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Christian Tetzlaff

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2009 | Rick Schultz
Musicians who work together don't have to be friends. But after hearing pianist Leif Ove Andsnes and violinist Christian Tetzlaff in a stunning duo recital Thursday at Walt Disney Concert Hall, it clearly doesn't hurt if they are. In a well-conceived program of demanding sonatas by Janacek and Brahms in the first half, and lighter Mozart and Schubert in the second, the musicians' rapport and naturalness created a contemplative mood. That's not easy in such a big venue. Yet the force of this duo's concentration and confidence shrunk the cavernous Disney space to a size that felt just right for chamber music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2014 | By David Ng
Conductor Christoph Eschenbach and violinist Christian Tetzlaff have canceled their joint appearances scheduled for this weekend at Walt Disney Concert Hall.  The three concerts, which are still scheduled to take place Friday through Sunday, instead will feature conductor Edo de Waart and violinist Augustin Hadelich. The Los Angeles Philharmonic had originally been scheduled to perform Schoenberg's Violin Concerto as part of the program. The piece has been scratched and will be replaced with Beethoven's Violin Concerto.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | David Mermelstein
If record labels received awards for foresight, one would surely go to Virgin Classics, which in the early '90s thought to pair a young German fiddler with an even younger Norwegian pianist. The musicians -- Christian Tetzlaff and Leif Ove Andsnes -- were not unknowns, but neither were they the internationally revered artists they have become. In many instances, such a partnership would have dissolved after the pair achieved fame as soloists, their calendars increasingly filled with plum engagements and enticing new collaborations.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2009 | Rick Schultz
Musicians who work together don't have to be friends. But after hearing pianist Leif Ove Andsnes and violinist Christian Tetzlaff in a stunning duo recital Thursday at Walt Disney Concert Hall, it clearly doesn't hurt if they are. In a well-conceived program of demanding sonatas by Janacek and Brahms in the first half, and lighter Mozart and Schubert in the second, the musicians' rapport and naturalness created a contemplative mood. That's not easy in such a big venue. Yet the force of this duo's concentration and confidence shrunk the cavernous Disney space to a size that felt just right for chamber music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
In what continues to signal a fascinating if disturbing trend, two more young musicians of impressive talent related to music of this century with an intuitive empathy that was lacking when they tackled earlier standard repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
Given the evidence of the performance which closed the 29th season of the Laguna Beach Chamber Music Society, the emergence onto the professional stage of the current members of Musicians From Marlboro may be a bit premature. The latest crop of youngsters touring under that name--all supposedly having attended Rudolf Serkin's annual summer Marlboro Festival in Vermont--again ranges from four to nine artists in various combinations. The 1989 tour group reached the auditorium at Laguna Beach High School Tuesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2005 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
Christian Tetzlaff is a product of our time. Boyishly professorial, the violinist hails from Germany but studied in America. Born in 1966, he has processed the golden age's romantic soloists and today's historically informed ideologues and emerged innovative. He plays with soft-spoken wit, unafraid to end statements with cheeky question marks. His lean sounds narrate our culture wars but never fall victim to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1993 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German violinist Christian Tetzlaff, 26, is fast becoming known--in the United States at least--as an exponent of 20th-Century music. He made his American debut in Cleveland in 1988 with the fiendishly difficult Schoenberg Concerto, and this week he joins Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the Berg Concerto. Yet Tetzlaff, currently in the midst of a Beethoven sonatas cycle in Germany, is quick to disavow "any labels on music making."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2014 | By David Ng
Conductor Christoph Eschenbach and violinist Christian Tetzlaff have canceled their joint appearances scheduled for this weekend at Walt Disney Concert Hall.  The three concerts, which are still scheduled to take place Friday through Sunday, instead will feature conductor Edo de Waart and violinist Augustin Hadelich. The Los Angeles Philharmonic had originally been scheduled to perform Schoenberg's Violin Concerto as part of the program. The piece has been scratched and will be replaced with Beethoven's Violin Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When period instrument guru Roger Norrington bowed out because of illness, the Los Angeles Philharmonic's mini-survey of German Romanticism at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion began to look decidedly conventional. But his replacement, Jahja Ling, had ideas of his own about the agenda and took it over intact, with generally bracing results Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | David Mermelstein
If record labels received awards for foresight, one would surely go to Virgin Classics, which in the early '90s thought to pair a young German fiddler with an even younger Norwegian pianist. The musicians -- Christian Tetzlaff and Leif Ove Andsnes -- were not unknowns, but neither were they the internationally revered artists they have become. In many instances, such a partnership would have dissolved after the pair achieved fame as soloists, their calendars increasingly filled with plum engagements and enticing new collaborations.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2005 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
Christian Tetzlaff is a product of our time. Boyishly professorial, the violinist hails from Germany but studied in America. Born in 1966, he has processed the golden age's romantic soloists and today's historically informed ideologues and emerged innovative. He plays with soft-spoken wit, unafraid to end statements with cheeky question marks. His lean sounds narrate our culture wars but never fall victim to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
In what continues to signal a fascinating if disturbing trend, two more young musicians of impressive talent related to music of this century with an intuitive empathy that was lacking when they tackled earlier standard repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1993 | GRETA BEIGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German violinist Christian Tetzlaff, 26, is fast becoming known--in the United States at least--as an exponent of 20th-Century music. He made his American debut in Cleveland in 1988 with the fiendishly difficult Schoenberg Concerto, and this week he joins Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the Berg Concerto. Yet Tetzlaff, currently in the midst of a Beethoven sonatas cycle in Germany, is quick to disavow "any labels on music making."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
Given the evidence of the performance which closed the 29th season of the Laguna Beach Chamber Music Society, the emergence onto the professional stage of the current members of Musicians From Marlboro may be a bit premature. The latest crop of youngsters touring under that name--all supposedly having attended Rudolf Serkin's annual summer Marlboro Festival in Vermont--again ranges from four to nine artists in various combinations. The 1989 tour group reached the auditorium at Laguna Beach High School Tuesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2001 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Music inspired by Spain but written by French composers comprised the Tuesday program at the Hollywood Bowl, led by the Los Angeles Philharmonic's associate conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya. The agenda is not hard to imagine--Chabrier's "Espana," the "Symphonie Espagnole" by Lalo, and three pieces by Ravel, ending with "Bolero"--and the orchestra's performances emerged clean, bright and motivated.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014 | By Richard S. Ginell
Los Angeles Philharmonic fans were priming themselves for a rare bout with Schoenberg's formidable Violin Concerto to launch the new year on Friday night - with violinist Christian Tetzlaff and conductor Christoph Eschenbach presiding. But Tetzlaff and Eschenbach both canceled a few days prior, due to illness. So another violinist, the young, superbly equipped Augustin Hadelich, and a familiar figure from the San Francisco Symphony's past, conductor Edo de Waart, were rushed into the breach for what became Hadelich's Walt Disney Concert Hall debut.  Hadelich surely is used to this by now, for these were the same last-minute conditions in which he made his impressive 2008 Hollywood Bowl debut when both the conductor and violinist canceled.
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