Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChristopher Shinn
IN THE NEWS

Christopher Shinn

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Rob Weinert-Kendt
NEW YORK - David Mamet has his hustlers, Edward Albee his domestic warriors, Tony Kushner his brilliant self-flagellators. If playwright Christopher Shinn has a signature character, it is the manipulative victim - the half-sympathetic, half-deplorable sort of person whose suffering is real but who uses it as rationale for bad behavior. Most recently, Shinn explored this type of character in the Tyler Clementi-inspired tale of college bullying, "Teddy Ferrara," at Chicago's Goodman Theatre.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013
"Dying City," Christopher Shinn's psychologically acute drama now having its Los Angeles premiere courtesy of Rogue Machine, offers an intriguing tussle between Kelly, a psychotherapist, and the memory of her husband, Craig, who was killed in the Iraq War under circumstances that leave open the possibility of suicide. This past is brought back in all its anguish and bitterness by the unexpected visit of Peter, Craig's identical twin. The acting is as meticulously observed as it is emotionally tense.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2005 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Talking to Christopher Shinn, it quickly becomes apparent that his plays are fueled by high ideals and intensely held convictions -- and by his own contradictions. At 29, he is unabashedly convinced of his work's excellence and has plenty of complimentary reviews to back him up.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
There are many ways of being a political playwright. Christopher Shinn's approach, centered on characters rather than on ideologies, is one that will never go out of style. Illuminating large-scale public concerns through the microscopic examination of individual behavior, Shinn finds political meaning in psychological patterns. In plays such as "Four" and "Where Do We Live" (to my mind, the most resonant theatrical response to 9/11), he has shown how the conduct of our nation is reflected in our most intimate relationships.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
There are many ways of being a political playwright. Christopher Shinn's approach, centered on characters rather than on ideologies, is one that will never go out of style. Illuminating large-scale public concerns through the microscopic examination of individual behavior, Shinn finds political meaning in psychological patterns. In plays such as "Four" and "Where Do We Live" (to my mind, the most resonant theatrical response to 9/11), he has shown how the conduct of our nation is reflected in our most intimate relationships.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013
"Dying City," Christopher Shinn's psychologically acute drama now having its Los Angeles premiere courtesy of Rogue Machine, offers an intriguing tussle between Kelly, a psychotherapist, and the memory of her husband, Craig, who was killed in the Iraq War under circumstances that leave open the possibility of suicide. This past is brought back in all its anguish and bitterness by the unexpected visit of Peter, Craig's identical twin. The acting is as meticulously observed as it is emotionally tense.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006 | Charles McNulty;Lynne Heffley
BARBARA AND LAWRENCE FLEISCHMAN THEATER, GETTY VILLA Venue A visually stunning production of Euripides' "Hippolytos" inaugurated this magnificent outdoor 450-seat theater last season. Set in the hills of Malibu, the theater has an air of enchantment that could rival anything in the mythological world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
You might have a friend like Dan in Allen Barton's new play, “Years to the Day” at the Beverly Hills Playhouse. Dan (Michael Yavnieli) is loud, abrasive and politically incorrect. He'll butcher and barbecue - and probably overcook - your sacred cows. He's been like that since college, but there's something about him you can't resist. Dan is clearly the playwright's love interest in this often diverting but thin world premiere, which dramatizes a conversation between longtime friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2005 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
The most charismatic character in Christopher Shinn's new play "On the Mountain" is dead. Jason Carlyle, a Kurt Cobain-like rock star, killed himself a few years back. His former girlfriend Sarah has tried to say good riddance. She remembers Jason as an addict and a fraud. She's now clean and sober. Another part of Sarah, however, can't let him go. She keeps photos from the old days within easy access.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
Exceptional integrity distinguishes “Parade” in Fullerton. The company 3-D Theatricals attains a rarefied level of artistry with this arresting, beautifully appointed take on Jason Robert Brown and Alfred Uhry's Tony-winning 1998 account of the notorious Leo Frank trial in 1913 Atlanta. Combining the intimately revised 2007 Donmar Warehouse version (seen at the Mark Taper Forum in 2009) with the larger scope of Harold Prince's epic Vivian Beaumont staging, director T.J. Dawson, choreographer Dana Solimando and musical director David Lamoureux approach the fact-based property and its complex themes -- anti-Semitism, legal malfeasance and political expediency among them -- with uncompromising conviction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
You might have a friend like Dan in Allen Barton's new play, “Years to the Day” at the Beverly Hills Playhouse. Dan (Michael Yavnieli) is loud, abrasive and politically incorrect. He'll butcher and barbecue - and probably overcook - your sacred cows. He's been like that since college, but there's something about him you can't resist. Dan is clearly the playwright's love interest in this often diverting but thin world premiere, which dramatizes a conversation between longtime friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Rob Weinert-Kendt
NEW YORK - David Mamet has his hustlers, Edward Albee his domestic warriors, Tony Kushner his brilliant self-flagellators. If playwright Christopher Shinn has a signature character, it is the manipulative victim - the half-sympathetic, half-deplorable sort of person whose suffering is real but who uses it as rationale for bad behavior. Most recently, Shinn explored this type of character in the Tyler Clementi-inspired tale of college bullying, "Teddy Ferrara," at Chicago's Goodman Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006 | Charles McNulty;Lynne Heffley
BARBARA AND LAWRENCE FLEISCHMAN THEATER, GETTY VILLA Venue A visually stunning production of Euripides' "Hippolytos" inaugurated this magnificent outdoor 450-seat theater last season. Set in the hills of Malibu, the theater has an air of enchantment that could rival anything in the mythological world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2005 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
The most charismatic character in Christopher Shinn's new play "On the Mountain" is dead. Jason Carlyle, a Kurt Cobain-like rock star, killed himself a few years back. His former girlfriend Sarah has tried to say good riddance. She remembers Jason as an addict and a fraud. She's now clean and sober. Another part of Sarah, however, can't let him go. She keeps photos from the old days within easy access.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2005 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Talking to Christopher Shinn, it quickly becomes apparent that his plays are fueled by high ideals and intensely held convictions -- and by his own contradictions. At 29, he is unabashedly convinced of his work's excellence and has plenty of complimentary reviews to back him up.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Four of the nine plays in South Coast Repertory's 2004-05 season will be world premieres, the theater has announced, among them the previously billed "Brooklyn Boy" by Donald Margulies, whose "Dinner With Friends" won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for drama. Margulies' play about a bestselling novelist facing temptation, including blandishments from Hollywood, will run Sept. 10 to Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: Southern California: David Mamet's "American Buffalo" was revived at the Geffen with its concussive verbal force and fierce con games intact. Christopher Shinn's "Dying City" delicately explored the slipperiness of traumatic memory in a multilayered production at Rogue Machine. John Douglas Thompson and Glynn Turman brought anguish and ecstasy to the searing Mark Taper Forum revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|