Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChristine O Donnell
IN THE NEWS

Christine O Donnell

NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
After a campaign that became a political spectacle, Chris Coons has defeated "tea party" favorite Christine O'Donnell, retaining for Democrats the Delaware Senate seat once held for more than 36 years by Vice President Joe Biden. Christine O'Donnell's 15 minutes of political fame actually lasted roughly 50 days. It was seven weeks ago that she shocked the political world by defeating nine-term Rep. Michael N. Castle, also the state's former governor, in the Republican primary. That race was influenced, like several others this year, by outside groups such as the Tea Party Express and a late endorsement from former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Michael Muskal
Christine O’Donnell, the Senate candidate who questioned whether separation of church and state was explicitly in the Constitution, said on Tuesday that she prays that her supporters will turn out and snatch victory from what polls say is a likely defeat. “I’m feeling very excited,” O’Donnell said after voting and dropping off a box of doughnuts, one of America’s favorite comfort foods.  “It’s neck and neck and I’m praying that everybody turns out.” O’Donnell, who upset the GOP establishment to win the Senate nomination, and her Democratic opponent, Chris Coons, voted Tuesday morning in Wilmington, Del. They are fighting for the seat held for more than 30 years by Vice President Joe Biden.
NEWS
September 16, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Christine O'Donnell's upset win in the Delaware Republican Senate primary has brought with it a major infusion of cash and now a featured role at this weekend's Values Voter Summit in Washington. FRC Action, which sponsors the annual gathering of social conservatives, announced the addition of O'Donnell to their schedule Thursday. It marks O'Donnell's first major public event since her stunning victory over Rep. Mike Castle in Tuesday's election. Even as some Republicans have expressed doubts about her electability, O'Donnell has been embraced by many conservative activists in the days since her victory.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
"Tea party"-backed Republican Christine O'Donnell went on the offensive Wednesday in Delaware's first Senate debate, accusing rival Chris Coons of being a "rubber stamp" for Democrats, as he tried to stick to points of policy. The campaign so far has largely focused on O'Donnell, who became an instant national figure after her surprise primary triumph over a moderate and disclosures about her conservative religious views that some have painted as extreme. Her debut campaign ad sought to address her past statements that she had dabbled in the black arts in high school.
NEWS
September 15, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Vice President Joe Biden said Tuesday's primary in his home state reflected a new reality in the Republican Party: that "no moderates need apply. " "It's real tough for the Republican Party. It's kind of hung on a shingle," he told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow in an interview to air Wednesday night. Biden said that in Chris Coons, Democrats have "a really first-rate candidate" to run in Delaware against Christine O'Donnell, whom Biden defeated in 2008 to earn his seventh term in the Senate while also winning the vice presidency.
NEWS
September 9, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Christine O'Donnell's once-quixotic campaign against Rep. Michael N. Castle in Delaware's U.S. Senate race got another late boost with the endorsement Thursday of former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. Palin announced her support for O'Donnell during an appearance on Sean Hannity's syndicated radio program, five days before Delaware's Republican primary. "She will support efforts for America's energy security, patient-centered healthcare reform, cutting government waste and letting the private sector thrive and prosper!"
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Locked in a close race for the seat representing Pennsylvania in the U.S. Senate, Republican Pat Toomey on Sunday insisted that he is no Christine O’Donnell. O’Donnell, the GOP senatorial candidate in neighboring Delaware, is a “tea party” movement favorite, whose conservative positions allowed her to defeat an establishment Republican for the senatorial nomination. Her campaign in the general election has been become bogged down in a variety of issues, including her campaign ad explaining that she is not really a witch.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
At a Tea Party Express rally last week, Christine O'Donnell bounded onto the stage and lit up the crowd with the same fiery style that has turned Tuesday's Senate primary into another battle for the future of the Republican Party. O'Donnell, a longtime activist who has made a career of crusading for abstinence-based sex education and other conservative issues, is now within striking distance of beating one of Delaware's best-known public figures: Rep. Michael N. Castle, the tiny state's sole representative in the House for nearly 20 years and before that its governor for two terms.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
Facing her opponent at a traditional campaign kickoff forum, Christine O'Donnell fielded the opening question, on Middle East peace, without her usual off-the-cuff patriotic zeal. Instead, she responded with a more studied technique: She glanced down at the stack of papers before her, and noticeably read from her notes. In the days after her renegade campaign for U.S. Senate scored a stunning Republican primary upset in Delaware, O'Donnell was finding out just what it meant to be, as she calls herself, "a citizen legislator.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Marco Rubio, a "tea party" movement favorite, was elected to the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, easily winning a three-way race that included Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, a one-time rising star in the Republican Party. The victory means a conservative will take over the Senate seat now held by a more moderate Republican. The Senate's division between the major parties won't change, but the GOP will continue its move to the right. Democrat Kendrick Meek, who ran third, waged what has been a traditional Democratic campaign in this midterm cycle, backing the Obama administration's efforts on economic stimulus, healthcare insurance overhaul and Wall Street regulation.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|