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Chris Pook

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SPORTS
April 13, 1989 | MIKE KUPPER, Times Assistant Sports Editor
There has been car racing through the streets of Long Beach for a weekend a year since 1975, so this weekend's activities in connection with Sunday's Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach are not likely to catch a significant segment of the community by surprise. Nor, according to promoter Chris Pook, is the race a major bone of contention for Long Beach residents and businessmen, if ever it was, even though it is noisy, crowded, and does mess up downtown traffic, at least somewhat, for the better part of a week.
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SPORTS
June 17, 2003 | Shav Glick, Times Staff Writer
Beleaguered Championship Auto Racing Teams Inc., better known as CART, has hung out the "For Sale" sign. The investment banking firm of Bear Stearns & Company Inc. has been retained to "assist us in exploring strategic alternatives that may be available to CART, including a possible sale of the company," according to Thomas L. Carter, chief financial officer.
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SPORTS
April 1, 1998 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1967, a 26-year-old Englishman named Christopher Robin Pook settled in Long Beach and opened the American Aviation Travel Services. Across a lagoon from his office, a view of the majestic Queen Mary, once the pride of Britain's Cunard Line, kept him from feeling homesick. What concerned him, however, was Long Beach's image as Iowa West.
SPORTS
April 9, 2002 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can Chris Pook, who performed one miracle in racing more than 25 years ago, perform another this year? Pook's announcement last December that he could turn around the moribund Championship Auto Racing Teams, Inc., was met with as much skepticism as his 1975 announcement that he was planning to run a Formula One race down Ocean Boulevard in Long Beach. The fortunes of CART, once the premier open-wheel racing organization in the country, changed dramatically last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1992
If ever we were looking for evidence of California's anti-business climate we have the perfect example in promoter Chris Pook's proposed San Diego Grand Prix and the San Diego Unified Port District's opposition to it. Pook wants to bring a sports car race to downtown San Diego in August of 1993. He has asked for nothing. No money, security, street closings, or street improvements to put on this event. He's paying for all of it. The only thing he has asked for is approval of his plan.
SPORTS
April 15, 1999 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This event is as much Toyota's as it is the city of Long Beach's. --Chris Pook, founder, Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach. * Twenty-five years ago, Toyota was ready to introduce the second-generation Celica in the U.S. When word got out that Chris Pook was going to try putting on a car race through the streets of Long Beach, it piqued the interest of John Cabe, a young man running the parts department for his father's Toyota dealership.
SPORTS
June 17, 2003 | Shav Glick, Times Staff Writer
Beleaguered Championship Auto Racing Teams Inc., better known as CART, has hung out the "For Sale" sign. The investment banking firm of Bear Stearns & Company Inc. has been retained to "assist us in exploring strategic alternatives that may be available to CART, including a possible sale of the company," according to Thomas L. Carter, chief financial officer.
SPORTS
April 24, 1990 | Jim Murray
I've finally figured out what they're going to put on my epitaph. Are you ready for this? "He Led the Long Beach Grand Prix for a Lap and a Half." You heard me. I was in front of the pole sitter and all 25 drivers in that sucker. I had an Unser, an Andretti, Fittipaldi eating my dust. I had Johnny Rutherford shaking his fist at me. Lots of guys have led the Long Beach Grand Prix at the start. But how many of them did it riding backward?
SPORTS
April 1, 1998 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach is the most famous and successful street-course motor race in North America and, in attendance and recognition, is second only to the Indianapolis 500 in importance in Indy car-style racing. More than 125,000 people are expected for Sunday's 105-lap race around the 1.59-mile course through the seaside streets of Long Beach.
SPORTS
April 3, 1985 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
Mario Andretti won three U.S. driving championships before moving to the world Grand Prix circuit and winning the Formula One title. Emerson Fittipaldi of Brazil would like to reverse that process. He has won two world championships and this year plans to race full-time for the CART Indy car crown. "I am fortunate to be driving with one of the strongest teams for my first full season in Indy car racing," said Fittipaldi, who drove in nine races last year for several teams.
