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Christian Brothers Winery

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BUSINESS
June 16, 1988 | DAN BERGER, Times Wine Writer
Christian Brothers Winery said Wednesday that it has bought Quail Ridge, a 10-year-old Napa Valley premium winery that was a subsidiary of a firm publicly traded on the Vancouver Stock Exchange. It is the first time in the 106-year history of Napa Valley-based Christian Brothers that it has bought another winery and it continues the firm's strong move under President Richard Maher into the field of super-premium wines.
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MAGAZINE
July 9, 1989 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
IN THE PROCESS of passing judgment on a bottle of Christian Brothers 1985 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($9), not long ago, I noted the wine's jewel-ruby color, the almost-berry scent of its 100% Cabernet breed and the restraint of the Limousin oak incense of its bouquet. This happy combination stirred me to applaud wine maker Tom Eddy's decision to refrain from bottling this wine until it had reached its peak of maturity by spending 18 months in French barrels.
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MAGAZINE
July 9, 1989 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
IN THE PROCESS of passing judgment on a bottle of Christian Brothers 1985 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($9), not long ago, I noted the wine's jewel-ruby color, the almost-berry scent of its 100% Cabernet breed and the restraint of the Limousin oak incense of its bouquet. This happy combination stirred me to applaud wine maker Tom Eddy's decision to refrain from bottling this wine until it had reached its peak of maturity by spending 18 months in French barrels.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1988 | DAN BERGER, Times Wine Writer
Christian Brothers Winery said Wednesday that it has bought Quail Ridge, a 10-year-old Napa Valley premium winery that was a subsidiary of a firm publicly traded on the Vancouver Stock Exchange. It is the first time in the 106-year history of Napa Valley-based Christian Brothers that it has bought another winery and it continues the firm's strong move under President Richard Maher into the field of super-premium wines.
MAGAZINE
July 19, 1987 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
On a glorious summery day in June, one of California's most handsome monuments to wine making, Greystone Wine Cellars on California 29 in St. Helena, was reopened to the public after an extensive three-year renovation period. Built of hand-hewn local volcanic rock in 1888, the great three-story structure was closed in 1984 after it was deemed seismically unsafe.
NEWS
March 9, 1994
Otto E. Meyer, 90, former president and board chairman of Paul Masson Vineyards. After emigrating from Germany in 1938, Meyer joined the Christian Brothers winery. In 1945, he moved to Masson where he supervised the building of champagne cellars and a new winery in Soledad, Calif. Meyer served as president and then board chairman from 1959 until his retirement in 1974.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1989 | DAN BERGER, Times Wine Writer
Napa Valley's 107-year-old Christian Brothers winery, whose profits help finance operation of a dozen Catholic schools, including Los Angeles' Cathedral High, flatly denies widespread rumors that it may be sold. "We're busy with other projects," Richard L. Maher, president of Christian Brothers Sales Co., said in an interview at the winery's headquarters here. The company rang up more than $100 million in sales last year, three-quarters of it from brandy, according to industry sources.
FOOD
September 7, 1995 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES FOOD DEPUTY EDITOR
Forget Time Warner and Walt Disney. In the culinary world, the real corporate battle of the decade seems to be shaping up between two of the country's top professional cooking schools. The Culinary Institute of America, long a prime training ground for talented young chefs, opened a West Coast campus in the Napa Valley in late August. Well-known for its manorial campus on a bluff overlooking the Hudson River just outside Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1986 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Incoming freshmen at Cathedral High School have traditionally been greeted with imaginative, though not always pleasant, hazing stunts by older students. On Tuesday, however, they were welcomed with loud cheers and speeches, including an announcement by Mayor Tom Bradley of a $100,000 donation for the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2002 | ROD SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vintner Justin Meyer, one of the founders of the high-quality Napa Valley wine industry and the creator of one of the first wines to attract a devoted following, has died. He was 63. Meyer died Tuesday while vacationing with his family near Lake Tahoe. The family would not specify the cause of death. With his friend and partner Ray Duncan, a Colorado oilman, Meyer founded Silver Oak Cellars in 1972.
MAGAZINE
July 19, 1987 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
On a glorious summery day in June, one of California's most handsome monuments to wine making, Greystone Wine Cellars on California 29 in St. Helena, was reopened to the public after an extensive three-year renovation period. Built of hand-hewn local volcanic rock in 1888, the great three-story structure was closed in 1984 after it was deemed seismically unsafe.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1987 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
The view from Dick Maher's home spans Napa Valley vineyards west to the picturesque hulk of Greystone Cellars, built just north of here in 1889 of hand-hewn volcanic rock. Maher was among those who urged Greystone's owner, the even older Christian Brothers Winery, to rehabilitate the venerable structure, which was vacated three years ago after engineers expressed doubt that it could survive a major earthquake. What Richard L.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, Benjamin Epstein is a free-lance writer who contributes frequently to The Times Orange County Edition.
Sotheby's in New York has re-released its coffee-table book, "Collectible Corkscrews." The edition, however, mentions no Orange County collectors, and inquiries among some of the county's most knowledgeable wine aficionados also failed to turn up a single local collector. While some may nevertheless exist, we had to take a hop over the county line to find an expert. "Some collectors get involved because of wine," said Pasadena's Michael Sharp, who is fascinated by the devices.
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