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Chris Pine

ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
In her early 20s, Elizabeth Banks filmed a commercial for the clear malt liquor Zima in which she played three different possible dates: a preppy girl, a tomboy and - once the booze started flowing - a fantasy vixen in a latex nurse's costume. Now 38, Banks has outlasted the adult beverage (it was discontinued in 2008), but the booze ad foreshadowed an acting career filled with eclectic, gung-ho characters - and she's more in demand than ever. Just consider her roles in three studio movies in the last four months: In the dystopian blockbuster "The Hunger Games,"Banks cheerfully chaperones child gladiators into the ring; in the pregnancy comedy "What to Expect When You're Expecting," she crusades for breastfeeding as the manic proprietor of a maternity boutique; and in the family drama"People Like Us," which opened over the weekend, she's a single mom navigating her father's secret history with wit and resilience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Chris Pine of "Star Trek Into Darkness" pleaded guilty Monday to driving drunk in New Zealand.  The actor, who had been charged following an arrest at a sobriety checkpoint after leaving a Feb. 28 wrap party for his film "Z for Zachariah," appeared in Ashburton District Court for a hearing Monday. The "Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit" star was fined $79 ($93 in New Zealand) and had his New Zealand driver's license suspended for six months, according to the Associated Press. The 33-year-old Angeleno reportedly stood silently with his hands behind his back during the hearing and his attorney entered his plea.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Chris Lee
Chris Pine was well aware of his action-hero options. Accepting the lead role in "Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit" - the $60-million thriller that hits theaters Friday - the actor became the fourth man to portray novelist Tom Clancy's iconic CIA super-spy character over the course of a five-film franchise that has spanned nearly a quarter of a century and generated more than $787 million at the box office. As such, Pine's performance could have paid implicit homage to those who came before him. He might have channeled the brisk efficiency of Alec Baldwin's submarine-bound Ryan in "The Hunt for Red October," Harrison Ford's reluctant (and frequently grimacing)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2007 | From Times wire reports
The bridge of the starship Enterprise is filling up. Chris Pine, who had been in talks to join the cast of J.J. Abrams' "Star Trek" flick, will play the young James Kirk, while Karl Urban will take on the role of Dr. Leonard McCoy, Paramount says. They join previously announced cast members Zachary Quinto as Vulcan scientist Spock, Simon Pegg as engineer Scotty, John Cho as helmsman Sulu, Zoe Saldana as communications officer Uhura and Anton Yelchin as navigator Chekov.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rosario Dawson has remarkable diction for someone who talks so quickly ? and, as she readily points out, someone who never formally trained in acting, a point that has shadowed her for more than a decade. "It's been the past couple of years that I thought I could say that I'm an actor," says Dawson in rapid-fire speech. She was discovered on her Manhattan stoop as a teen and cast in 1995's "Kids," but with that stroke of fortune came a haunting insecurity. "I was waiting for that Apollo [Theatre]
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It's a hit-and-miss affair as CIA agents/BFFs Chris Pine and Tom Hardy launch highly targeted competing covert love-ops in "This Means War," both aiming for the heart of a consumer products tester played by Reese Witherspoon. Smart, blond, beautiful but unable to get a guy, Witherspoon's Lauren Scott is as perky and perfect as she seems, but this lovely is not what gives the movie its kick. So if you are in the mood for action, there is a whole lot of it here. If you're in the mood for love, of the swooning, weak-in-the knees sort, there's not so much.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
Wearing a trucker hat, battered blue jeans and an air of breezy confidence, Chris Pine walked through the Paramount Pictures studio lot like he owned the place but felt no particular need to show anyone the deed in his pocket. It's precisely that mix of fighter-pilot cockiness and surfer-dude Zen that you would expect from an actor who, as the leading man in "Star Trek," has taken on the biggest challenge of any popcorn-movie star this summer: How to play James T.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
"It's not my war," says Shia LaBeouf's Sam in "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen." "I fear it soon will be," replies the heavy-hearted towering steel of Optimus Prime. And we know, in that moment, that despite his wish to be just an ordinary guy, Sam will become the reluctant warrior. For us, sacrifices will be made. The world will be made safe. We will be saved. And that is one reason why I love summer so. Sci-fi and super-charged heroes once again rule.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
It's time to brush up on your pop culture references and talk about "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World. " The genre-breaking cult hit is being released on DVD and Blu-ray. In case you're so behind on your pop culture news, a breakdown: The film, based on a graphic novel series, follows a young man's quest to fend off the seven evil exes of his lady love. Yes, lanky Michael Cera is capable of kicking some rogue butt (we're just as surprised). Oh, and there's an 8-bit Nintendo-style Universal Studios ride opening ?
NEWS
May 10, 2007
A good-looking man finds his witty, smart Ms. Right, but friends and colleagues are appalled. The reason? She's overweight. Very overweight. Making its West Coast premiere, Neil LaBute's provocative comedy "Fat Pig" explores the ramifications of a romance that goes against the societal grain, as bias sparks a crisis of conscience and morality. Jo Bonney, who directed the 2004 world premiere production in New York, is staging the show.
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