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Christopher A Darden

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressing for a rapid conclusion to the "39th and Dalton" trial, attorneys representing three Los Angeles police officers rested their case Thursday after only one defense witness testified. When the prosecutor, Christopher A. Darden, announced Wednesday that he was resting his case, "my feeling was he just threw in the towel," said defense lawyer Barry Levin, who represents Capt. Thomas Elfmont. By that time, Darden had called 25 witnesses.
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NEWS
May 12, 1995 | JIM NEWTON and ANDREA FORD
Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito has tried again and again to control the courtroom behavior of lawyers in the murder trial of O.J. Simpson. He has scolded them in front of the jury and has spelled out his rules of decorum in painstaking detail. But Thursday, his response to yet another outburst was to slam his hands down on his desk, glare and take some money out of their pockets. When defense lawyer Peter Neufeld and Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | CARLA RIVERA
Seeking to capitalize on his lawyers' role in the O.J Simpson trial, Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti argued before the Board of Supervisors Thursday that county prosecutors such as Marcia Clark and Christopher A. Darden deserve a pay raise. Using the long hours put in by Clark and Darden as examples, Garcetti proposed that all prosecutors receive a pay hike of between 2.2% and 11%, effective July 1.
NEWS
April 12, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He designed the 1970 "Charlie's Angels" mane of Farrah Fawcett and created the famous "frump" cut for Diane Keaton in the movie "Annie Hall." Now Allen Edwards' scissors have once again sliced a place for him in the limelight--this time for the new hairstyle of O.J. Simpson prosecutor Marcia Clark, who returned to court Tuesday with a darker, straighter shag.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON and HENRY WEINSTEIN and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A somber, stony-faced Detective Mark Fuhrman asserted his 5th Amendment rights against self-incrimination three times Wednesday, refusing to answer questions posed by defense lawyers who charge that he framed O.J. Simpson. "Was the testimony that you gave at the preliminary hearing in this case completely truthful?" defense attorney Gerald F. Uelmen asked in a quick, pointed confrontation with Fuhrman, who has told jurors he found a bloody glove at Simpson's estate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN
Just as the circus has its sideshows, so the Simpson trial has its sidebars. A transcript of one released Wednesday throws new light on a pair of this week's continuing dramas. One has to do with the jurors' choice of literature, in this case John Grisham's best-selling novel "The Rainmaker," which includes an incident of domestic violence. During a bench conference on the matter Tuesday, Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito said to defense attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2003 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles police officer who is accused of improperly gaining access to law enforcement databases sold confidential information to the National Enquirer, according to testimony before a police disciplinary board. "He told me he sold it to tabloids, specifically the Enquirer," said Cyndy Truhan, in sworn testimony before the board that is considering possible penalties against Officer Kelly Chrisman. The board is scheduled to resume hearings today.
NEWS
February 24, 1995
UCLA law professor Peter Arenella and Loyola University law professor Laurie Levenson offer their take on the Simpson trial. Joining them is Los Angeles defense lawyer Paul J. Fitzgerald, who will rotate with other experts as the case moves forward. Today's topic: cross-examination of LAPD Detective Tom Lange and Judge Lance A. Ito's confrontation with prosecutor Christopher A. Darden.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Cowlings, O.J. Simpson's best friend who was at the wheel during the famous low-speed pursuit preceding the football great's arrest, will not be prosecuted for his role in the flight, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office announced Monday. In a one-line statement, prosecutors explained that "the evidence available to us at this time is insufficient to warrant prosecution" of Cowlings.
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