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Christon

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1988
Christon's article was a marvelous spoof on criticism. Imagine applying the critical standards of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolff" to a half-hour episode of a blue-collar failure of a family. To subject Roseanne and her loveable husband to the rigors of Edward Albee's characters really takes a stretch of wackiness. Christon's should lighten up and accept "Roseanne" for what it is: a half-hour of hot fudge sundae for the mind. It's good, clean, family fun. Why not enjoy it?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989
Last year, The Times published an interview with Jay Leno containing a joke I believed to be homophobic, and I complained about that in a letter that Calendar printed. The morning my letter appeared, Jay called me at my home and apologized, saying he had not meant the joke to offend anyone. I was struck by the effort he made to clear up an issue that a potential fan had raised. Since then, I have found that, indeed, his comedy does not pick on groups of people--a fact that is made clear in Christon's feature.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1987
Christon, because of his sheltered bourgeois existence, is so out of touch with the reality that most of us have to face that he dismisses Kinison's hilarious and brilliant commentary on the sheer unfocused rage that permeates life as "reactionary, infantile, pre-verbal." Such petty name-calling seems to be typical of Nice Liberals such as the greater majority of The Times staff. Rather than "civilize our sexual and theological conflicts," i.e., pretend that they never existed, Kinison dares to reveal them and strike back at them through screaming.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1988
Christon's article was a marvelous spoof on criticism. Imagine applying the critical standards of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolff" to a half-hour episode of a blue-collar failure of a family. To subject Roseanne and her loveable husband to the rigors of Edward Albee's characters really takes a stretch of wackiness. Christon's should lighten up and accept "Roseanne" for what it is: a half-hour of hot fudge sundae for the mind. It's good, clean, family fun. Why not enjoy it?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1987
Enough already! I am writing in behalf of my contemporaries and myself. Many of us are "struggling actors" but we are up and coming. I am so sick and tired of typical, negative articles with invalid statistics that attempt to discourage and dissuade one from his dream. It is obvious if not predetermined that the realities are tough, but we are not "aimless young narcissists"--not by a long shot! Some of us are young, most of us are hardworking and talented with a true love of the theater and a selfless dedication to an art. Some of us may be deluded by the fantasy of overnight success--but so what!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989
Last year, The Times published an interview with Jay Leno containing a joke I believed to be homophobic, and I complained about that in a letter that Calendar printed. The morning my letter appeared, Jay called me at my home and apologized, saying he had not meant the joke to offend anyone. I was struck by the effort he made to clear up an issue that a potential fan had raised. Since then, I have found that, indeed, his comedy does not pick on groups of people--a fact that is made clear in Christon's feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1989
I felt stunned and sad when I read what Bill Cosby had to say about his daughter in Lawrence Christon's Dec. 10 article. I do not know anything about Erinn Cosby, but I do know that wherever she is tonight, she is filled with sorrow at seeing those words in print. One of the loneliest experiences a human being can have is to be the recipient of blame and condemnation by a parent. It is a common but tragic mistake to single out one child as being "the problem" in a family.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1989
At last someone has exposed the most overrated comedian in America ("Laughing on Empty," by Lawrence Christon, Jan. 17). Good call, Mr. Christon--keep checking out the rip-offs. SHEILA KRAMER Studio City
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1988
Lawrence Christon has all the requirements of a great comedy critic save one: A sense of humor. JEFFREY D. SMITH Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1987
Enough already! I am writing in behalf of my contemporaries and myself. Many of us are "struggling actors" but we are up and coming. I am so sick and tired of typical, negative articles with invalid statistics that attempt to discourage and dissuade one from his dream. It is obvious if not predetermined that the realities are tough, but we are not "aimless young narcissists"--not by a long shot! Some of us are young, most of us are hardworking and talented with a true love of the theater and a selfless dedication to an art. Some of us may be deluded by the fantasy of overnight success--but so what!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1987
Christon, because of his sheltered bourgeois existence, is so out of touch with the reality that most of us have to face that he dismisses Kinison's hilarious and brilliant commentary on the sheer unfocused rage that permeates life as "reactionary, infantile, pre-verbal." Such petty name-calling seems to be typical of Nice Liberals such as the greater majority of The Times staff. Rather than "civilize our sexual and theological conflicts," i.e., pretend that they never existed, Kinison dares to reveal them and strike back at them through screaming.
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