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NEWS
December 9, 2003
My wife, 4-year-old daughter and I were touring Moonridge Zoo in Big Bear, where two rescued mountain lions are in enclosures. The male lion ignored my wife and me but when he saw my red-haired daughter, TJ, he responded as if he'd heard a dinner bell. He paced, stared at her, licked his chops. Obviously, TJ was a desirable item on his menu. I'm no scientist, but it seems that this lion, and by extension all mountain lions, instinctively see vulnerable mammals as walking snacks. Since then, I've stayed close to TJ on hikes in the Santa Monicas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- There's no shortage of offbeat characters in San Francisco who are drawn to City Hall. Willie Brown was harassed by an Elvis impersonator. Gavin Newsom was stalked by a man wearing purple latex gloves. Democratic strategist Nathan Ballard, who spent a decade working in City Hall, said Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow was one of those characters. “I just remember him showing up at events and trying to get pictures with politicians,” Ballard said. The Chinatown gangster was trying to make a name for himself as a legitimate community leader after being released from prison in 2003.
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SPORTS
January 14, 2010 | By Chris Foster
Whether Norm Chow remains at UCLA as the football team's offensive coordinator or bolts across town to rejoin USC will be determined by money. Chow, who is in the final year of a three-year contract, has asked UCLA to extend his contact. The request was made after USC contacted him, according to a UCLA athletics source who requested anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the situation. During an evening conference call with reporters, UCLA Coach Rick Neuheisel said Chow "assured me that he wanted to be at UCLA" earlier in the day. Chow is set to make $640,000 at UCLA next season, which includes a $250,000 bonus if he is the offensive coordinator on the first day of spring practice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
When Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow walked the streets of San Francisco's Chinatown in one of his natty suits, bright pocket square ablaze, he exuded power. Almost from the moment he arrived from Hong Kong in 1976 at the age of 16, he was a force in the local underworld, working as an enforcer for a local fraternal club called the Hop Sing Tong, shaking down gambling dens and running prostitution rings, according to authorities and his own accounts. He once told prosecutors he was in charge of all Asian crime in San Francisco, and admitted that he partnered with a leader in an ancient Chinese criminal group, or Triad.
SPORTS
January 15, 2010 | By Chris Foster and Gary Klein
Offensive coordinator Norm Chow is excited to be at UCLA, repeating that several times during a conference call Thursday to announce he would not be leaving to coach at USC. So after two days of false reports, speculation and maneuvering, Chow and USC transition from "will he?" to "what happens now?" USC Coach Lane Kiffin will continue filling out his staff, after the Trojans failed to get a major piece of their dream team to go with Monte Kiffin and Ed Orgeron. Chow will go back to UCLA, and is expected to receive the contract extension he sought, following a public courting by the school's cross-town rival.
MAGAZINE
March 12, 1995 | RJ Smith, RJ Smith of Los Angeles is a contributing editor to Details magazine.
Some productions begin with a handshake, a conference call, a Bombay martini at Morton's. We might say they have a hundred starts, or no real start at all, for the inaugurating rituals remain private and various from project to project, studio to studio. But in Hong Kong, all films begin alike. They embark almost exactly as "Peace Hotel" did in a windowless production office on a December afternoon. They begin with a roast pig wrapped in cellophane and two dried fish on a table. They begin with a prayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
True to its title, "The Hangover Part III" has left many film critics wishing they'd abstained from the R-rated comedy's destructive misadventures. Those keeping score will recall that the first "Hangover" was an unexpected hit in 2009, while the Bangkok-set second installment was derided as a tired retread. "Part III" tweaks the premise of its predecessors: This time, the trio played by Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis don't black out during a drug-fueled pre-wedding mishap, but rather are forced by a gangster to commit their infamous hijinks.
FOOD
December 7, 1995
Though Michelle Huneven's piece on little cookbooks ("Small Packages," Nov. 30) came off a little sour-sounding, I tend to agree that these are not particularly useful books--usually on the gimmicky side and tremendously overpriced. Although English cookbooks need a lot of explanation and translation for American cooks who haven't been there, I was surprised that she was puzzled by some of the terms. I'm not British, but having traveled there (and to France), I do know that: Caster sugar is granulated sugar--specifically what we call dessert or superfine sugar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- There's no shortage of offbeat characters in San Francisco who are drawn to City Hall. Willie Brown was harassed by an Elvis impersonator. Gavin Newsom was stalked by a man wearing purple latex gloves. Democratic strategist Nathan Ballard, who spent a decade working in City Hall, said Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow was one of those characters. “I just remember him showing up at events and trying to get pictures with politicians,” Ballard said. The Chinatown gangster was trying to make a name for himself as a legitimate community leader after being released from prison in 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1989
I wish to publicly express my sincere thanks to the editors of the Los Angeles Times for printing my letter ("To 'Loving Owner' " May 21) regarding the abandoned chow-like dog on Otay Lakes Road. I have been able to learn that the dog is well and has found a loving owner. I want to share the story with you. I received a call from Kevin, who lives less than a mile from me--he had successfully enticed "Red" into his car. This was accomplished with pizza and tender words of encouragement and patience.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Former MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch suggested during a REDCAT panel discussion Tuesday night that a new art star has been belatedly born: Michael Chow, who studied painting and architecture and acted in films as a young man in London before launching his first Mr. Chow restaurant there in 1968. A short film shown before the discussion documented Chow's return to painting over the past two years. It depicted the 74-year-old restaurateur flinging paint, milk and melted metal onto canvases, mashing them with egg yolks, sticking on sponges and other materials, and coming up with something reminiscent of classic Jackson Pollock.
SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | By Gary Klein
As USC prepares for Saturday's first training camp practice, the Trojans appear to have caught a break in regard to their Aug. 29 opener at Hawaii. Hawaii Coach Norm Chow said Friday that offensive coordinator Aaron Price had been dismissed from the program. The Associated Press reported that Chow said "some issues have arisen," but Chow did not elaborate on the specifics of Price's departure. Chow, USC's offensive coordinator from 2001-04, hired Price in February to help a team that ranked 118th among 120 major college teams in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
True to its title, "The Hangover Part III" has left many film critics wishing they'd abstained from the R-rated comedy's destructive misadventures. Those keeping score will recall that the first "Hangover" was an unexpected hit in 2009, while the Bangkok-set second installment was derided as a tired retread. "Part III" tweaks the premise of its predecessors: This time, the trio played by Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis don't black out during a drug-fueled pre-wedding mishap, but rather are forced by a gangster to commit their infamous hijinks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Who let the dogs out? In 2009 the Baha Men's lyrics felt caustic, clever, comical and slightly subversive, perfect for the debauched Las Vegas bachelor party that was about to unfold. Phil, Stu and Alan - a.k.a. the Wolfpack, played by Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis - were about to begin their politically incorrect, impossibly irreverent and consistently perverse struggle to reconstruct the night and figure out where they lost the groom. Side-splittingly hilarious, it used a heady blend of Mike Tyson, a Bengal tiger, a hooker, a baby, a chicken and a crazed, screaming and sometimes naked Mr. Chow to incredible comic effect.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Competitive eaters will don their bibs and face off Saturday in Las Vegas in a hot dog-eating contest at New York-New York . The competition, which will take place on the resort's Brooklyn Bridge, is a preliminary round for the international championship, which will be July 4 in New York City. The pigout gets underway at 1 p.m. as hotel employees compete for bragging rights. At 2:30, local first responders and military personnel will go head-to-head in a chow-down for charity.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
At Nowness.com , take a look at the quirky short entitled " Mr. Chow: Preparations " by German filmmaker Norbert Schoerner. A model gets dressed in a hotel room while watching a video of a Chinese chef making hand-pulled noodles at Mr. Chow in London. The noodle-maker's movements are mesmerizing -- and somehow comforting. As he tosses and pulls his rope of dough, slapping it on the counter or sweeping it through flour, the strands multiply and multiply. A real magic show.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1998
The borrowed interest in what passes for today's "innovative" television commercials is neither sophisticated nor insidious ("Where's the Pitch?" by Paul Brownfield, May 3). It's simply inept. As media costs escalate and network audiences diminish, it is just short of criminal for advertising's new breed of self-indulgent creatives to spend millions attempting to "entertain" us at the expense of informing us. How must the stockholders of Pepsico USA feel at having their Taco Bell brand irresponsibly positioned as dog food?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1987 | Lonn Johnston
Allen Kujak, a burly former Chicago ironworker, held the shivering miniature poodle lovingly in his left arm as he clipped the 7-year-old's toenails. "Buttons likes to nibble, huh, Buttons?" Kujak cooed, nuzzling the pet with his mustache. Then Buttons snapped, sinking fine teeth into Kujak's thick finger. "Ow! Damn!" Kujak yelped, spinning from the grooming table.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist
The "Downton Abbey" cast took to the red carpet at the 19th Screen Actors Guild Awards. Among those present were Amy Nutall, Phyllis Logan, Sophie McShera and Allen Leech. As stunned as cast members are with the show's runaway success in the U.S., they explained Sunday night that what they were most excited for was, well, dinner. "A good dinner! We're all a bit hungry and the food here in the States is amazing!" said an enthusiastic Logan, who plays the matriarchal Mrs. Hughes on the British series.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Jay Jones
On Dec. 9, Las Vegas residents and visitors will have a one-of-a-kind opportunity to sample the wares of various top-tier chefs and help the victims of Superstorm Sandy. A culinary extravaganza called "Start Spreadin' the News" will  be held on the Brooklyn Bridge at the New York-New York Hotel & Casino from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on that Sunday. Admission ($100 per person) will include tastings from a variety of celebrity chefs. There will also be wine, craft beer and specialty cocktails provided by Southern Wine & Spirits of Nevada, the event's host.
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