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June 18, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
Director Roland Joffe's riveting 1984 re-creation of the Cambodian War and its genocidal aftermath was shot by Chris Menges in a style of scalding immediacy. It stars Sam Waterston (pictured) as New York Times reporter Sidney Schanberg and the Oscar-winning Dr. Hanig S. Ngor as the friend he had to leave behind in hell (A&E Saturday at 5 and 9 p.m.).
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NEWS
February 25, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Pete Hamill's Reader's Digest story "The Yellow Handkerchief" inspired Yoji Yamada's appealing 1977 film of the same name, and now it has become the basis for a new movie, also of the same name but not really a remake. Screenplay writer Erin Dignam and director Udayan Prasad have taken the plot outline of the Yamada film and created original characters in a rural post-Katrina Louisiana, captured in evocative images by master cinematographer Chris Menges. This "Yellow Handkerchief" is a gentle, low-key road movie, centering on the eternal need to love and to trust, suffused in the humanist spirit that has won its veteran producer, Arthur Cohn, three Oscars.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1985 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Voting in the 19th annual awards of the National Society of Film Critics, meeting Wednesday at the Algonquin Hotel, was the most wide-ranging yet from this eclectic body. Not only was there no single, clear-cut winner, but no one film even repeated once in the nine top awards of the society's categories. The winners came from the widest possible spectrum of this year's releases, from tiny-budget independent American films to big studio productions.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
Director Roland Joffe's riveting 1984 re-creation of the Cambodian War and its genocidal aftermath was shot by Chris Menges in a style of scalding immediacy. It stars Sam Waterston (pictured) as New York Times reporter Sidney Schanberg and the Oscar-winning Dr. Hanig S. Ngor as the friend he had to leave behind in hell (A&E Saturday at 5 and 9 p.m.).
NEWS
February 25, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Pete Hamill's Reader's Digest story "The Yellow Handkerchief" inspired Yoji Yamada's appealing 1977 film of the same name, and now it has become the basis for a new movie, also of the same name but not really a remake. Screenplay writer Erin Dignam and director Udayan Prasad have taken the plot outline of the Yamada film and created original characters in a rural post-Katrina Louisiana, captured in evocative images by master cinematographer Chris Menges. This "Yellow Handkerchief" is a gentle, low-key road movie, centering on the eternal need to love and to trust, suffused in the humanist spirit that has won its veteran producer, Arthur Cohn, three Oscars.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"The Killing Fields" won British cinematographer Chris Menges a 1984 Oscar, and now he's been nominated again for his work on "The Mission," his second collaboration with director Roland Joffe. "I promise I'll come this time," Menges said over lunch in Hollywood the other day. He'd been kept away from the 1985 Academy Awards by the press of family responsibilities--he's the father of five children whose ages range from 9 to 22.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON and Note: "Gothic" has been withdrawn by its producers in Great Britain. All AFI Film Festival of Los Angeles events will take place at the Los Feliz Theater, 1822 N. Vermont Ave., Hollywood, unless otherwise noted. Tickets are available at Ticketron, Teletron and at the box office one hour before showtime. Information: (213) 520-2000 , 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and
"Fatherland" (Great Britain, 1986, 7:30 p.m.). Directed by Ken Loach, with photography by Chris Menges, the marvelously well-acted "Fatherland" traces the odyssey of an East Berlin singer of protest songs who moves to the West. Part political thriller, part razor-keen depiction of high-life in the record business in today's divided Berlin, the film moves from Germany to England as its hero searches for his father, a political emigre from Berlin 30 years before him.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Crisscross" (citywide), set in 1969 during the days around the Apollo moon launch, captures something about that controversial decade almost perfectly. It's a mixed achievement: a small, movingly done human story swallowed up in a more conventional crime thriller. Yet, if it fails, it doesn't fail ignobly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1987
THE WINNERS MOTION PICTURE 'Platoon' DIRECTOR Oliver Stone 'Platoon' ACTRESS Marlee Matlin 'Children of a Lesser God' ACTOR Paul Newman 'The Color of Money' SUPPORTING ACTRESS Dianne Wiest 'Hannah and Her Sisters' SUPPORTING ACTOR Michael Caine 'Hannah and Her Sisters' SCREENPLAY--Original Woody Allen 'Hannah and Her Sisters' SCREENPLAY--Adaptation Ruth Prawer Jhabvala 'A Room With a View' ART DIRECTION Gianni Quaranta, Brian Ackland-Snow, Brian Savegar and Elio Altramura 'A Room With a View'
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"The Killing Fields" won British cinematographer Chris Menges a 1984 Oscar, and now he's been nominated again for his work on "The Mission," his second collaboration with director Roland Joffe. "I promise I'll come this time," Menges said over lunch in Hollywood the other day. He'd been kept away from the 1985 Academy Awards by the press of family responsibilities--he's the father of five children whose ages range from 9 to 22.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1985 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Voting in the 19th annual awards of the National Society of Film Critics, meeting Wednesday at the Algonquin Hotel, was the most wide-ranging yet from this eclectic body. Not only was there no single, clear-cut winner, but no one film even repeated once in the nine top awards of the society's categories. The winners came from the widest possible spectrum of this year's releases, from tiny-budget independent American films to big studio productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Second Best" is such a splendid, intimate film you worry that it's going to get lost in the thicket of much bigger, far more highly publicized fall releases. The irony is that for all its modesty of scale it has the universal appeal of a richly realized father-and-son relationship, portrayed by William Hurt, in one of the finest performances of his career, and by a remarkable newcomer, neophyte actor Chris Cleary Miles.
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