SPORTS
April 15, 1999 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This event is as much Toyota's as it is the city of Long Beach's. --Chris Pook, founder, Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach. * Twenty-five years ago, Toyota was ready to introduce the second-generation Celica in the U.S. When word got out that Chris Pook was going to try putting on a car race through the streets of Long Beach, it piqued the interest of John Cabe, a young man running the parts department for his father's Toyota dealership.
SPORTS
April 1, 1998 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach is the most famous and successful street-course motor race in North America and, in attendance and recognition, is second only to the Indianapolis 500 in importance in Indy car-style racing. More than 125,000 people are expected for Sunday's 105-lap race around the 1.59-mile course through the seaside streets of Long Beach.
SPORTS
April 1, 1998 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1967, a 26-year-old Englishman named Christopher Robin Pook settled in Long Beach and opened the American Aviation Travel Services. Across a lagoon from his office, a view of the majestic Queen Mary, once the pride of Britain's Cunard Line, kept him from feeling homesick. What concerned him, however, was Long Beach's image as Iowa West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1992
If ever we were looking for evidence of California's anti-business climate we have the perfect example in promoter Chris Pook's proposed San Diego Grand Prix and the San Diego Unified Port District's opposition to it. Pook wants to bring a sports car race to downtown San Diego in August of 1993. He has asked for nothing. No money, security, street closings, or street improvements to put on this event. He's paying for all of it. The only thing he has asked for is approval of his plan.
SPORTS
July 8, 1992 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chris Pook was in San Diego Thursday for the announcement that the Von's grocery store chain was going to be the next sponsor of the Grand Prix of San Diego. But of even more local impact was confirmation that Pook's Del Mar Race Management team is seeking to move the increasingly popular event from its site on the Del Mar Fairgrounds to a downtown location that would feature the San Diego Convention Center as its centerpiece. Pook has proposed a 10-turn, 1.
SPORTS
April 24, 1990 | Jim Murray
I've finally figured out what they're going to put on my epitaph. Are you ready for this? "He Led the Long Beach Grand Prix for a Lap and a Half." You heard me. I was in front of the pole sitter and all 25 drivers in that sucker. I had an Unser, an Andretti, Fittipaldi eating my dust. I had Johnny Rutherford shaking his fist at me. Lots of guys have led the Long Beach Grand Prix at the start. But how many of them did it riding backward?
SPORTS
April 22, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mario Andretti was in Long Beach in 1975 when Chris Pook revolutionized motor racing by promoting the first modern-era temporary-circuit street race in the United States. Andretti, as usual, was the fastest driver that summer day in September when 45,000 curious spectators paid to watch a Formula 5,000 race along Ocean Boulevard--past the porno shops and the waterfront bars--and as many more watched for free from windows and balconies of high-rise buildings. He was driving a Viceroy Lola that day for Parnelli Jones and Vel Miletich, but after sitting on the pole with a speed of 89.450 m.p.h.
SPORTS
April 9, 2002 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can Chris Pook, who performed one miracle in racing more than 25 years ago, perform another this year? Pook's announcement last December that he could turn around the moribund Championship Auto Racing Teams, Inc., was met with as much skepticism as his 1975 announcement that he was planning to run a Formula One race down Ocean Boulevard in Long Beach. The fortunes of CART, once the premier open-wheel racing organization in the country, changed dramatically last year.
SPORTS
April 22, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mario Andretti was in Long Beach in 1975 when Chris Pook revolutionized motor racing by promoting the first modern-era temporary-circuit street race in the United States. Andretti, as usual, was the fastest driver that summer day in September when 45,000 curious spectators paid to watch a Formula 5,000 race along Ocean Boulevard--past the porno shops and the waterfront bars--and as many more watched for free from windows and balconies of high-rise buildings. He was driving a Viceroy Lola that day for Parnelli Jones and Vel Miletich, but after sitting on the pole with a speed of 89.450 m.p.h.
SPORTS
April 13, 1989 | MIKE KUPPER, Times Assistant Sports Editor
There has been car racing through the streets of Long Beach for a weekend a year since 1975, so this weekend's activities in connection with Sunday's Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach are not likely to catch a significant segment of the community by surprise. Nor, according to promoter Chris Pook, is the race a major bone of contention for Long Beach residents and businessmen, if ever it was, even though it is noisy, crowded, and does mess up downtown traffic, at least somewhat, for the better part of a week.
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