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Chris Christie

NATIONAL
January 16, 2014 | By Joseph Tanfani and Alana Semuels
TRENTON, N.J. - A new investigative committee issued subpoenas Thursday for 17 individuals and 3 organizations as it launched a deeper look into the involvement of Gov. Chris Christie's administration in ordering closures that caused a massive September traffic jam on roads leading to the George Washington Bridge. The names on the list weren't immediately released, but they were expected to include Bridget Kelly, Christie's former deputy chief of staff, who weeks before the closures sent an email to a close ally of the governor on the Port Authority, the regional agency that controls the bridge.
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NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Joe Tanfani
TRENTON, N.J. -- A new investigative committee was preparing subpoenas Thursday for 17 individuals and three organizations as it launched a deeper look into how many employees or appointees of Gov. Chris Christie were involved in ordering lane closures that caused a massive September traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge. The names on the list weren't immediately released, but they were expected to include Bridget Kelly, Christie's former deputy chief of staff, who weeks before the closures sent an email to a close ally of the governor on the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the regional agency that controls the bridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
How dire has the Fort Lee, N.J., traffic jam scandal known as "BridgeGate" gotten for Gov. Chris Christie? So bad that even Jersey's golden child, Bruce Springsteen, is mocking it. Springsteen appeared on "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon" on Tuesday to sing a parody of his anthemic hit "Born to Run" alongside Fallon. The new song, "Gov. Christie Traffic Jam," took dead aim at the governor's current headache. Fallon appeared first, dressed in his best early '80s "Born in the U.S.A.
OPINION
January 14, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
What a bizarre spectacle. Assuming he did not lie during his marathon news conference last week, the feeding frenzy surrounding New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will be remembered as one of those incredibly odd moments of elite journalistic hysteria that are difficult to explain to people who weren't there or didn't get it. I'm not referring to the scandal itself; that's easy enough to understand. What Christie's team did was outrageous and deserves as much foofaraw and brouhaha as the New Jersey media can muster.
NEWS
January 14, 2014 | By Joseph Tanfani
TRENTON, N.J. -- Admitting mistakes even as he laid out ambitious plans to improve schools and reform criminal justice, Gov. Chris Christie tried to restart his political agenda Tuesday in the middle of the swirling scandal over the George Washington Bridge. The Republican governor opened his annual State of the State speech by repeating his apology for his aides' role in ordering closed several access lanes leading to the bridge. The move last September snarled traffic for four days in Fort Lee, where the Democratic mayor had failed to endorse Christie's November reelection.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2014 | By Joseph Tanfani and Alana Semuels
TRENTON, N.J. - For Gov. Chris Christie, the questions about the traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge are just beginning, as New Jersey Democrats announced a new investigative committee that would push to figure out who ordered the four-day traffic snarl, and why. Democratic leaders in the state Assembly said the committee would begin with the bridge closure and possibly expand to look into other allegations of political retribution by...
OPINION
January 13, 2014 | By Barbara Garson
If Chris Christie's insistence that he didn't order his aides to snarl traffic on the George Washington Bridge sounds familiar, it should. Think Shakespeare. More specifically, think "Richard II. " Reading the emails sent by Christie's aides and appointees, I couldn't help but think about the scene in which Sir Pierce of Exton has a conversation with an unnamed servant. They've both heard King Henry IV express what sounds like a wish to have the imprisoned former king, Richard, executed.
NEWS
January 12, 2014 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- A growing number of Republican and some Democratic leaders said Sunday that, for now, they are accepting at face value New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's word that he knew nothing about the George Washington Bridge traffic-jam scheme that has rocked his political career. Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani said he found it “pretty darn credible” that Christie was unaware that his aides shut down lanes to the bridge in September in what was apparently an act of political retribution.
OPINION
January 11, 2014
Re "Emails link Christie aide to scandal," Jan. 8 New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie denies direct responsibility for the retaliatory traffic jam in Fort Lee, whose mayor refused to endorse the governor for reelection. Christie may say the traffic tie-up was the action of rogue staff, but he must accept responsibility for presiding over a moral swamp in which such a vicious scheme would even be considered. The GOP's dirty tricks go back to Richard Nixon. The catalog of uncivil Republican actions demonstrates a lack of consideration for the interests of the American people: holding up important nominations, shutting down the government, threatening to default on the debt and doing everything possible to undermine healthcare reform (and having the chutzpah to complain about its implementation)
NATIONAL
January 11, 2014 | By Joseph Tanfani
HADDONFIELD, N.J. - A four-day traffic hell that trapped cars headed to one of the nation's busiest bridges, supposedly engineered by gleeful political operatives as payback: Deeply stupid, for sure. Unbelievably vindictive and petty. And, in its way, so quintessentially New Jersey. The George Washington Bridge scandal that has engulfed Gov. Chris Christie, bizarre as it is, also somehow stands as an example of the state's hardball political traditions. In the Garden State, political bosses have never gone out of style, corruption cases pile up more victims than the Sopranos, and elbow-to-the-face tactics are shrugged off by voters - as much a part of Jersey culture as boardwalk custard and stainless-steel diners.
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