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Christo Artist

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Christoland, the countdown had reached Day 138. That many days remained before the flowering at Gorman of the latest gigantic environmental sculpture by the artist Christo. Toiling on it on a sunny Thursday not long ago were workers in offices, factories, classrooms, rice fields and on mountainsides. They were in Tokyo, Toronto, San Diego, Ft. Worth, Bakersfield, the German city of Bayreuth, the little Japanese town of Hitachi-ota and on the Grapevine along Interstate 5.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2005 | GERALDINE BAUM
For four decades, Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, have traversed the world wrapping mammoth structures, surrounding islands with fabric, filling fields with giant umbrellas, turning streets, bridges, coastlines, hills, trees -- even a Volkswagen -- into sculpture. And during all that time the artists were living, working, and raising their only child in a funky loft north of Canal Street in SoHo. New York was always home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES CRITIC AT LARGE
Christo, the artist who stretched an opalescent fence across Sonoma County, wrapped the Pont Neuf in Paris and made pink lily pads out of islands in Miami's Biscayne Bay, is in full swing again, this time on a project close at hand. To these eyes, it's a sign as cheerful as spring. Currently, he's to be found on the art-museum circuit, talking up his vast new project, the Umbrellas. In a way, he's spreading the word that will produce the necessary masses of workers for the big push in October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997
The assignment before a group of Cal State Long Beach design students was to create an exhibit showcasing past and future projects of world-famous landscape artist Christo--not emulate his near-mistakes. But less than a week before the opening of the exhibit Tuesday, the students found themselves stuck in much the same position the artist faced while surrounding Miami's Biscayne Bay islands in 1983: the absence of the material needed to complete the project.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,700 giant yellow umbrellas fluttered open Wednesday on the barren, tan slopes of the Tejon Pass north of Los Angeles, completing one of the largest undertakings in modern art history--the creation of twin forests of colorful canopies in California and Japan by environmental artist Christo. The strange sight produced jubilation, wisecracks, bafflement and tears of joy.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | Robert A. Jones
In two years, almost exactly, an odd repetition of history will take place here. Up on the Grapevine, the artist Christo is going to transform the sunburnt hills of the Tehachapis into a habitat for 1,700 gigantic umbrellas. Yellow streams of umbrellas will flow down the ridgelines; clusters of umbrellas will fill whole valleys. They will remain for three weeks and then disappear as quickly as they came. The Grapevine will never seem the same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997
The assignment before a group of Cal State Long Beach design students was to create an exhibit showcasing past and future projects of world-famous landscape artist Christo--not emulate his near-mistakes. But less than a week before the opening of the exhibit Tuesday, the students found themselves stuck in much the same position the artist faced while surrounding Miami's Biscayne Bay islands in 1983: the absence of the material needed to complete the project.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
To wintertime motorists, the Grapevine can sometimes be as inviting as a drive on a frozen lake bed. In the summer, it can become an obstacle course of overheated cars that never reach the top. But Christo is coming, and he just might change the Grapevine's sorry reputation. And he is bringing giant yellow umbrellas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989
"Wrap" artist Christo and playwright John Guare are among 10 cultural figures have been elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, an organization chartered by Congress in 1913 as the nation's honor society of the arts. Christo, 53, whose full name is Christo Javaceff, creates art by wrapping fabric and plastic around things such as islands, buildings and bridges. He was born in Bulgaria and is a naturalized American.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a true test of marital togetherness and stamina--five days of pre-dawn breakfasts and long, hot days in a meadow on the Christo umbrella project. But Bill and Charlotte Lyle, a Granada Hills couple in their 70s, weathered the experience on Crew 106 with the same enthusiasm and humor that has kept them together all this time. "We both worked all our lives, so we didn't really get to be together much," said Charlotte, 71, a former teacher.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | From Reuters
