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Chris Farley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1997
It was with great sadness that I learned of the untimely death of comedian Chris Farley (Dec. 19). I know the media will be playing up images of a wild and uncontrollable man--images that will unfortunately stick with most of the public. However, the fondest image I will ever have of Farley is seeing him at Mass at Saint Monica's Catholic Church in Santa Monica, reverently genuflecting and making the sign of the cross as he left Mass. I think Farley will truly rest in peace. DONALD A. BENTLEY La Puente
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2014 | By Claire Zulkey
Even though he's been nominated twice now for Academy Awards, it's still a little hard to stop thinking of Jonah Hill as that roly-poly comedic acolyte of Judd Apatow (specifically, as this guy. ) Perhaps it's time to admit he's a real actor in addition to a comic presence. Both sides of Hill were on display Saturday night when he hosted “SNL” for the third time. Some sketches were as broad and loud and demeaning as could possibly be. In one scene, he played a man forced to admit he clogged a toilet on a game show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2005 | From City News Service
Comedian Chris Farley posthumously received the 2,289th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Friday, four days before the release of the "Tommy Boy Holy Schnike Edition" DVD. Farley's "Saturday Night Live" cast mates Chris Rock and David Spade joined members of Farley's family at the ceremony in front of the Improv Olympic West, where Farley performed. "I think it's sweet that everyone still has a real nice place in their hearts for him, they still remember him," Spade said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
In Laugh Factory owner Jamie Masada's perfect world, each of his stand-up comics would kill it onstage at the Hollywood comedy club ? then they'd head upstairs and retreat into the club's inner sanctum, a small, wood-paneled private office on the top floor. There, he or she would lie back on a plush, red couch and partake in an often pricey indulgence that can bring on feelings of calm, release and euphoria. Debauchery of choice? Psychotherapy. On Monday, Masada will be starting an in-house therapy program for Laugh Factory comics ?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2006 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Eight years after his drug-related death at age 33, Chris Farley will be making a reappearance in L.A. The family of the oversized comic has approved the first major commercial use of his image -- on a series of Los Angeles-area billboards advertising a new treatment for drug and alcohol addiction.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY and STEVE BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Chris Farley, the wild, 300-pound comic actor who gained recognition for his physical antics on "Saturday Night Live" as well as such movies as "Tommy Boy" and "Black Sheep," was found dead Thursday in his Chicago apartment. He was 33. The cause of death was not immediately known, but a Police Department source said Farley's death appeared to be from natural causes, and a Cook County medical examiner on the scene said, "There's nothing to indicate otherwise at this time."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2008 | Matthew DeBord, Special to The Times
Chris Farley's comedy was often a bit terrifying. He could tap into his cyclonic inner life and discover characters whose exaggerated everyday weaknesses induced a sense of squirming self-recognition. Farley was the heir apparent to his fellow "Saturday Night Live" alumnus John Belushi, and the symmetry of the two men's untimely deaths, both at age 33, has forever linked them.
OPINION
April 6, 2006 | PATT MORRISON
A PRETTY ODD coincidence, if you ask me -- 400 miles apart, in L.A. and San Francisco, two billboards suddenly show up in very prominent places, both of them about famous boys supposedly behaving badly. "Trade Barry!" blared the billboard outside Giants Park, or AT&T Park, or SBC Park, or whatever it's called this week. And on the Sunset Strip, there's dead comedian Chris Farley, his face looking as big as a hot-air balloon, and the phrase "It wasn't all his fault."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2008 | Joshua Sandoval, Times Staff Writer
In 2004, the E! network counted down the 101 most unforgettable "Saturday Night Live" moments. Chris Farley was the only person to be featured in the top 10 more than once. No. 9 on the list was the infamous Chippendales sketch in which Farley is dancing bare-bellied next to the bare-chested Patrick Swayze. That put Farley on the map in only his fourth "SNL" show. No. 4 on the list was memorable for a foreboding moment in Phil Hartman's final "SNL" show in May 1994. In the closing scene, Hartman is holding Farley while singing goodbye.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1997 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chris Farley is as subtle as a boulder rolling downhill, as sophisticated as a plate of fries with a side order of more fries. This huge sputtering mass of insecurity leavened by huge good humor has turned out to be a favorite of kids, a group not known for its refined aesthetic. They've helped make the modest "Beverly Hills Ninja" a surprising comedy hit. Why? Youngsters at a recent screening had a ready answer--Farley is a lot like them, only bigger. He's funny, like a kid.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2008 | Matthew DeBord, Special to The Times
Chris Farley's comedy was often a bit terrifying. He could tap into his cyclonic inner life and discover characters whose exaggerated everyday weaknesses induced a sense of squirming self-recognition. Farley was the heir apparent to his fellow "Saturday Night Live" alumnus John Belushi, and the symmetry of the two men's untimely deaths, both at age 33, has forever linked them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2008 | Joshua Sandoval, Times Staff Writer
In 2004, the E! network counted down the 101 most unforgettable "Saturday Night Live" moments. Chris Farley was the only person to be featured in the top 10 more than once. No. 9 on the list was the infamous Chippendales sketch in which Farley is dancing bare-bellied next to the bare-chested Patrick Swayze. That put Farley on the map in only his fourth "SNL" show. No. 4 on the list was memorable for a foreboding moment in Phil Hartman's final "SNL" show in May 1994. In the closing scene, Hartman is holding Farley while singing goodbye.
