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Christian Film And Television Commission

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week before the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announces the film industry's own nominees for the best movies of 1992, proponents of "traditional family values" came to Hollywood on Wednesday to reveal their idea of 1992's Top 20 movies. The Christian Film and Television Commission's selections for "family audiences" included the Walt Disney Co.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week before the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announces the film industry's own nominees for the best movies of 1992, proponents of "traditional family values" came to Hollywood on Wednesday to reveal their idea of 1992's Top 20 movies. The Christian Film and Television Commission's selections for "family audiences" included the Walt Disney Co.'
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NEWS
February 2, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony called on the entertainment industry Saturday to consider a new code that would severely restrict the content of motion pictures and television programs by forbidding--among other things--nudity, suggestive dancing, lustful kissing and the portrayal of law enforcement officers dying at the hands of criminals. Mahony stopped short of calling for mandatory compliance with the code, authored by the Atlanta-based Christian Film and Television Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
Forget, for the moment, about all the violence in the "Rambo" movies, and the kinky sex in "Basic Instinct." Much of the sex, mayhem and rough language that rattles across the wide screen today is hardly shocking in a pop culture that often exploits human dignity for commercial ends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Civil Liberties Union, responding to Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's call for the entertainment industry to consider a new motion picture and television code, launched an anti-censorship campaign and petition drive Thursday urging the industry not to give in. In a full-page advertisement in the trade publication Daily Variety, the ACLU lambasted the proposed code, calling it "a list of moral rules that would return us to the 1950s."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
Forget, for the moment, about all the violence in the "Rambo" movies, and the kinky sex in "Basic Instinct." Much of the sex, mayhem and rough language that rattles across the wide screen today is hardly shocking in a pop culture that often exploits human dignity for commercial ends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1992
You misunderstood my call for greater leadership on the part of the creative and production segments of the film and television industries to halt the increasing violence, sexual exploitation, and the lessening of moral and family values found all too often in today's movies and television programs. You placed my picture within the excerpts from the new movie code offered by the Christian Film and Television Commission and as presented at the forum by Ted Baehr. That placement was misleading and incorrect.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
TV & MOVIES DGA Lauds Bochco: TV producer Steven Bochco--whose creations have included "NYPD Blue," "Hill Street Blues" and "L.A. Law"--will receive the Directors Guild of America's Diversity Award on March 6 at the Century Plaza Hotel. The award, being given for only the second time, honors Bochco's "consistent commitment to and leadership in the hiring of women and ethnic minorities."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1996 | ART BERMAN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Sly Lands Role: In an unusual pairing, the arty Miramax Films has signed on action superstar Sylvester Stallone to star in "Copland," a "Serpico"-type police drama about a hearing-impaired sheriff forced to decide between protecting the police and upholding the law. Written by James Mangold ("Heavy"), the $10-million picture is due to start shooting this summer for a possible Christmas release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1992 | AL MARTINEZ
Musical satirist Tom Lehrer once sang, "When properly viewed, everything's lewd." I mention this today because Lehrer's theory, popular in the 1950s, has been revived by none other than the Pope of L.A., Cardinal Roger Mahony. For those who don't follow the entertainment news, Mahony has endorsed a code proposed by the Christian Film and Television Commission that would regulate morality on the screen and the tube.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Civil Liberties Union, responding to Cardinal Roger M. Mahony's call for the entertainment industry to consider a new motion picture and television code, launched an anti-censorship campaign and petition drive Thursday urging the industry not to give in. In a full-page advertisement in the trade publication Daily Variety, the ACLU lambasted the proposed code, calling it "a list of moral rules that would return us to the 1950s."
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony called on the entertainment industry Saturday to consider a new code that would severely restrict the content of motion pictures and television programs by forbidding--among other things--nudity, suggestive dancing, lustful kissing and the portrayal of law enforcement officers dying at the hands of criminals. Mahony stopped short of calling for mandatory compliance with the code, authored by the Atlanta-based Christian Film and Television Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vicki Riley is hoping that tomorrow, Friday the 13th, is frightening for network television executives in more ways than one. Riley, 31, is the main force behind the second annual "Turn Off the TV Day," a grass-roots nationwide effort that she hopes will show executives that viewers are fed up with what she describes as excessive sex and violence on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Christian Film and Television Commission, an Atlanta-based media watchdog organization, is calling for "all moral Americans" to boycott "Paris Is Burning," a documentary look at the Harlem transvestite scene and the drag-ball "voguing" competitions in which blacks and Latinos mimic the preening of fashion models. The making of the film was partially funded by a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.
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