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October 18, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cleveland Orchestra music director Christoph von Dohnanyi speaks calmly as he turns one of the basic ideas in classical music programming on its ear. "Our reaction to the music of the past is much more in jeopardy of being wrong than our reaction to music of our day," Dohnanyi said in a recent phone interview from Dallas, where he was conducting the Cleveland before its Costa Mesa performances on Tuesday and Wednesday for the Orange County Philharmonic Society (and its UCLA date on Oct. 26).
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February 24, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
There's more than one Brahms. One is the young composer, a musical firebrand and, on the evidence of contemporary portraits, a dashing dreamboat. Another is the better-known, formidable old man we see in the daguerreotypes: a sturdy, bearded, cigar-smoking classicist who wrote thick, heavy symphonies. Schoenberg thought Brahms a model for modernism, but he had to argue his case hard. By the early 20th century, Brahms already represented the past.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2004 | Donna Perlmutter, Special to The Times
Like a newly available bachelor, Christoph von Dohnanyi is going out on lots of dates these days. The renowned conductor led the top-ranked Cleveland Orchestra for 20 years but, since stepping down in 2000, has been free of the contractual obligation to remain tied exclusively to that ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2007 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
At 77, conductor Christoph von Dohnanyi is an elder statesman who knows what's necessary and what's superfluous in a performance. Music director of the Cleveland Orchestra for nearly two decades, he's fought all the battles many times, filtering out striking personal inflections and paring down interpretive extremes to focus on grand architectural structures.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1990 | ALLAN ULRICH
Dohnanyi leads a straight-on performance of what augurs to be Mahler's most recorded symphony. The Clevelanders render it with that lean, mean technical mastery that probably makes them unique among American orchestras. But Dohnanyi's structurally coherent reading imprint itself on the memory only in the central Scherzo and the buoyant contrapuntalism of the Rondo-Finale.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2007 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
At 77, conductor Christoph von Dohnanyi is an elder statesman who knows what's necessary and what's superfluous in a performance. Music director of the Cleveland Orchestra for nearly two decades, he's fought all the battles many times, filtering out striking personal inflections and paring down interpretive extremes to focus on grand architectural structures.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
There's more than one Brahms. One is the young composer, a musical firebrand and, on the evidence of contemporary portraits, a dashing dreamboat. Another is the better-known, formidable old man we see in the daguerreotypes: a sturdy, bearded, cigar-smoking classicist who wrote thick, heavy symphonies. Schoenberg thought Brahms a model for modernism, but he had to argue his case hard. By the early 20th century, Brahms already represented the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
In 1984, Christoph von Dohnanyi became music director of an orchestra many felt was the finest in America. In 2002, he left the Cleveland Orchestra perhaps even finer than he found it. The intervening years were very good ones for Cleveland -- and for music in America. Dohnanyi not only proved a model caretaker of a great orchestra but the model of a responsible music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
To celebrate its 70th anniversary, the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, led by Zubin Mehta, will broadcast 13 internationally aired radio segments, hosted by Itzhak Perlman and featuring performances by Joshua Bell, Christoph von Dohnanyi, Yoel Levi, Pinchas Zukerman, Mehta and other acclaimed soloists and conductors. "The Heartbeat of a Nation: The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra at 70" will be heard locally on classical music station KMZT-FM (105.1).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2008 | Chris Pasles
Pianist Pierre-Laurent Aimard has canceled his appearances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic next Thursday through Sunday at Walt Disney Concert Hall on doctor's orders because of back strain. Peter Serkin will fill in with a slight change in program. Replacing Janacek's Capriccio for Piano Left Hand and Winds will be Messiaen's "Petites esquisses d'oiseaux" (Small Sketches of Birds) for piano solo. The remainder of the program, to be conducted by Christoph von Dohnanyi, will be the same: Messiaen's "Oiseaux exotiques" (Exotic Birds)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
In 1984, Christoph von Dohnanyi became music director of an orchestra many felt was the finest in America. In 2002, he left the Cleveland Orchestra perhaps even finer than he found it. The intervening years were very good ones for Cleveland -- and for music in America. Dohnanyi not only proved a model caretaker of a great orchestra but the model of a responsible music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2004 | Donna Perlmutter, Special to The Times
Like a newly available bachelor, Christoph von Dohnanyi is going out on lots of dates these days. The renowned conductor led the top-ranked Cleveland Orchestra for 20 years but, since stepping down in 2000, has been free of the contractual obligation to remain tied exclusively to that ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cleveland Orchestra music director Christoph von Dohnanyi speaks calmly as he turns one of the basic ideas in classical music programming on its ear. "Our reaction to the music of the past is much more in jeopardy of being wrong than our reaction to music of our day," Dohnanyi said in a recent phone interview from Dallas, where he was conducting the orchestra before its San Diego performance Friday night at 8 o'clock at Civic Theatre. "Our music is very close to us," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1990 | ALLAN ULRICH
Dohnanyi leads a straight-on performance of what augurs to be Mahler's most recorded symphony. The Clevelanders render it with that lean, mean technical mastery that probably makes them unique among American orchestras. But Dohnanyi's structurally coherent reading imprint itself on the memory only in the central Scherzo and the buoyant contrapuntalism of the Rondo-Finale.
NEWS
February 23, 2006
As part of the celebrations of Mozart's 250th birthday, the Los Angeles Philharmonic is turning to the work he composed on his deathbed and didn't live to finish, the Requiem in D minor. Christoph von Dohnanyi will be the conductor. Additionally, 23-year-old American pianist Orion Weiss will be the soloist in the Concerto No. 19, K. 459. The Requiem, K.
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