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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"There's no point in starting another art school -- unless it's educationally unique, it's run by practicing artists, it's based on student needs, it re-focuses on fundamentals, it has community support, it has solid financial backing and it has a meaningful name." That's the message on the cover of Grand View, the quarterly bulletin of the Chouinard Foundation, a nonprofit organization in South Pasadena.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2011
Charles Wyly Texas billionaire and philanthropist Charles Wyly, 77, a Texas billionaire and philanthropist whose family donated millions of dollars to Republican causes and Dallas arts projects, died Sunday after a car accident in western Colorado, authorities said. Wyly, who maintained a home near Aspen, Colo., was turning onto a highway near the local airport when his Porsche was hit by a sport utility vehicle, the Colorado State Patrol said in a statement. Wyly died at Aspen Valley Hospital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990
In response to "A Tradition of Tradition-Be-Damned" by David Wharton, April 15: Once again the CalArts story is told without reference to its real roots: the Chouinard Art Institute and the L.A. Music School, the building blocks for Walt Disney's "university of the arts." It began in 1929 when Disney had no money and Madame Chouinard agreed to train his first animators on a pay-later basis. He never forgot and over the years watched the Chouinard Art Institute grow into the finest art school on the West Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of Chaz Bojórquez's fondest childhood memories is of climbing down into the L.A. River basin around Highland Park, running and sliding in 2 inches of water enclosed in a moss-covered tunnel — his "Tom Sawyer swimming pool," as he called it. For many Angelenos the L.A. River is just another concrete surface viewed from their car windows. A waterless paved gorge filled with graffiti, grit and vagrants but also a sentimental symbol of the city's cinematic history that provided a convenient location for movies such as "Terminator 2," "Grease" and "Transformers."
NEWS
September 13, 1997
Dick Lucas, 77, Disney animator for four decades whose work ranged from "Cinderella" to "The Jungle Book." Lucas studied at Los Angeles' former Chouinard Art Institute and was hired by Disney Studios in 1942 with a personal recommendation from Walt Disney. Lucas helped to animate more than a dozen features, including "Three Caballeros," "Peter Pan," "Alice in Wonderland" and "Lady and the Tramp" as well as "Cinderella" and "The Jungle Book."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1993
Elin Jane Waite, an illustrator who taught at several universities and art schools, has died in Palmdale. She was 59. A resident of Studio City, Miss Waite died Jan. 30 of heart failure, said a longtime friend, Leo Monahan. Born in Redondo Beach, she earned a bachelor's degree in art from the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles. From the early 1960s until the early 1970s, she was art director of Westways magazine, illustrating covers for the magazine and other publications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2011
Charles Wyly Texas billionaire and philanthropist Charles Wyly, 77, a Texas billionaire and philanthropist whose family donated millions of dollars to Republican causes and Dallas arts projects, died Sunday after a car accident in western Colorado, authorities said. Wyly, who maintained a home near Aspen, Colo., was turning onto a highway near the local airport when his Porsche was hit by a sport utility vehicle, the Colorado State Patrol said in a statement. Wyly died at Aspen Valley Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Chouinard Art Institute closed its doors 29 years ago, but it refuses to die. Even if the building on Grand View Street, just west of downtown Los Angeles, is now the home of the Korean American New Times Church and the school has long since evolved into CalArts, way out in Valencia, fond memories of the long defunct school pop up in nearly every panel discussion, symposium, lecture and article on L.A.'s art history.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of Chaz Bojórquez's fondest childhood memories is of climbing down into the L.A. River basin around Highland Park, running and sliding in 2 inches of water enclosed in a moss-covered tunnel — his "Tom Sawyer swimming pool," as he called it. For many Angelenos the L.A. River is just another concrete surface viewed from their car windows. A waterless paved gorge filled with graffiti, grit and vagrants but also a sentimental symbol of the city's cinematic history that provided a convenient location for movies such as "Terminator 2," "Grease" and "Transformers."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2001
I read Christopher Knight's article about the plight of art schools with some amusement ("Art for School's Sake," July 8). I was one of those who would have loved the chance to learn technique. Instead, I paid hundreds of dollars a unit at a "Good" (by his definition) art school, where students "are encouraged from the first day to stop thinking of themselves as students and to start thinking of themselves as working artists." In this atmosphere of self-indulgence and self-importance, we "learned" to paint using house paint on butcher paper and other such useless exercises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Otto Heino, the Ojai-based master potter, educator and symbol of the midcentury California studio crafts movement who along with his late wife, Vivika, reformulated a lost-to-the-ages Chinese glaze that made him a multimillionaire, has died. He was 94. Heino died Thursday of acute renal failure at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura, said George Gemmingen, a friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2008 | Leah Ollman, Ollman is a freelance writer.
