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Christopher Dorner

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013
The bullet-riddled bodies of a young Irvine couple were found on a parking garage roof, and nobody had heard a sound. The next day, an auto shop worker found a police uniform in a garbage bin 100 miles away. It led to a terrifying discovery. Christopher Dorner, a disgraced ex-LAPD officer, had sworn revenge on those he blamed for his firing. He had vowed to kill them all… and their families.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Law enforcement officers who faced off with Christopher Dorner  at a cabin near Big Bear have been formally cleared of wrongdoing by the San Bernardino County district attorney's office. In a  59-page report  released Tuesday, officials said the many sheriff's deputies, police officers and game wardens who were involved in the standoff violated no laws and "had no choice" but to engage in a fierce firefight with the fugitive. Holed up in the cabin, Dorner eventually killed himself with a gunshot to the head.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun and Joel Rubin
With no "arrest and conviction" of fugitive ex-cop Christopher Dorner--the subject of an intense manhunt last month--some donors to a $1-million reward are rethinking their pledges. The LAPD says there's still enough for a $1-million payout, but the city of Riverside has already rescinded its $100,000 contribution for information leading to Dorner's "arrest and conviction. " "Because the conditions were not met, there will not be a payment of a reward by the city," said Riveside city spokeswoman Cindie Perry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Law enforcement officers who faced off with Christopher Dorner at a cabin in Big Bear violated no laws and "had no choice" but to engage in a fierce firefight with the fugitive, according to a detailed review of the incident by prosecutors. In a 59-page report released Tuesday, the San Bernardino County district attorney's office formally cleared more than three dozen officers from several law enforcement agencies who were involved in the standoff. The findings mean no criminal charges will be brought against any of the officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Suspected killer Christopher Dorner spent his final hours barricaded inside a mountain cabin splattered with blood, presumably his own, and no chance for escape before a single gunshot echoed from inside the vacation home near Big Bear. The blood-splattered walls inside the cabin were revealed during the Feb. 12 standoff when a robotic police tractor started tearing down the cabin walls to give officers a clean view inside and were seen more than half an hour before the cabin caught fire after police fired seven "pyrotechnic" tear gas canisters into the cabin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A woman believed to be among the first two homicide victims of former L.A. police officer Christopher Dorner died of three gunshot wounds to the back of the head, according to a coroner's report obtained Monday by The Times. Monica Quan and her fiancé, Keith Lawrence, were shot to death in an Irvine parking garage in early February. DORNER MANHUNT: Full Coverage Quan, 28, also received a "tangential gunshot wound" on her right forearm, according to autopsy report the from Orange County Sheriff-Coroner's office.  Lawrence, 27, was shot multiple times, including five times in the head and face and twice in his back and neck, according to his autopsy report.  WHO THEY WERE: Victims in the Dorner case The couple were found in Lawrence's white Kia Optima, which was riddled with bullet holes, authorities have said.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
He was, by every account, both a cop killer and a killer cop, and even in death, he might end up shaking the LAPD like no one since Rodney King. Christopher Dorner regarded himself as a victim of institutional racism and a wronged man unfairly turned out of uniform by the LAPD.   Finding out whether there is any merit to his claims could require the LAPD to open itself to the kind of scrutiny the department underwent with the Christopher Commission 20 years ago, and the federal consent decrees that came on its heels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2013 | By Phil Willon
Suspected killer Christopher Dorner spent his final hours barricaded inside a mountain cabin splattered with blood, presumably his own, and no chance for escape before a single gunshot echoed from inside the vacation home near Big Bear. The blood-splattered walls inside the cabin were revealed during the Feb. 12 standoff when a robotic police tractor started tearing down the cabin walls to give officers a clean view inside, and were seen more than a half-hour before the cabin caught fire after police fired seven “pyrotechnic” tear gas canisters into the cabin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Eleven parties have submitted claims to the $1-million reward offered in the Christopher Dorner case under revised guidelines to allocate the money, LAPD officials say. Friday was the deadline for people to file claims for a portion of the reward, which has been reduced as contributing agencies have backed out and others have sued to receive some of the money. On Tuesday, the city of Los Angeles reached a $4.2-million settlement with two women shot during the Dorner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2013
Join Times staff writer Christopher Goffard at 9 a.m. Monday for an L.A. Now Live discussion on The Manhunt  -- a five-part series about the hunt for fugitive ex-LAPD cop Christopher Dorner. In the last chapter of the series, titled The Mountain , Goffard and other Times staff writers examine Dorner's waning struggle to escape and law enforcement efforts to track him down. With illustrations from Doug Stevens, the series has shown several angles of the manhunt for Dorner and offers a level of detail not seen in previous reporting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Joel Rubin and Ruben Vives
The president of the police commission expressed disappointment that Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck is not issuing more severe penalties for the seven officers who mistakenly opened fire on two women during the hunt for Christopher Dorner.  Steve Soboroff, whose panel oversees the LAPD, made the statements to The Times in response to a message Beck sent through the department's internal communication system. DOCUMENT: Read Beck's findings In that message, which was obtained by The Times, Beck said he had determined that the officers violated LAPD's use-of-deadly-force policy.
