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Christopher A Darden

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NEWS
October 30, 1995 | Associated Press
In his first public appearance since O.J. Simpson was acquitted of murder charges, prosecutor Christopher A. Darden asked that people reject criticism that the verdict was based on race. "There was a lot more to that verdict than you know," Darden told an audience of 750 at the University of Miami Law School. "I am not about to call this a race-based verdict." Darden said that bad experiences with police made jurors more willing to acquit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Members of the O.J. Simpson defense "dream team" were back in action 17 years after the legendary murder trial, this time defending the name of their late colleague, Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. It all started last week in New York, when former Simpson prosecutor Christopher A. Darden alleged to a law school audience that Cochran tampered with the infamous "bloody glove," a key piece of evidence in the murder case. During the trial in the stabbing deaths of Simpson's former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Lyle Goldman, Simpson tried on bloody gloves.
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NEWS
March 17, 1995 | CARLA RIVERA
Seeking to capitalize on his lawyers' role in the O.J Simpson trial, Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti argued before the Board of Supervisors Thursday that county prosecutors such as Marcia Clark and Christopher A. Darden deserve a pay raise. Using the long hours put in by Clark and Darden as examples, Garcetti proposed that all prosecutors receive a pay hike of between 2.2% and 11%, effective July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal appeals court judge said Tuesday that the verdict in the O.J. Simpson murder trial was "astonishing," and he decried the "bizarre and unseemly" rush of participants in the case to sell books about their experiences. Judge Stephen Reinhardt of Los Angeles was particularly critical of the lucrative deals made by deputy district attorneys Marcia Clark and Christopher A. Darden, the lead prosecutors, who garnered $4.2 million and $1.3 million, respectively, for their as-told-to books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1995 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest casualty of the fallout from the O.J. Simpson trial is good relations among some members of the Los Angeles County Bar Assn. Factions of the 21,000-member association are at odds over whether Simpson prosecutors Marcia Clark and Christopher A. Darden should be named 1995 Trial Lawyers of the Year for their feisty but unsuccessful attempt to convict the former athlete of double murder.
NEWS
February 24, 1995
UCLA law professor Peter Arenella and Loyola University law professor Laurie Levenson offer their take on the Simpson trial. Joining them is Los Angeles defense lawyer Paul J. Fitzgerald, who will rotate with other experts as the case moves forward. Today's topic: cross-examination of LAPD Detective Tom Lange and Judge Lance A. Ito's confrontation with prosecutor Christopher A. Darden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1995 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of Los Angeles' most prominent blacks plan to honor Deputy Dist. Atty. Christopher A. Darden, the only African American on the O.J. Simpson prosecution team, to repudiate the notion that Darden is an outcast in the black community. Darden, who was reviled by some African Americans for his role in the Simpson case, will be feted next week at an affair organized by county Supervisor Yvonne Brathwaite Burke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal appeals court judge said Tuesday that the verdict in the O.J. Simpson murder trial was "astonishing," and he decried the "bizarre and unseemly" rush of participants in the case to sell books about their experiences. Judge Stephen Reinhardt of Los Angeles was particularly critical of the lucrative deals made by deputy district attorneys Marcia Clark and Christopher A. Darden, the lead prosecutors, who garnered $4.2 million and $1.3 million, respectively, for their as-told-to books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1995 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti's decision to award nearly $43,000 in bonuses to the lead prosecutors in the O.J. Simpson case has whipped up a storm of criticism from others on Garcetti's staff, some of whom are demanding similar compensation for anyone who works long, difficult hours on a case. So angry are some staff members about the 11% temporary pay raises given to Deputy Dist. Attys. William Hodgman, Marcia Clark and Christopher A. Darden that a group of them is considering filing a grievance.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christopher A. Darden, who unsuccessfully prosecuted O.J. Simpson for murder, said Tuesday that he will write a book about his experiences during the trial and may never return to work in the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. "I always felt that I owed a debt and I think I've paid that debt," Darden, one of the lead Simpson prosecutors, said of his tenure as a deputy district attorney.
