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NEWS
January 6, 1999 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At lunchtime in Judge Frank Firmat's chambers if someone says, "All rise," be ready to stand and pray. Twice a week, Firmat calls together a small group of people, most of them judges and lawyers used to asking all the questions. At these meetings, they bare their own souls. The group of 12 is on an odyssey through the spiritual exercises, a daily practice created by Ignatius Loyola in the 16th century.
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WORLD
December 23, 2007 | Kimi Yoshino and Usama Redha, Times Staff Writers
Sajid Rasool Shakir sits on a busy street corner waiting for customers. Sometimes he waits for hours. But that he's open for business at all is a bit of a feat: Shakir sells Christmas trees. Last year, he didn't even bother. No one in the tiny Christian community was celebrating, and the streets were too dangerous to set up shop outdoors.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer-songwriter Michael W. Smith has six gold records. His latest has sold more than 250,000 copies since its September release. But success hasn't gone to his head. For one thing, he has his religion. "I've always felt my relationship with Christ is the most important thing in my life," Smith says from the Nashville recording studio where he's at work on another project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First there was Christian rock music, then Christian heavy metal, and lately Christian rap. All won gradual acceptance from church groups if the lyrics were God-oriented and performed by born-again artists. Now comes a musical assault on one of the most deeply entrenched taboos in many Christian churches--dancing. In the Bible Belt and beyond, evangelical churches have traditionally regarded dancing as just as sinful as drinking and fornication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Northern Ireland has endured 25 years of sectarian violence between Catholics and Protestants and eight months of peace. Now, as hundreds of business and political leaders gathered this week for a White House conference to encourage U.S. investment in the economically depressed country, Irish Cardinal Cahan Daly and Presbyterian leader John Dunlop conceded that jobs alone won't end the enmity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1991 | MIMI MANN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Egypt was an ancient, religious land under the stranglehold of Nero's Rome when the first strains of Christianity came quietly and swiftly across the Sinai Desert from Judea. How did the new religion arrive, who were the first Christians, what were the early teachings and how did the message spread and change? Legends and stories are far more plentiful than facts. German archeologist Peter Grossmann, who specializes in early Christian sites of the Near East, is trying to unlock the mysteries.
WORLD
December 26, 2003 | From Associated Press
Police were guarding a church in southern India on Thursday after more than 250 lower-caste villagers who converted to Christianity were barred from a Christmas Mass. The villagers, known as Dalit Christians after the lower-caste Hindu social group they once belonged to, were prevented from attending midnight Mass at St. Ebiben's Church in Manjakuppam, in southern Tamil Nadu state, about 1,100 miles south of New Delhi, by high-caste converts, Father Christopher Rethinasamy said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2007 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Sunday is Pentecost, the most important day in the Christian calendar after Easter and Christmas. Unlike those two well-known holidays, Pentecost -- commemorating the arrival of the Holy Spirit -- is not widely observed, even by many Christians. "How do you wish anybody a happy Pentecost?" asked the Rev. Eddie Gibbs, professor of church growth at Fuller Theological Seminary and an Episcopal priest in Pasadena. "They have Christmas cards galore, Easter cards to some extent. But Pentecost cards?"
NEWS
November 9, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II arrived in Georgia on Monday calling for "new bridges" between the long-estranged Eastern and Western branches of Christianity. But he met a wall of silence from the country's Orthodox Christian patriarch. The patriarch, Ilia II, refused to be drawn into an open discussion of Christian unity. In three joint appearances, he addressed the Roman Catholic leader only as a statesman, asking his help in resolving Georgia's worldly problems.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Saddam Hussein said Iraqis could leave their country for only the second time in more than 10 years of war, the Christians were at the head of the line. An estimated 30,000 Iraqis--a high percentage of them Christians--are now filling hotels and apartments here in the Jordanian capital. Many spend their days at Western consulates, hoping for a visa that will let them leave the Middle East, perhaps for good.
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