coast Highway and hairbrush-as-microphone bedroom singalongs, no small feat for two helmeted Frenchmen.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Broadway composer and lyricist Jerry Herman has sold his West Hollywood condo for $3.2 million. The buyer is Danish restaurateur Ole Strecker. The chic double unit, created by combining two condos, contains three bedrooms, five bathrooms and 4,000 square feet of living space. Features of the updated home include a media room, an office, a den and a terrace. The building, constructed in 1962, has concierge service, 24-hour valet parking and a rooftop pool. There are city and mountain views.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Twenty or so years ago, Lou Reed - who died Sunday of liver failure at 71 - published a book called “Beyond Thought and Expression: Selected Lyrics” that casts in stark relief the promise and the pretension of thinking about rock lyrics as poetry. Reed, of course, always considered himself in such terms, tracing a lineage to the story writer and poet Delmore Schwartz , who had been his teacher at Syracuse University, creating with the Velvet Underground (and later, in solo efforts such as “Berlin,” “Street Hassle,” “New York” and “Songs for Drella” )
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
To hear the soothing, spiritual sounds coming from 17-year-old Cameron Griffin's acoustic guitar as he gently plucks its strings leaves a visitor feeling as if he has been transported to a sandy beach at sunset amid cool, refreshing waves. Then, seeing a video of the 6-foot-3, 215-pound Griffin sending a ballcarrier crashing to the ground adds to the intrigue of a teenager who's clearly a savant of sorts. How else to explain someone who took up the guitar seven years ago and taught himself to play by listening to music, then became a football standout only after going out for the team as a freshman at Los Angeles View Park Prep and learning how to play by listening to his coaches.
IMAGE
September 1, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
London-based luxury e-tailer Farfetch.com has a concept that's "why didn't I think of that?" simple: a website that unites the selling power of some of the best independent luxury boutiques from around the globe, including A'Maree's in Newport Beach, Kirna Zabete in New York, L'Eclaireur in Paris and the Henrik Vibskov boutique in Copenhagen. By acting as a kind of global cooperative, such an online hub can offer smaller retailers the kind of high exposure and low shipping costs that were once the sole provenance of the major players in e-commerce and, at the same time, serve up a deep bench of inventory that includes the smaller, emerging designers and hard-to-find pieces that are the heart and soul of a luxury boutique's merchandise mix. José Neves, a Portuguese-born, London-based serial entrepreneur and Farfetch's founder and chief executive, did think of that - back in 2007 while he was selling his Swear footwear brand to retailers that ran the gamut from big-chain department stores and global websites to one-off independents.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Twitter is blowing up today over One Direction's hit “Best Song Ever,” with hundreds of fans posting messages to the hashtag #donttouchbestsongever -- and that's just in the last 10 minutes. The tweets are flooding in since a blogger in England pointed out a similarity between the opening to the 1D hit and the Who's 1971 rock classic “Baba O'Riley” and suggested that somebody in the British government take the group to task for lifting the musical motif. “Someone should call Trading Standards over the song title as 1D sterilise The Who 's 'Baba O'Riley'," the unidentified contributor at ClickMusic.com wrote . PHOTOS: Iconic rock guitars and their owners "At a certain point we recognised it had the same type of intro where there's a synth and a piano,” One Direction producer Julian Bunetta has said, “but we really tried to make sure that there was no intellectual property stolen or anything like that.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1999
I read the article about the making of "The Red Violin" with eagerness that quickly turned to confusion ("Truly Playing the Part," by Ken Smith, June 6). The movie was summarized as "the story . . . unfolds over 300 years and five centuries, tracing a 17th century violin from its creation in Cremona, Italy, through the hands of its players, owners and admirers to a present-day auction house in Montreal." Somewhere, I was looking for a reference and/or credit to "Antonietta" by John Hersey, published by Knopf in 1991, which chronicles the creation of a violin in Cremona, Italy, by the hands of Stradivari, and follows the instrument through the centuries, winding up at an auction house in Martha's Vineyard in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Zeroing in on the art of rehearsal, "Becoming Traviata" is an exquisitely observed look at performance and the creative process. You don't need to be an opera buff to appreciate Philippe Béziat's documentary, which makes the essentials of Verdi's romantic drama "La Traviata" clear while building its own stirring narrative around a French festival production's director and star. Béziat takes in many telling details of the work-in-progress, from the backstage paintbrushes to the crew members working out their scenery cues, but the pulse of his film is the interaction between the director, Jean-Francois Sivadier, and the soprano, Natalie Dessay.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Chicago entrepreneurs Jason Lucash and Mike Szymczak managed to launch a line of audio products during the recession. Their folding cardboard speakers made Time magazine's 2009 list of best inventions. National television exposure on the "Today" show and "Shark Tank" soon followed. Then they did something really surprising. They moved to California. The knock on the Golden State is that costs are too high, regulations too plentiful and the attitude toward business is generally unfriendly.
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