OPINION
February 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It's been a year since Christopher Dorner went on a killing spree to avenge his firing from the Los Angeles Police Department. Over nine days, he killed two civilians and two law enforcement officers and led authorities on a manhunt that crossed Southern California before he died in a burned-out cabin in Big Bear following a shootout. Communities were nervous, and police feared Dorner might target anyone in a uniform. All of that makes it understandable that police officers were on edge in the early hours of Feb. 7 last year as they took up positions to guard the home of a potential Dorner target in Torrance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
The decision to return eight Los Angeles police officers involved in a controversial shooting to full duty sparked an unusual public spat between the police chief and his civilian boss Thursday. In a department-wide message sent Wednesday, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck announced the seven patrol officers and a sergeant will be retrained and then allowed to resume their regular duties. For the last year, the officers have been kept off the streets on desk assignments as department officials investigated the shooting, in which the officers fired more than 100 rounds after mistaking two women in a pickup truck for fugitive Christopher Dorner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014
Join Times staff writers Joel Rubin and Kate Mather for a discussion at 9 a.m. Wednesday on the Los Angeles Police Commission's finding that eight officers violated the department's policy on using deadly force when they opened fire on two women delivering newspapers in a pickup truck during the hunt for Christopher Dorner. In making its ruling, the Police Commission followed the recommendation of LAPD Chief Charlie Beck, who faulted the officers for jumping to the conclusion Dorner was in the truck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Eight Los Angeles police officers who violated department policy when they mistakenly opened fire on two women during the hunt for Christopher Dorner will be retrained and returned to the field, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said in a department-wide message Wednesday. The message, sent on the LAPD's internal computer network and obtained by The Times, notes his disapproval in the actions of the seven officers and one sergeant.  "While I understand supervisors and officers were required to make split-second decisions regarding the perceived threat presented before them I found it to be very concerning that officers fired before adequately identifying a threat; fired without adequately identifying a target and not adequately evaluating cross fire situations," Beck said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck has found that eight officers who opened fire on two women in a pickup truck during a search for Christopher Dorner violated the department's policy on using deadly force, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the case. Beck will meet Tuesday with the Police Commission, which oversees the LAPD and has the final word on police shootings, to share his finding. The commission will then vote on whether it agrees the officers violated LAPD policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Robert J. Lopez
Jim and Karen Reynolds, who were bound and gagged by rogue ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner, will get 80% of a reported $1-million reward because they provided information that "directly led to the hot pursuit and capture of Dorner," according to the Los Angeles Police Department. Karen Reynolds called 911 on Feb. 12 after she and her husband broke free inside their Big Bear condo, where Dorner had been hiding, and provided her location and the description of the couple's Nissan SUV, which Dorner had stolen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
Christopher Dorner, the ex-Los Angeles police officer who went on a killing rampage to avenge his firing from the LAPD, lied repeatedly to further a "personal agenda" during his short time on the force and deserved to be thrown out of the department, police officials concluded in a report released Friday. Police Chief Charlie Beck ordered an internal review of Dorner's 2009 firing to address claims Dorner made about the department in a rambling manifesto he posted online, in which he described an LAPD rife with racism and corruption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Joel Rubin and Kate Mather
Eight Los Angeles police officers who opened fire on two women delivering newspapers in a pickup truck during the hunt for Christopher Dorner violated the LAPD's policy on using deadly force, the department's oversight body found Tuesday. In making its ruling, the Police Commission followed the recommendation of LAPD Chief Charlie Beck, who faulted the officers for jumping to the conclusion that Dorner was in the truck. Beck said the officers compounded their mistake by shooting in one another's direction with an unrestrained barrage of gunfire.
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