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Christopher Marlowe

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1993
Four hundred years ago, on May 30, Christopher Marlowe was killed at a public eating house southeast of London near the big bend of the Thames. The fight was supposedly over the dinner bill. But was the anger over something more serious? At least three, if not all four, of the men present were agents or spies for the British government. Perhaps we shall never know the reasons for what happened. So the life of the playwright that changed Elizabethan drama ended in mid-career. His great plays stand in their own right; but Shakespeare and others would build on his work and create one of the greatest periods of English drama.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
With the YA swoon of "Twilight" safely in the rearview mirror, movie vampires get their mojo back in the sensuous dreamscape of "Only Lovers Left Alive," one of the strongest films yet from Jim Jarmusch. A filmmaker with a deep affection for outsiders, Jarmusch sets his ode to the urbane undead - and margin-dwelling artists - in two ultra-poetic cities: Detroit, a vision of trampled grandeur on the cusp of rebirth, and worldly Tangier, its alleyways alive with the murmur of illicit doings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2004 | George Garrett, Special to The Times
More than 400 years after his death in what was officially described as a drunken brawl, Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) remains a fascinating, enigmatic, greatly gifted and mysterious character. As poet and playwright he earned the admiration (and envy) of his peers and exercised a large influence on the literature of the Elizabethan Age, particularly on many of its best and brightest writers, including William Shakespeare.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2008 | Karen Wada, Wada is a freelance writer.
The doublets are smashing and the gowns ever so elegant. But "The School of Night," which opens today at the Mark Taper Forum, is more than an Elizabethan fashion show. Robert Perdziola's costumes are as intricately crafted as Peter Whelan's 1992 drama about the political, sexual and criminal intrigues surrounding the death of Christopher Marlowe. "With this play you're never quite sure where it's going or who's to be trusted," the designer says.
BOOKS
June 5, 1994 | Christopher Hitchens, Christopher Hitchens is critic-at-large for Vanity Fair. His most recent book is a collection of essays, "For the Sake of Argument."
The title of this enthralling book already contains a sort of triple-entendre. The reckoning --which has the same etymological origin as the score --is the series of scratch-marks by which English landlords kept an account of their customers' eating and drinking. It has thus, with its verb accompaniment to settle, become an ideal metaphor in matters of crime and vengeance. It can also mean a final summing-up, as by a historian or investigator.
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1991
Re "The Land of the One-Legged Man" (by Peter S. Goodman, Sept. 22): As a survivor of World War II in my native Warsaw, Poland, may I quote Christopher Marlowe, British dramatist: "Accurst be he who first invented war." Your cover story on Cambodia is yet another example. SOPHIE BINGHAM Laguna Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1987
Sometimes your editorials make me see red, ("What Fools These Mortals Be," Sept. 30). Now you presume to tell me who you think wrote William Shakespeare's plays. As if that settles it. Next you'll be telling the Chicago Cubs to play night games. Shakespeare's plays are a subject far larger than an editorial. I can't think of many subjects that more has been written about, in fact. It's obvious the guy didn't write anything. He was a stage hand, for crying out loud. He was a front man for Christopher Marlowe or Ben Jonson or any combination of real playwrights.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992
In Peter Rainer's review of Derek Jarman's marvelous film version of Christopher Marlowe's play, "Edward II" ("An Audacious Slant on 'Edward II,' " April 10), there is a fascinating mistake that leads one to a quite startling conclusion. Marlowe was murdered May 30, 1593, but, according to Rainer, the Elizabethan spy and playwright's dramatic version of the 14th-Century homosexual King of England was written the very next year, leaving only one assumption: Someone else wrote the works of Marlowe!
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | GRAHAM HEATHCOTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The murder of Christopher Marlowe 400 years ago is one of the great unsolved mysteries of English literary history. Only 29 when he was slain in a house on Deptford Strand by the River Thames, Marlowe was the most famous playwright in England. William Shakespeare, two months younger, had yet to make his name. Marlowe's death on May 30, 1593, was said to have happened in a tavern brawl over a bill, or "reckoning." The word used at the inquest was "recknynge."