BOOKS
March 31, 1996 | Bill Boyarsky, Bill Boyarsky commented on the O.J. Simpson trial in his Times column, "The Spin."
Of all the characters in the O.J. Simpson murder trial, Christopher Darden was by far the most interesting, complex and difficult. Difficult certainly describes my acquaintance with him when I was writing about that long, long ordeal. Sometimes, when we ran into each other outside the courtroom, he'd tell me my commentaries were just plain ignorant. On another occasion, he asked my opinion about an interview he'd given to a journalist and listened to me as if he thought I was intelligent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deputy Dist. Atty. Christopher A. Darden shouldered plenty of knocks during the double murder trial of O.J. Simpson. Critics charged that he made the prosecution team only because he is African American. Others called him an "Uncle Tom." But on Wednesday the critics were nowhere to be seen amid hundreds of adoring fans who lined up at a Westside bookstore to buy a copy of "In Contempt," Darden's caustic account of the "trial of the century."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1995 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of Los Angeles' most prominent blacks plan to honor Deputy Dist. Atty. Christopher A. Darden, the only African American on the O.J. Simpson prosecution team, to repudiate the notion that Darden is an outcast in the black community. Darden, who was reviled by some African Americans for his role in the Simpson case, will be feted next week at an affair organized by county Supervisor Yvonne Brathwaite Burke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1995 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest casualty of the fallout from the O.J. Simpson trial is good relations among some members of the Los Angeles County Bar Assn. Factions of the 21,000-member association are at odds over whether Simpson prosecutors Marcia Clark and Christopher A. Darden should be named 1995 Trial Lawyers of the Year for their feisty but unsuccessful attempt to convict the former athlete of double murder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1995 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti's decision to award nearly $43,000 in bonuses to the lead prosecutors in the O.J. Simpson case has whipped up a storm of criticism from others on Garcetti's staff, some of whom are demanding similar compensation for anyone who works long, difficult hours on a case. So angry are some staff members about the 11% temporary pay raises given to Deputy Dist. Attys. William Hodgman, Marcia Clark and Christopher A. Darden that a group of them is considering filing a grievance.
NEWS
November 6, 1995 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This isn't about love at first sight. It's about love at 72nd sight, and under some of the most stressful, adrenalin-pumping conditions imaginable. Or it's not love, as the case may be. But tongues and tabloids have been wagging with speculation about the supposed after-hours liaison between O.J. Simpson prosecutors Marcia Clark and Christopher Darden. In the Nov. 13 issue of People magazine, columnist Mitchell Fink reports that Darden says he'll marry Clark when her divorce comes through.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deputy Dist. Atty. Christopher A. Darden shouldered plenty of knocks during the double murder trial of O.J. Simpson. Critics charged that he made the prosecution team only because he is African American. Others called him an "Uncle Tom." But on Wednesday the critics were nowhere to be seen amid hundreds of adoring fans who lined up at a Westside bookstore to buy a copy of "In Contempt," Darden's caustic account of the "trial of the century."
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Was Thursday's tense standoff between an angry Judge Lance A. Ito and a recalcitrant deputy district attorney, Christopher A. Darden, high drama or low farce? Legal analysts were divided. But they agreed that the scene that developed when Ito came close to holding Darden in contempt--for refusing to apologize for a remark during a so-called sidebar conference--embodied two of the O.J.
NEWS
October 30, 1995 | Associated Press
In his first public appearance since O.J. Simpson was acquitted of murder charges, prosecutor Christopher A. Darden asked that people reject criticism that the verdict was based on race. "There was a lot more to that verdict than you know," Darden told an audience of 750 at the University of Miami Law School. "I am not about to call this a race-based verdict." Darden said that bad experiences with police made jurors more willing to acquit.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christopher A. Darden, who unsuccessfully prosecuted O.J. Simpson for murder, said Tuesday that he will write a book about his experiences during the trial and may never return to work in the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. "I always felt that I owed a debt and I think I've paid that debt," Darden, one of the lead Simpson prosecutors, said of his tenure as a deputy district attorney.
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