OPINION
April 6, 2006 | PATT MORRISON
A PRETTY ODD coincidence, if you ask me -- 400 miles apart, in L.A. and San Francisco, two billboards suddenly show up in very prominent places, both of them about famous boys supposedly behaving badly. "Trade Barry!" blared the billboard outside Giants Park, or AT&T Park, or SBC Park, or whatever it's called this week. And on the Sunset Strip, there's dead comedian Chris Farley, his face looking as big as a hot-air balloon, and the phrase "It wasn't all his fault."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2006 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Eight years after his drug-related death at age 33, Chris Farley will be making a reappearance in L.A. The family of the oversized comic has approved the first major commercial use of his image -- on a series of Los Angeles-area billboards advertising a new treatment for drug and alcohol addiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2005 | From City News Service
Comedian Chris Farley posthumously received the 2,289th star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Friday, four days before the release of the "Tommy Boy Holy Schnike Edition" DVD. Farley's "Saturday Night Live" cast mates Chris Rock and David Spade joined members of Farley's family at the ceremony in front of the Improv Olympic West, where Farley performed. "I think it's sweet that everyone still has a real nice place in their hearts for him, they still remember him," Spade said.
SPORTS
April 15, 2002 | Houston Mitchell
You just never know where those camera shots of NBA fans dancing in the aisles can lead. Would you believe an all-male dance team at Dallas Maverick games? No, not those kind of male dancers, ladies. The Dallas Morning News described them as "Clydesdales, not Chippendales." The Mavericks' ManiAACs (American Airlines Center) are scheduled to shake their stuff--and perhaps the floor--at Dallas' first home playoff game. A full-body photo was required with all applications on the Maverick Web site.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1997 | MICHAEL COLTON, THE WASHINGTON POST
Fat comedians have an edge. Laughing at someone who's less perfect than ourselves is one of the most basic forms of humor, so plump guys--John Belushi, Jackie Gleason, John Candy, Homer Simpson--seem naturally funny to begin with. Chris Farley knew this, and made a career out of his flab. His willingness to make fun of himself--and his ability to earn our sympathy--made him a success in film and television, even if he never earned the respect of critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1998
Comedian Chris Farley died of an accidental overdose of cocaine and morphine, the medical examiner announced Friday. A narrowing of the arteries supplying the heart muscle was a significant contributing factor in his death, Cook County Medical Examiner Dr. Edmund Donoghue said in a statement. Farley's brother found the body of the 33-year-old "Saturday Night Live" and movie comic Dec. 18 on the floor of his apartment in the posh John Hancock Building.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1998 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Almost Heroes," two fools (Matthew Perry and the late Chris Farley) lead a motley crew of 19th century losers across the country, trying to beat Lewis and Clark to the Pacific. Rated PG-13 * It may not be Chris Farley's best movie, but young fans who paid to see him in his final starring role were not disappointed. The comic was as big, loud, manic and gross as ever. "It was classic Chris Farley.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1998 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Christopher Guest demonstrated last year, with "Waiting for Guffman," that he couldn't direct traffic. But that was OK, because he surrounded himself with some smart comedians well-versed in the art of improvisation--Eugene Levy, Catherine O'Hara, Fred Willard and Guest himself. With that troupe in front of the camera, behind-the-camera technique hardly mattered.
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