BOOKS
February 6, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
An Ambulance Is on the Way Stories of Men in Trouble Jonathan Wilson Pantheon Books: 208 pp., $21 It's all here: the nameless ailments, the broken appliances, the suburban rage, the countless minutes and the guilty hours -- every regret, every space-out and even a few instances of misplaced desire. How does Jonathan Wilson do it in "An Ambulance Is on the Way: Stories of Men in Trouble," a collection of a mere 11 short tales?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2004 | George Garrett, Special to The Times
More than 400 years after his death in what was officially described as a drunken brawl, Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) remains a fascinating, enigmatic, greatly gifted and mysterious character. As poet and playwright he earned the admiration (and envy) of his peers and exercised a large influence on the literature of the Elizabethan Age, particularly on many of its best and brightest writers, including William Shakespeare.
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recorded history of Shakespeare's life is riddled with enough gaps to invite speculation. So is that of his contemporary, Christopher Marlowe, who was killed under mysterious circumstances at age 29. Charles Marowitz weaves both playwrights into a fictive account of that incident in the mordantly funny "Murdering Marlowe," presented by Malibu Stage Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It's great to see a stubborn, rarely produced Bertolt Brecht play revived with the brio director Michael Michetti brings to "Edward II," a Circle X Theatre Company production at the Actors' Gang. Michetti's staging begins with the sound--to quote an earlier Brecht title--of drums in the night, startling enough to elicit a nervous laugh from the audience. The drummers, Stephanie Bettman on one side of the stage and percussion composer Paul Rudolph on the other, stay busy for much of the evening.
BOOKS
June 5, 1994 | Christopher Hitchens, Christopher Hitchens is critic-at-large for Vanity Fair. His most recent book is a collection of essays, "For the Sake of Argument."
The title of this enthralling book already contains a sort of triple-entendre. The reckoning --which has the same etymological origin as the score --is the series of scratch-marks by which English landlords kept an account of their customers' eating and drinking. It has thus, with its verb accompaniment to settle, become an ideal metaphor in matters of crime and vengeance. It can also mean a final summing-up, as by a historian or investigator.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | GRAHAM HEATHCOTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The murder of Christopher Marlowe 400 years ago is one of the great unsolved mysteries of English literary history. Only 29 when he was slain in a house on Deptford Strand by the River Thames, Marlowe was the most famous playwright in England. William Shakespeare, two months younger, had yet to make his name. Marlowe's death on May 30, 1593, was said to have happened in a tavern brawl over a bill, or "reckoning." The word used at the inquest was "recknynge."
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recorded history of Shakespeare's life is riddled with enough gaps to invite speculation. So is that of his contemporary, Christopher Marlowe, who was killed under mysterious circumstances at age 29. Charles Marowitz weaves both playwrights into a fictive account of that incident in the mordantly funny "Murdering Marlowe," presented by Malibu Stage Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2008 | Karen Wada, Wada is a freelance writer.
The doublets are smashing and the gowns ever so elegant. But "The School of Night," which opens today at the Mark Taper Forum, is more than an Elizabethan fashion show. Robert Perdziola's costumes are as intricately crafted as Peter Whelan's 1992 drama about the political, sexual and criminal intrigues surrounding the death of Christopher Marlowe. "With this play you're never quite sure where it's going or who's to be trusted," the designer says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1993
Four hundred years ago, on May 30, Christopher Marlowe was killed at a public eating house southeast of London near the big bend of the Thames. The fight was supposedly over the dinner bill. But was the anger over something more serious? At least three, if not all four, of the men present were agents or spies for the British government. Perhaps we shall never know the reasons for what happened. So the life of the playwright that changed Elizabethan drama ended in mid-career. His great plays stand in their own right; but Shakespeare and others would build on his work and create one of the greatest periods of English drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992
In Peter Rainer's review of Derek Jarman's marvelous film version of Christopher Marlowe's play, "Edward II" ("An Audacious Slant on 'Edward II,' " April 10), there is a fascinating mistake that leads one to a quite startling conclusion. Marlowe was murdered May 30, 1593, but, according to Rainer, the Elizabethan spy and playwright's dramatic version of the 14th-Century homosexual King of England was written the very next year, leaving only one assumption: Someone else wrote the works of Marlowe!
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