Dawn broke over Germany's future Parliament building resplendent in a covering of silver reflective fabric Saturday after arsonists unsuccessfully tried to sabotage artist Christo's controversial work by setting it afire. "They fired a burning arrow at the front portal. It burned for a while, making a small hole, and then fizzled out. The silver fabric is flameproof so it doesn't burn long," said a spokeswoman for the New York-based artist. Police are investigating the attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 200 workers Monday scurried to temporarily crank down Christo's 1,760 giant umbrellas in the Tejon Pass as a precaution against strong wind gusts. The umbrellas were later opened as winds eased. Weather forecasters "had told us that the big high winds predicted for Tuesday night were going to be Wednesday night, and then they say the big winds are not coming at all, so we take a gamble," said Jeanne-Claude Christo-Javacheff, the artist's wife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like thousands of other people in Southern California, Fred Paredez has seen the 1,760 giant yellow umbrellas displayed by the artist Christo along Interstate 5 in Tejon Pass. But Paredez watches them only at night. "It's not the prettiest time to see the umbrellas, but some strange things happen here at night," said Paredez, head of the night security team for the Umbrellas Project. Paredez oversees about 80 employees who guard the umbrellas from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advocates for cows, dogs, students, artists and the homeless are eyeing the 1,760 umbrellas along Interstate 5 in the Tejon Pass--to no avail. All say the 20-foot-tall umbrellas erected as part of an international art project by environmental artist Christo are just what is needed as protection from the sun or rain. But Christo decided years ago to destroy the umbrellas for artistic reasons and recycle the material--and, if he changes his mind, he would be liable for $350,000 in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The promising market created by thousands of tourists drawn by Christo's umbrellas project attracted scores of eager souvenir vendors to the usually deserted side roads in the Tejon Pass area during the three-day weekend. The sleepy streets of Gorman, Lebec, Frazier Park and Grapevine blossomed into a middle American version of the Venice boardwalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Fifteen years after creating an international ruckus by stringing some 24 miles of light-reflective fabric fence across the gorgeous rolling hills of Sonoma and Marin counties, the Bulgarian expatriate artist Christo has returned to California to execute another temporary extravaganza. Or, at least, half an extravaganza. The event is taking place simultaneously in Japan, in rural farming country a little more than an hour's drive north of Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2005 | GERALDINE BAUM
For four decades, Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, have traversed the world wrapping mammoth structures, surrounding islands with fabric, filling fields with giant umbrellas, turning streets, bridges, coastlines, hills, trees -- even a Volkswagen -- into sculpture. And during all that time the artists were living, working, and raising their only child in a funky loft north of Canal Street in SoHo. New York was always home.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | From Reuters
Dawn broke over Germany's future Parliament building resplendent in a covering of silver reflective fabric Saturday after arsonists unsuccessfully tried to sabotage artist Christo's controversial work by setting it afire. "They fired a burning arrow at the front portal. It burned for a while, making a small hole, and then fizzled out. The silver fabric is flameproof so it doesn't burn long," said a spokeswoman for the New York-based artist. Police are investigating the attack.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a true test of marital togetherness and stamina--five days of pre-dawn breakfasts and long, hot days in a meadow on the Christo umbrella project. But Bill and Charlotte Lyle, a Granada Hills couple in their 70s, weathered the experience on Crew 106 with the same enthusiasm and humor that has kept them together all this time. "We both worked all our lives, so we didn't really get to be together much," said Charlotte, 71, a former teacher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991
Wednesday was the grand opening of artist Christo's latest temporary outdoor art project, "The Umbrellas." Here is some help in viewing: * Open: Through Oct. 30. * Where: Along Interstate 5 for 18 miles north from the intersection of California 138 to the bottom of the Grapevine in the San Joaquin Valley. * Directions: Take I-5 north from Los Angeles, about 60 miles from downtown. * Turnarounds: At Quail Lake Road, Gorman, Frazier Park, Lebec and Ft. Tejon exits.
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