Millard Sheets was an artist, so it's somewhat ironic to wish that an exhibition dedicated to the man focused a little less on his art. There are a handful of gems among the 40-plus watercolors, oils, drawings and prints on view at the Oceanside Museum of Art, but Sheets' most enduring legacy is not confined to the page or canvas. He was a doer -- an energetic, productive teacher, mentor, catalyst and facilitator who played a formative role in numerous Southern California cultural institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"There's no point in starting another art school -- unless it's educationally unique, it's run by practicing artists, it's based on student needs, it re-focuses on fundamentals, it has community support, it has solid financial backing and it has a meaningful name." That's the message on the cover of Grand View, the quarterly bulletin of the Chouinard Foundation, a nonprofit organization in South Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2001
I read Christopher Knight's article about the plight of art schools with some amusement ("Art for School's Sake," July 8). I was one of those who would have loved the chance to learn technique. Instead, I paid hundreds of dollars a unit at a "Good" (by his definition) art school, where students "are encouraged from the first day to stop thinking of themselves as students and to start thinking of themselves as working artists." In this atmosphere of self-indulgence and self-importance, we "learned" to paint using house paint on butcher paper and other such useless exercises.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Chouinard Art Institute closed its doors 29 years ago, but it refuses to die. Even if the building on Grand View Street, just west of downtown Los Angeles, is now the home of the Korean American New Times Church and the school has long since evolved into CalArts, way out in Valencia, fond memories of the long defunct school pop up in nearly every panel discussion, symposium, lecture and article on L.A.'s art history.
NEWS
September 13, 1997
Dick Lucas, 77, Disney animator for four decades whose work ranged from "Cinderella" to "The Jungle Book." Lucas studied at Los Angeles' former Chouinard Art Institute and was hired by Disney Studios in 1942 with a personal recommendation from Walt Disney. Lucas helped to animate more than a dozen features, including "Three Caballeros," "Peter Pan," "Alice in Wonderland" and "Lady and the Tramp" as well as "Cinderella" and "The Jungle Book."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2008 | Leah Ollman, Ollman is a freelance writer.
Millard Sheets was an artist, so it's somewhat ironic to wish that an exhibition dedicated to the man focused a little less on his art. There are a handful of gems among the 40-plus watercolors, oils, drawings and prints on view at the Oceanside Museum of Art, but Sheets' most enduring legacy is not confined to the page or canvas. He was a doer -- an energetic, productive teacher, mentor, catalyst and facilitator who played a formative role in numerous Southern California cultural institutions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Otto Heino, the Ojai-based master potter, educator and symbol of the midcentury California studio crafts movement who along with his late wife, Vivika, reformulated a lost-to-the-ages Chinese glaze that made him a multimillionaire, has died. He was 94. Heino died Thursday of acute renal failure at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura, said George Gemmingen, a friend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1993
Elin Jane Waite, an illustrator who taught at several universities and art schools, has died in Palmdale. She was 59. A resident of Studio City, Miss Waite died Jan. 30 of heart failure, said a longtime friend, Leo Monahan. Born in Redondo Beach, she earned a bachelor's degree in art from the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles. From the early 1960s until the early 1970s, she was art director of Westways magazine, illustrating covers for the magazine and other publications.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990
In response to "A Tradition of Tradition-Be-Damned" by David Wharton, April 15: Once again the CalArts story is told without reference to its real roots: the Chouinard Art Institute and the L.A. Music School, the building blocks for Walt Disney's "university of the arts." It began in 1929 when Disney had no money and Madame Chouinard agreed to train his first animators on a pay-later basis. He never forgot and over the years watched the Chouinard Art Institute grow into the finest art school on the West Coast.
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